Poetry Quiz

41 Questions | Total Attempts: 151

SettingsSettingsSettings
Please wait...
Poetry Quiz

.


Questions and Answers
  • 1. 
    1.When words end in the same sound, like boot and flute, that is:
    • A. 

      Alliteration

    • B. 

      Consonance

    • C. 

      Rhyme

    • D. 

      Assonance

  • 2. 
    2. One-syllable rhyme, like knee and sea, is called:
    • A. 

      A.Masculine rhyme

    • B. 

      A.Feminine rhyme

    • C. 

      A.Eye-rhyme

    • D. 

      A.End rhyme

  • 3. 
    3. Words that look the same but do not sound the same, like tough and through, are called:
    • A. 

      A.Internal rhyme

    • B. 

      A.End rhyme

    • C. 

      A.Eye-rhyme

    • D. 

      A.Near rhyme

  • 4. 
    4. The pattern of rhyme, indicated by a letter sequence, is called:
    • A. 

      A.Rhyme line

    • B. 

      B.Rhyme scheme

    • C. 

      C.Rhyme sequence

    • D. 

      D.Rhyme structure

  • 5. 
    5. When a rhyming word is in the middle of a line, that is:
    • A. 

      A.Internal rhyme

    • B. 

      B.End rhyme

    • C. 

      C.Rhyme stopped

    • D. 

      D.Center rhyme

  • 6. 
    6. When periods or commas make pauses at the ends of lines, the lines are:
    • A. 

      A.End-stopped

    • B. 

      B.Enjambed

    • C. 

      C.Rhyme stopped

    • D. 

      D.Line-stopped

  • 7. 
    7. Lines that do not pause at the end are called:
    • A. 

      A.Run-on

    • B. 

      B.Flow lines

    • C. 

      C.Enjambed

    • D. 

      D.End-run

  • 8. 
    8. “For after the rain when with never a stain” contains:
    • A. 

      A.A sonnet

    • B. 

      B.Feminine rhyme

    • C. 

      C.Eye-rhyme

    • D. 

      D.Internal rhyme

  • 9. 
    9. The words daughter and water are an example of:
    • A. 

      A.Feminine rhyme

    • B. 

      B.Masculine rhyme

    • C. 

      C.Eye-rhyme

    • D. 

      D.Rime royal

  • 10. 
    10. When words begin with the same vowel or constant sound, that is called:
    • A. 

      A.Consonance

    • B. 

      B.Assonance

    • C. 

      C.Alliteration

    • D. 

      D.Internal rhyme

  • 11. 
    11. The line “Sing no sad songs for me” contains:
    • A. 

      A.Alliteration

    • B. 

      B.A metaphor

    • C. 

      C.Assonance

    • D. 

      D.Trochees

  • 12. 
    12. Poets often alliterate:
    • A. 

      A.Adverbs

    • B. 

      B.The adjectives and noun

    • C. 

      C.The subject of the clause

    • D. 

      D.Metaphors

  • 13. 
    13. When words share the same consonant sound, like speak, sleet, and receipt, that is:
    • A. 

      A.Alliteration

    • B. 

      B.A metaphor

    • C. 

      C.Consonance

    • D. 

      D.Assonance

  • 14. 
    14. When words share the same consonant sound, like slimmer, hum, and emu, that is:
    • A. 

      A.Assonance

    • B. 

      B.Consonance

    • C. 

      C.Conjugation

    • D. 

      D.Containment

  • 15. 
    15. The line “Much madness is divinest sense” contains examples of:
    • A. 

      A.Internal rhyme

    • B. 

      B.Eye-rhyme

    • C. 

      C.Reversal

    • D. 

      D.Enjambment

  • 16. 
    16. When a word mimics a sound or noise in nature, that is called:
    • A. 

      A.Intonation

    • B. 

      B.Onomatopoeia

    • C. 

      C.Recall

    • D. 

      D.Metaphor

  • 17. 
    17. The pattern of stressed and unstressed syllables is called:
    • A. 

      A.Alliteration

    • B. 

      B.Meter

    • C. 

      C.Iambics

    • D. 

      D.Line flow

  • 18. 
    18. A repeating stress pattern is called the poetic:
    • A. 

      A.Foot

    • B. 

      B.Hand

    • C. 

      C.Length

    • D. 

      D.Quantum

  • 19. 
    19. A two-syllable foot with the second syllable stressed is called a(n):
    • A. 

      A.Anapest

    • B. 

      B.Dactyl

    • C. 

      C.Iamb

    • D. 

      D.Trochee

  • 20. 
    20. A two-syllable foot with the first syllable stressed is called a(n):
    • A. 

      A.Anapest

    • B. 

      B.Dactyl

    • C. 

      C.Iamb

    • D. 

      D.Trochee

  • 21. 
    23. The English language is naturally:
    • A. 

      A.Iambic

    • B. 

      B.Trochaic

    • C. 

      C.Dactylic

    • D. 

      D.Anapestic

  • 22. 
    26. A sonnet is written in:
    • A. 

      A.Iambic trimeter

    • B. 

      B.Iambic tetrameter

    • C. 

      C.Iambic pentameter

    • D. 

      D.Iambic hexameter

  • 23. 
    36. A break or pause in the middle of a line or poetry is called a(n):
    • A. 

      A.Caesura

    • B. 

      B.Internal stop

    • C. 

      C.End-stop

    • D. 

      D.Pausura

  • 24. 
    37. The repeating sections of a poem are called:
    • A. 

      A.Segments

    • B. 

      B.Stanzas

    • C. 

      C.Fragments

    • D. 

      D.Units

  • 25. 
    38. A quatrain has:
    • A. 

      A.Two lines

    • B. 

      B.Three lines

    • C. 

      C.Four lines

    • D. 

      D.Five lines

  • 26. 
    39. A sonnet has:
    • A. 

      A.Nine lines

    • B. 

      B.Ten lines

    • C. 

      C.Twelve lines

    • D. 

      D.Fourteen lines

  • 27. 
    41. The rhyme scheme of a ballad is:
    • A. 

      A.aabb

    • B. 

      B.abca

    • C. 

      C.abcb

    • D. 

      D.abba

  • 28. 
    42. A limerick is a:
    • A. 

      A.Four-line stanza

    • B. 

      B.Five-line stanza

    • C. 

      C.Rhymed couplet

    • D. 

      D.Japanese poetic form

  • 29. 
    43. The rime royal stanza has:
    • A. 

      A.Nine lines of iambic tetrameter

    • B. 

      B.Seven lines of iambic pentameter

    • C. 

      C.Four lines of iambic tetrameter

    • D. 

      D.eight lines of iambic pentameter

  • 30. 
    44. The rime royal stanza is named after:
    • A. 

      A.King James of Scotland

    • B. 

      B.Alexander the Great

    • C. 

      C.William the Conqueror

    • D. 

      D.Charlemagne

  • 31. 
    45. A two-line stanza of rhyming iambic pentameter is a:
    • A. 

      A.Royal pair

    • B. 

      B.Heroic couplet

    • C. 

      C.Double metric

    • D. 

      D.Medi-ballad

  • 32. 
    46. A poem with rhyme scheme ababcdcdefefgg is likely:
    • A. 

      A.Rime royal

    • B. 

      B.A limerick

    • C. 

      C.An Italian sonnet

    • D. 

      D.An English sonnet

  • 33. 
    53. A haiku is:
    • A. 

      A.Two lines

    • B. 

      B.Three lines

    • C. 

      C.Four lines

    • D. 

      D.Five lines

  • 34. 
    54. Ezra Pound’s use of crowd and bough is an example of:
    • A. 

      A.Rhyme

    • B. 

      B.Alliteration

    • C. 

      C.Consonance

    • D. 

      D.Assonance

  • 35. 
    55. A comparison using words such as like or as is called:
    • A. 

      A.A metaphor

    • B. 

      B.Personification

    • C. 

      C.A simile

    • D. 

      D.apostrophe

  • 36. 
    56. A comparison that says that one thing is another is called:
    • A. 

      A.A metaphor

    • B. 

      B.Personification

    • C. 

      C.A simile

    • D. 

      D.Apostrophe

  • 37. 
    57. “The day came like hindered rubies is:
    • A. 

      A.A metaphor

    • B. 

      B.Personification

    • C. 

      C.A simile

    • D. 

      D.apostrophe

  • 38. 
    59. Portraying an animal or object as a person is called:
    • A. 

      A.Objectification

    • B. 

      B.Personification

    • C. 

      C.Animalism

    • D. 

      D.Apostrophe

  • 39. 
    60. Addressing someone absent as though he or she were present is called:
    • A. 

      A.A metaphor

    • B. 

      B.Personification

    • C. 

      C.A simile

    • D. 

      D.Apostrophe

  • 40. 
    61. The words “sweet sorrow” are an example of:
    • A. 

      A.A metaphor

    • B. 

      B.An oxymoron

    • C. 

      C.A simile

    • D. 

      D.Apostrophe

  • 41. 
    62. “Hope is the thing with feathers” is an example of:
    • A. 

      A.A metaphor

    • B. 

      B.An oxymoron

    • C. 

      C.A simile

    • D. 

      D.Apostrophesw