W01 - Basics Of Work Order Management

9 Questions | Total Attempts: 2127

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Management Quizzes & Trivia

Questions and Answers
  • 1. 
    When a Predictive Work Order is scheduled, this alleviates the risk of waiting for problems to occur with important Assets. 
    • A. 

      True

    • B. 

      False

  • 2. 
    What module is considered the heart of Maintenance Connection?
    • A. 

      Purchase Orders

    • B. 

      Assets

    • C. 

      Work Orders

    • D. 

      Reporter

  • 3. 
    What are the three general types of Work Orders? (Select all that apply)
    • A. 

      Corrective

    • B. 

      Predictive

    • C. 

      Restorative

    • D. 

      Preventative

  • 4. 
    What are three of the main components of Work Orders? (Select all that apply)
    • A. 

      Tasks

    • B. 

      Approvals

    • C. 

      Labor Resources

    • D. 

      Costs

    • E. 

      Misc Attachments

  • 5. 
    Procedures are a list of instructions and/or actions that typically should be completed prior to closing the Work Order.
    • A. 

      True

    • B. 

      False

  • 6. 
    What main Work Order component is used for adding the additional items that are required to complete Work Orders (such as gloves, hammers, etc.) and the location in which they can be found?
    • A. 

      Tasks

    • B. 

      Materials

    • C. 

      Other Costs

    • D. 

      Tools

  • 7. 
    A Corrective Work Order is created from the Service Requester or created manually through the MRO. This is the most common Work Orders.
    • A. 

      True

    • B. 

      False

  • 8. 
    What field of a Work Order is used for typing the description and important details of the request?
    • A. 

      Reason

    • B. 

      Problem

    • C. 

      Schedule

    • D. 

      Specifics

  • 9. 
    What tab can be utilized to track Labor, Materials, and Tools?
    • A. 

      Assign

    • B. 

      Costs

    • C. 

      Details

    • D. 

      History

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