Internal Medicine Quizzes Online & Trivia

Are you a health buff? Are you aware that some fruits and vegetables are more fibrous than others? Think you know everything there is to know about internal medicine?

You will be amazed at how many new things you can learn with internal medicine quizzes online!

Test your knowledge of internal medicine with these awesome internal medicine quizzes to satisfy your hunger for knowledge. Share these internal medicine quizzes with your friends and peers to find out who is the most aware out of you all.

Enhance your knowledge about a topic or learn something completely new by answering quiz questions. You can prepare for an upcoming test, simply keep yourself updated or even get insights into creating awesome questions with these internal medicine quizzes.

Each and every internal medicine quiz that we have is made up of well-researched and interesting quiz questions that test your awareness and grasp of the subject. With detailed instant feedback for quiz answers, you can easily learn something new about internal medicine with every question you attempt.

View results instantly and share them online with your network to get some serious bragging rights. So what are you waiting for? Take the ultimate internal medicine quiz and check if you're the master of the subject.

Related Topics


  • Which of the following is the most cost-effective and efficacious treatment for this patient? A 60-year-old man is evaluated for a 3-month history of persistent left lower facial pain in the...
    Which of the following is the most cost-effective and efficacious treatment for this patient? A 60-year-old man is evaluated for a 3-month history of persistent left lower facial pain in the...
    CarbamazepineAnswer and Critique (Correct Answer = D) Key Point Carbamazepine improves pain in patients with trigeminal neuralgia without any higher incidence of major adverse events compared with placebo. This patient has trigeminal neuralgia. Although there is little evidence on efficacious therapies for this disorder, in a meta-analysis of three placebo-controlled studies, carbamazepine was associated with a number needed to treat of 2.5 (95% CI, 2.0 to 3.4) for improvement of pain (typically a 50% reduction in pain), without any higher incidence of major adverse events compared with placebo. No other anticonvulsant agent has been adequately studied in randomized, placebo-controlled trials for treatment of this disorder. Narcotic analgesia is only modestly effective at treating neuropathic pain and should be reserved only for patients whose pain is recalcitrant to non-narcotic treatments. Although gabapentin is increasingly being used for patients with neuropathic pain, there is no clinical trial evidence for its efficacy in treating trigeminal neuralgia. In addition, compared with carbamazepine, gabapentin has not been found to be superior in treating other neuropathic syndromes, is considerably more expensive, and requires more frequent dosing. Tricyclic antidepressants are efficacious in treating several neuropathic pain syndromes, although these agents have not been studied in patients with trigeminal neuralgia. Cannabinoids are the natural constituents of marijuana (cannabis) and consist of delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), cannabinol, and cannabidiol. Cannabinoids are currently being studied as treatment for chronic pain but have not yet been proved efficacious in patients with neuropathic pain syndromes. Bibliography 1. Wiffen P, Collins S, McQuay H, Carroll D, Jadad A, Moore A. Anticonvulsant drugs for acute and chronic pain. Cochrane Database Syst Rev. 2005:CD001133. [PMID: 16034857] [PubMed]

  • Which of the following is the most appropriate next step in the management of this patient? A 22-year-old woman is evaluated for acne on her face that has worsened over the past few weeks and...
    Which of the following is the most appropriate next step in the management of this patient? A 22-year-old woman is evaluated for acne on her face that has worsened over the past few weeks and...
    Prescribe oral tetracyclineAnswer and Critique (Correct Answer = B) Key Point Oral isotretinoin is Food and Drug Administration approved only for recalcitrant nodular acne and is associated with an 80% remission rate. This patients skin examination findings are consistent with moderate-to-severe inflammatory acne. The combination of a topical comedolytic agent (a retinoid) and the topical antibiotic have not been effective. The next step in management would be concomitant use of an oral antibiotic with a topical antibiotic. Oral antibiotics, particularly in the tetracycline group, are efficacious and relatively safe for treating moderate-to-severe acne. Oral antibiotic treatment generally requires 6 to 8 weeks before efficacy can be determined, but consensus is lacking on the appropriate length of oral antibiotic treatment courses. Prolonged use of topical or oral antibiotics can lead to bacterial resistance. Combined oral contraceptives can be used as a treatment for women with acne; ethinyl estradiol and norgestimate (Ortho Tri-Cyclin«) and ethinyl estradiol and norethindrone (Estrostep«) are Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approved for this indication. Discontinuing oral contraceptives would not improve, and may worsen, acne. Oral isotretinoin is FDA approved only for recalcitrant nodular acne and is associated with an 80% remission rate. However, this agent is also frequently associated with mucocutaneous side effects and teratogenicity. Physicians who prescribe isotretinoin must have evidence of a recent negative pregnancy test, provide counseling regarding pregnancy prevention, and obtain informed patient consent. Oral isotretinoin has also been linked with depression, suicidal ideation, suicide attempts, and suicide, but there is no clear causal relationship between these events and isotretinoin. A rare adverse effect of oral isotretinoin is acne fulminous, which requires treatment with systemic corticosteroids. Oral corticosteroids are not a treatment for, and may cause, acne. Bibliography 1. Haider A, Shaw JC. Treatment of acne vulgaris. JAMA. 2004;292:726-35. [PMID: 15304471] [PubMed] 2. PIER: Physicians Information and Education Resource [database online]. Philadelphia: American College of Physicians; 2006. Updated February 27, 2006. Available at http://pier.acponline.org/info/?hp?DocId=19&FxId=50&Scroll=1&Index=0&SessionId=67A87EVZTNIUCVBJ.

  • Which of the following is the most likely diagnosis? A 24-year-old woman with Down's syndrome is evaluated for hair loss. Hair comes out in patches when she washes or brushes it. She feels well and...
    Which of the following is the most likely diagnosis? A 24-year-old woman with Down's syndrome is evaluated for hair loss. Hair comes out in patches when she washes or brushes it. She feels well and...
    Alopecia areataAnswer and Critique (Correct Answer = D) Key Points Alopecia areata is common in thyroid disease, vitiligo, diabetes, atopy, and Downs syndrome. The affected skin in alopecia areata generally has no signs of inflammation, desquamation, or scarring. Alopecia areata is common in thyroid disease, vitiligo, diabetes, atopy, and Downs syndrome. The affected skin generally has no signs of inflammation, desquamation, or scarring. Typically, there are one or more rounded, denuded patches in hair-bearing areas. Evaluating the hair bulbs under microscopy reveals tapering of the proximal end or exclamation point hairs, which are pathognomonic of this condition. It can also be valuable to do a pull test to see how many hairs come out with gentle traction. A positive result consisting of 25 to 50 hairs removed indicates that the disease is active, and further hair loss should be anticipated. For limited disease, a topical corticosteroid or minoxidil is effective in delaying hair loss, and for more extensive disease, oral or pulse intravenous corticosteroids are effective in delaying hair loss; however, neither corticosteroids nor minoxidil has an effect on ultimate outcome in patients with hair loss. New biologic therapies to selectively inhibit the immune response are being studied for alopecia areata. Telogen effluvium is nonpermanent hair loss that can be related to drug effect, acute illness, or stress. Hair shifts into the shedding or telogen phase instead of the growth phase, which creates increased hair loss. On examination, 25 to 50 hairs can be removed with a gentle pull. Microscopy demonstrates a white bulb on the shaft. It is usually self-limited and requires only reassurance to the patient. Trichotillomania is habitual pulling out of hair. It can be isolated or associated with mental health problems, especially compulsion or impulse-control behaviors, and is difficult to treat. Behavioral therapy alone or in combination with pharmacologic therapy has been studied for this condition. Tinea capitis is a superficial fungal infection of the skin, commonly affecting the scalp, eyebrows, and eyelashes. Lesions generally show evidence of active infection with exudates, inflamed crusts, matted hair, and even debris. In severe cases, it can develop into a patch with hair loss and scarring alopecia. Most, but not all, pathogens in tinea capitis cause the infected hairs to fluoresce in black ultraviolet light with Woods light examination. Microscopy and culture can also aid the diagnosis. Treatment is with griseofulvin or an antifungal azole medication. Topical treatment is usually ineffective. Bibliography 1. Norris D. Alopecia areata: current state of knowledge. J Am Acad Dermatol. 2004;51:S16-7. [PMID: 15243493] [PubMed]

  • Which is the most appropriate treatment option for this patient? A 37-year-old man is evaluated during a routine visit and reports feeling depressed. He meets the criteria for major depression and...
    Which is the most appropriate treatment option for this patient? A 37-year-old man is evaluated during a routine visit and reports feeling depressed. He meets the criteria for major depression and...
    ParoxetineAnswer and Critique (Correct Answer = A) Key Points All the selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors and the serotonin norepinephrine reuptake inhibitors are effective for depression and generalized anxiety disorder and have Food and Drug Administration approval for these indications. Depressive symptoms often respond more quickly to treatment than do anxiety symptoms, and it is not uncommon for anxiety to be unmasked during the first few weeks of antidepressant treatment. This patient has major depression and generalized anxiety disorder and should receive paroxetine. All the selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors and the serotonin norepinephrine reuptake inhibitors are effective for depression and generalized anxiety disorder and have Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approval for these indications. Bupropion is a proven antidepressant and clonazepam is a proven anxiolytic, but neither is FDA approved for treating depression and anxiety. The atypical antipsychotic agents, such as risperidone, olanzapine, and quetiapine, are sometimes added to antidepressant therapy to augment response in patients with treatment-resistant major depressive disorder but are not indicated as monotherapy for major depression and dysthymia or generalized anxiety disorder. Patients with depression commonly have some symptoms of anxiety also, and approximately one third meet the criteria for a concomitant anxiety disorder. Depressive symptoms often respond more quickly to treatment than do anxiety symptoms, and it is not uncommon for anxiety to be unmasked during the first few weeks of antidepressant treatment. Bibliography 1. Kroenke K, West SL, Swindle R, Gilsenan A, Eckert GJ, Dolor R, et al. Similar effectiveness of paroxetine, fluoxetine, and sertraline in primary care: a randomized trial. JAMA. 2001;286:2947-55. [PMID: 11743835] [PubMed]

  • A 20-year-old male college student is having trouble sleeping because of an itchy rash on his hands and inner aspect of his arm. His pruritus has been recurring for several years, becoming more...
    A 20-year-old male college student is having trouble sleeping because of an itchy rash on his hands and inner aspect of his arm. His pruritus has been recurring for several years, becoming more...
    Topical corticosteroidsAnswer and Critique (Correct Answer = A) Key Point Topical corticosteroids are the best treatment for atopic dermatitis in patients who are already using topical moisturizers. This patient has atopic dermatitis, most commonly associated with a rash in the creases of the skin and on the hands. Topical corticosteroids are best suited to treat moderate to severe symptoms of this condition when the patient is already using topical moisturizers (emollients), the typical first-line treatment. Severity is determined by involvement of more than one location, presence of sleep disturbance, and poor response to topical moisturizers. For the face, neck and intertriginous areas, only mild topical corticosteroids should be used. For the rest of the body, the lowest effective potency should be used intermittently, such as twice per week, to avoid thinning of the skin from regular topical corticosteroid use. Topical tacrolimus may as effective as topical corticosteroids, but topical tacrolimus is indicated only for moderate to severe dermatitis that is unresponsive to topical corticosteroids, or for patients who cannot tolerate topical corticosteroids. Topical tacrolimus might also help where only the lowest-potency topical corticosteroids can be used, such as on the face, neck, and intertriginous areas. In March 2005, the Food and Drug Administration released an alert establishing a potential connection between the use of topical tacrolimus and lymphomas and skin cancers, based on case reports and studies in animals. For this reason, tacrolimus should be used only for short-term and intermittent treatment. Oral antibiotics and topical antifungals cannot be used to effectively treat atopic dermatitis. Oral corticosteroids are recommended only for a severe flare-up of dermatitis that is unresponsive to topical treatments. The support of a specialist, if available, is also recommended. No randomized trials support the use of oral corticosteroids; the optimal dose and length of treatment are unknown. The criteria for the diagnosis of atopic dermatitis includes evidence of itchy skin plus three or more of the following: 1) involvement of the skin creases, including areas around the neck or eyes, elbows, knees, and ankles; 2) history of asthma or hay fever; 3) history of dry skin during the past year; 4) onset in a child younger than 2 years of age; and 5) visible dermatitis of skin flexures. Bibliography 1. Williams HC. Clinical practice. Atopic dermatitis. N Engl J Med. 2005;352:2314-24. [PMID: 15930422] [PubMed]

  • A 35-year-old woman is evaluated for a red right eye that is also tearing; her symptoms have developed over the past 24 hours. Her vision is not altered, and she denies eye pain, trauma to the eye,...
    A 35-year-old woman is evaluated for a red right eye that is also tearing; her symptoms have developed over the past 24 hours. Her vision is not altered, and she denies eye pain, trauma to the eye,...
    No further treatmentAnswer and Critique (Correct Answer = B) Key Point Viral conjunctivitis is characterized by subacute appearance of a red eye without ocular pain or change in visual acuity. This patient with a red eye and tearing most likely has viral conjunctivitis. This is a self-limited process that is expected to resolve spontaneously. No further treatment is required. The key aspects of the history that are used to establish this patients diagnosis are the presence of a red eye, the absence of ocular pain, and the absence of visual changes. The patient can be reassured but told that the process may spread to the other eye and could be contagious for 2 weeks. The absence of purulent discharge indicates that this is not bacterial conjunctivitis, and, therefore, topical antibiotics are not needed. Allergic conjunctivitis is an unlikely diagnosis in this patient given the absence of pruritus and the unilateral distribution of symptoms. Therefore, topical antihistamines are not indicated. An urgent referral to an ophthalmologist for red eye is needed only in patients who have ocular pain and visual loss, symptoms of which may be suggestive of scleritis, acute angle-closure glaucoma, anterior uveitis, or viral or bacterial keratitis. Treatment with topical corticosteroids is indicated in the case of anterior uveitis, which is characterized by red eye but is also associated with ocular pain and visual loss, symptoms not found in this patient. Topical corticosteroids are generally not recommended without an evaluation by an ophthalmologist because they may worsen some types of eye conditions, specifically herpes keratitis. Patients with signs suspicious for anterior uveitis require urgent referral to an ophthalmologist. Bibliography 1. Leibowitz HM. The red eye. N Engl J Med. 2000;343:345-51. [PMID: 10922425] [PubMed]

  • An 18-year-old woman is evaluated for acne. She has had intermittent outbreaks of acne over the past 5 years. She is currently a college student who experiences stress associated with her studies....
    An 18-year-old woman is evaluated for acne. She has had intermittent outbreaks of acne over the past 5 years. She is currently a college student who experiences stress associated with her studies....
    Topical retinoid medicationsAnswer and Critique (Correct Answer = B) Key Point For comedonal-only acne, topical retinoids are the mainstay of treatment. This patient has mild, comedonal acne with an absence of inflammatory lesions. For comedonal-only acne, topical retinoids are the mainstay of treatment. Retinoids are derivatives of vitamin A and prevent comedone formation by normalizing desquamation of follicular epithelium. Topical retinoid therapies may be combined with other topical agents, including antibiotics or keratolytic agents, but there is no evidence that combined-agent topical therapy is better than single-agent topical therapy for treating comedonal-only acne. Combined-agent therapy with a topical antibiotic may be helpful if there are inflammatory lesions (pustules) in addition to comedonal lesions. There is no evidence that avoidance of certain foods, including fried foods or chocolate, will prevent or treat acne. Oral corticosteroids are not a treatment for, and may cause, acne. Oral antibiotics are indicated for moderate-to-severe inflammatory acne and are not required in this case. Topical tretinoin is not teratogenic. In contrast, oral tretinoin is teratogenic and requires registration in an FDA iPLEDGE program by prescribing physicians. The iPLEDGE program requires a recent negative pregnancy test, counseling regarding pregnancy prevention, and informed patient consent. Bibliography 1. Haider A, Shaw JC. Treatment of acne vulgaris. JAMA. 2004;292:726-35. [PMID: 15304471] [PubMed] 2. PIER: Physicians Information and Education Resource [database online]. Philadelphia: American College of Physicians; 2006. Updated February 27, 2006. Available at http://pier.acponline.org/info/?hp?DocId=19&FxId=50&Scroll=1&Index=0&SessionId=67A87EVZTNIUCVBJ.

  • A 22-year-old woman is evaluated for acne on her face that has worsened over the past few weeks and includes inflammatory and small nodular lesions. The patient has a history of moderate-to-severe...
    A 22-year-old woman is evaluated for acne on her face that has worsened over the past few weeks and includes inflammatory and small nodular lesions. The patient has a history of moderate-to-severe...
    Prescribe oral tetracyclineAnswer and Critique (Correct Answer = B) Key Point Oral isotretinoin is Food and Drug Administration approved only for recalcitrant nodular acne and is associated with an 80% remission rate. This patients skin examination findings are consistent with moderate-to-severe inflammatory acne. The combination of a topical comedolytic agent (a retinoid) and the topical antibiotic have not been effective. The next step in management would be concomitant use of an oral antibiotic with a topical antibiotic. Oral antibiotics, particularly in the tetracycline group, are efficacious and relatively safe for treating moderate-to-severe acne. Oral antibiotic treatment generally requires 6 to 8 weeks before efficacy can be determined, but consensus is lacking on the appropriate length of oral antibiotic treatment courses. Prolonged use of topical or oral antibiotics can lead to bacterial resistance. Combined oral contraceptives can be used as a treatment for women with acne; ethinyl estradiol and norgestimate (Ortho Tri-Cyclin«) and ethinyl estradiol and norethindrone (Estrostep«) are Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approved for this indication. Discontinuing oral contraceptives would not improve, and may worsen, acne. Oral isotretinoin is FDA approved only for recalcitrant nodular acne and is associated with an 80% remission rate. However, this agent is also frequently associated with mucocutaneous side effects and teratogenicity. Physicians who prescribe isotretinoin must have evidence of a recent negative pregnancy test, provide counseling regarding pregnancy prevention, and obtain informed patient consent. Oral isotretinoin has also been linked with depression, suicidal ideation, suicide attempts, and suicide, but there is no clear causal relationship between these events and isotretinoin. A rare adverse effect of oral isotretinoin is acne fulminous, which requires treatment with systemic corticosteroids. Oral corticosteroids are not a treatment for, and may cause, acne. Bibliography 1. Haider A, Shaw JC. Treatment of acne vulgaris. JAMA. 2004;292:726-35. [PMID: 15304471] [PubMed] 2. PIER: Physicians Information and Education Resource [database online]. Philadelphia: American College of Physicians; 2006. Updated February 27, 2006. Available at http://pier.acponline.org/info/?hp?DocId=19&FxId=50&Scroll=1&Index=0&SessionId=67A87EVZTNIUCVBJ.

  • A 54-year-old woman undergoes urgent preoperative evaluation before resection of a partially obstructing mass in the descending colon. She has lost 9 kg (20 lb) over the past 6 months. Her history...
    A 54-year-old woman undergoes urgent preoperative evaluation before resection of a partially obstructing mass in the descending colon. She has lost 9 kg (20 lb) over the past 6 months. Her history...
    Incentive spirometryAnswer and Critique (Correct Answer = D) Key Point The evidence is good that routine postoperative lung expansion (for example, incentive spirometry or deep-breathing exercises) prevents postoperative pulmonary complications. The evidence is good that routine postoperative lung expansion (for example, incentive spirometry or deep-breathing exercises) prevents postoperative pulmonary complications. Based on current evidence, no modality is clearly superior to the other, but nasal continuous positive airway pressure may be particularly useful in patients who are not able to perform incentive spirometry. The evidence is insufficient to determine whether prophylactic corticosteroids or antibiotics prevent pneumonia. Multiple trials have shown that routine intravenous or enteral hyperalimentation in malnourished patients does not prevent postoperative pulmonary complications except perhaps in the severely malnourished or in those expected to be without oral intake for an extended period (for example, 2 or 3 weeks). There is emerging evidence suggesting that enteral nutrition especially formulated to enhance the immune system may prevent postoperative infection. Bibliography 1. Lawrence VA, Cornell JE, Smetana GW. Strategies to reduce postoperative pulmonary complications after noncardiothoracic surgery: systematic review for the American College of Physicians. Ann Intern Med. 2006;144:596-608. [PMID: 16618957] [PubMed] 2. Qaseem A, Snow V, Fitterman N, Hornbake ER, Lawrence VA, Smetana GW, et al. Risk assessment for and strategies to reduce perioperative pulmonary complications for patients undergoing noncardiothoracic surgery: a guideline from the American College of Physicians. Ann Intern Med. 2006;144:575-80. [PMID: 16618955] [PubMed]

  • A 25-year-old woman is evaluated for a 3-day history of malodorous vaginal discharge. She denies any itching or irritation. She has been sexually active with the same partner for 6 months, using...
    A 25-year-old woman is evaluated for a 3-day history of malodorous vaginal discharge. She denies any itching or irritation. She has been sexually active with the same partner for 6 months, using...
    Bacterial vaginosisAnswer and Critique (Correct Answer = D) Key Point Symptoms of bacterial vaginosis include increased malodorous discharge without irritation or pain. Symptoms of bacterial vaginosis include increased malodorous discharge without irritation or pain. On physical examination, clinical criteria for bacterial vaginosis include homogenous, white discharge that smoothly coats the vaginal walls, without the presence of vaginal erythema; presence of clue cells; vaginal pH >4.5; and vaginal discharge that develops a fishy odor either before or after the addition of 10% potassium hydroxide slide preparation. Symptomatic patients who have at least three of these criteria should be treated with metronidazole or clindamycin, either orally or vaginally. Patients with candidal vaginitis are likely to have vaginal irritation, inflammation, and lack of odor on physical examination. Patients with Trichomonas vaginalis often note a discharge that is typically yellowgreen. Physiologic discharge is not usually malodorous and would not likely change as suddenly as this patients history suggests. Bibliography 1. Anderson MR, Klink K, Cohrssen A. Evaluation of vaginal complaints. JAMA. 2004;291:1368-79. [PMID: 15026404] [PubMed]

Top Trending Quizzes
Trivia Questions Quiz On Types Of People!
Mind Your Health: Interesting Healthy Facts And Questions! Trivia Quiz
Will You Pass Your Exams?
Which Famous American Athlete Are You?
Occupational Health And Safety Quiz
How Black Country Are You?
Will A Chromebook Suite Me?
Test Your Knowledge About Computers And Programming Language?
Japanese Geography Trivia Quiz
Quiz On The Principles Of Art
Quiz: Which Sport Really Matches Your Personality?
Can You Name The Following Extinct Animals?
Trivia Questions Quiz On The Structure And Science Of The QRIS!
Are You Sanatorium Or Heavy Metal? Fun Quiz
Do You Want To Play A Game? Trivia For The Saw Series Fan
Trivia Quiz On ESL Level 8 Exam
What Is Your Heritage?
Test Your Knowledge On Health And Body!
Quiz: What Book Genre Is Right For You?
How Well Do You Know About Health And Fitness? Trivia Quiz
Who Is Your Celebrity Look A Like?
World's Hardest Science Quiz You'll Ever Take!
Celebrity Look Alike Personality Quiz
Nouveau, Bauhaus, Dada Art Movements! Trivia Quiz
Are You A Boy Or A Girl? (kids' Fun Quiz)
Am I Frigid? Personality Quiz
Patriotic History Quiz
Will You Be Successful?
What Movie Genre Do You Belong In?
Take The Quiz And Find Out If You're A TV Show Expert
Take The Quiz To Find Out What Celebrity You Are Most Like!
Quiz About Speak Book By Laurie Halse Anderson
What Type Of Online Business Should I Open?
Art Quiz: Trivia On Principles Of Design
Quiz: Which Animal Has A Message For You Today?
The Advanced Computer Quiz
Honors Review Quiz For English III Honors Classes: 2008-2009
Knowledge Trivia Test On Computer Terms And Vocabulary! Quiz
Musical Terms And Signs! Trivia Questions Quiz
What Kind Of A Food Shopper Are You?
Advantages And Disadvantages Of Business Partnership!
How Much Of A Contribution Do You Make To Society?
Game Quiz: Yu-GI-oh! Gx Duel Academy!
Business Profile - Quick Quiz
What Country Should You Live In?
Foodie Quiz: How Much Of A Foodie Are You?
Which Sa TV Program Character Are You?
Which Ds Game Should You Get?
Business Chemistry Profile Quiz!
Interesting Science Trivia Facts For Science Savvy! Quiz
Wild Guess Quiz: Whether You Are Male Or Female?