Test For Clore (2)

31 Questions | Total Attempts: 790

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Test For Clore (2) - Quiz

Bạn có đúng 60 phút để làm bài trắc nghiệm, và mỗi bài trắc nghiệm bạn chỉ có thể làm 01 lần. Vì vậy, trước khi bắt đầu, bạn vui lòng thu xếp công việc để quá trình làm test không bị gián đoạn. Bài trắc nghiệm gồm 4 phần: 1. Data processing - đọc hiểu và ghi lại thông tin cần thiết: câu 1 - 10 (khoảng 30p) 2. English : câu 11 - 19 (khoảng 15p) 3. Problem solving : câu 20 - 30 (khoảng 10p) 4. Hiểu biết của bạn về Officience và về vị trí (khoảng 5p) Chú ý: Mỗi câu hỏi chỉ xuất hiện một lần trên màn hình. Khi đã nhấp vào "next", bạn sẽ KHÔNG thể quay trở lại CÂU TRƯỚC. Chúc bạn thành công!  


Questions and Answers
  • 1. 
    Bạn hiểu như thế nào về lĩnh vực kinh doan của Officience và về công việc bạn đang ứng tuyển ? (150 từ)  
  • 2. 
    Nhấp vào đây để đọc tài liệu. Đây là tài liệu về một bất động sản. Bạn hãy đọc và lấy ra thông tin được hỏi dưới đây. Chú ý khi trả lời câu hỏi, bạn phải theo đúng cách nhập thông tin theo hướng dẫn này   Theo tài liệu này thì "1_State" là:  
  • 3. 
    Nhấp vào đây để đọc tài liệu. Đây là tài liệu về một bất động sản. Bạn hãy đọc và lấy ra thông tin được hỏi dưới đây. Chú ý khi trả lời câu hỏi, bạn phải theo đúng cách nhập thông tin theo hướng dẫn này   Theo tài liệu này thì "4_Deed Category" là:  
  • 4. 
    Vẫn là tài liệu và hướng dẫn của câu trước. Nhấp vào đây nếu bạn cần mở lại: tài liệu, hướng dẫn Theo tài liệu này thì "5_Document Number" là:  
  • 5. 
    Vẫn là tài liệu và hướng dẫn của câu trước. Nhấp vào đây nếu bạn cần mở lại: tài liệu, hướng dẫn Theo tài liệu này thì "6_Recording Date" là:  
  • 6. 
    Vẫn là tài liệu và hướng dẫn của câu trước. Nhấp vào đây nếu bạn cần mở lại: tài liệu, hướng dẫn Theo tài liệu này thì "10_Buyer/Borrower/Defendant 1 First Name" là:  
  • 7. 
    Vẫn là tài liệu và hướng dẫn của câu trước. Nhấp vào đây nếu bạn cần mở lại: tài liệu, hướng dẫn Theo tài liệu này thì "11_Buyer/Borrower/Defendant 1 Last Name" là:  
  • 8. 
    Vẫn là tài liệu và hướng dẫn của câu trước. Nhấp vào đây nếu bạn cần mở lại: tài liệu, hướng dẫn Theo tài liệu này thì "13_Buyer/Borrower Street Addre" là:  
  • 9. 
    Vẫn là tài liệu và hướng dẫn của câu trước. Nhấp vào đây nếu bạn cần mở lại: tài liệu, hướng dẫn Theo tài liệu này thì "15_Buyer/Borrower Zip Code" là:  
  • 10. 
    Vẫn là tài liệu và hướng dẫn của câu trước. Nhấp vào đây nếu bạn cần mở lại: tài liệu, hướng dẫn Theo tài liệu này thì "16_Buyer/Borrower City" là:  
  • 11. 
    Vẫn là tài liệu và hướng dẫn của câu trước. Nhấp vào đây nếu bạn cần mở lại: tài liệu, hướng dẫn Theo tài liệu này thì "17_Buyer/Borrower State" là:  
  • 12. 
    Read this text "Almost every fashion label outside the top super-luxury brands is either already manufacturing in Asia or thinking of it. Coach, the US leather goods maker, is a classic example. Over the past five years, it has lifted all its gross margins by manufacturing solely in low-cost markets. In March 2002, it closed its factory in Lares, Puerto Rico, its last company-owned plant, and out sources all its products. Burberry has many Asian licensing arrangements. In 2000 it decided to renew Sanyo’s Japanese license for ten years. This means that almost half of Burberry’s sales at retail value will continue to be produced under license in Asia. At the same time however, Japanese consumers prefer the group’s European-made products. Sanyo is now reacting to this demand for a snob alternative to the Burberry products made in its factories across Asia by opening a flagship store in Tokyo’s Ginza, where it sells Burberry products imported from Europe. In interviews with the FT, many executives say the top luxury brands will continue to be seen, particularly in Asia, as European. Domenico Se Sole of Gucci says: “The Asian consumer really does believe – whether it’s true or not – that luxury comes from Europe and must be made there to be best.” Serge Weinberg, Chief Executive of Pinault Printemps Redoute, which controls Gucci, says it will not move Gucci’s production offshore. Yet some in the industry recognize that change may be round the corner even for the super-luxury brands. Patrizio Bertelli, Chief Executive of Prada, says: “The “Made in Italy” label is important but what we are really offering is a style, and style is an expression of culture”. He therefore recognizes that quality fashion items may not always need to be produced in Italy. Amitava Chattopadhyay, Professor of Marketing at Insead, the business school, says: “A brand is a set of associations in the mind of the consumer and one of these is the country of origin. For luxury goods, the role of the brand is crucial. To damage it is a cardinal sin and no brand manager will want to get the balance between manufacturing location and the brand image wrong.”   According to the above article, is the following statement true or false ? "Coach no longer has a factory in Puerto Rico"  
    • A. 

      True

    • B. 

      False

  • 13. 
    Same text (below) According to the article, is the following statement true or false ? "Coach, like many other companies, is outsourcing its products to reduce costs." --- "Almost every fashion label outside the top super-luxury brands is either already manufacturing in Asia or thinking of it. Coach, the US leather goods maker, is a classic example. Over the past five years, it has lifted all its gross margins by manufacturing solely in low-cost markets. In March 2002, it closed its factory in Lares, Puerto Rico, its last company-owned plant, and out sources all its products. Burberry has many Asian licensing arrangements. In 2000 it decided to renew Sanyo’s Japanese license for ten years. This means that almost half of Burberry’s sales at retail value will continue to be produced under license in Asia. At the same time however, Japanese consumers prefer the group’s European-made products. Sanyo is now reacting to this demand for a snob alternative to the Burberry products made in its factories across Asia by opening a flagship store in Tokyo’s Ginza, where it sells Burberry products imported from Europe. In interviews with the FT, many executives say the top luxury brands will continue to be seen, particularly in Asia, as European. Domenico Se Sole of Gucci says: “The Asian consumer really does believe – whether it’s true or not – that luxury comes from Europe and must be made there to be best.” Serge Weinberg, Chief Executive of Pinault Printemps Redoute, which controls Gucci, says it will not move Gucci’s production offshore. Yet some in the industry recognize that change may be round the corner even for the super-luxury brands. Patrizio Bertelli, Chief Executive of Prada, says: “The “Made in Italy” label is important but what we are really offering is a style, and style is an expression of culture”. He therefore recognizes that quality fashion items may not always need to be produced in Italy. Amitava Chattopadhyay, Professor of Marketing at Insead, the business school, says: “A brand is a set of associations in the mind of the consumer and one of these is the country of origin. For luxury goods, the role of the brand is crucial. To damage it is a cardinal sin and no brand manager will want to get the balance between manufacturing location and the brand image wrong.”  
    • A. 

      True

    • B. 

      False

  • 14. 
    Same text (below) According to the article, is the following statement true or false ? "Some Japanese people choose to buy Burberry products made in Europe rather than in Japan." --- "Almost every fashion label outside the top super-luxury brands is either already manufacturing in Asia or thinking of it. Coach, the US leather goods maker, is a classic example. Over the past five years, it has lifted all its gross margins by manufacturing solely in low-cost markets. In March 2002, it closed its factory in Lares, Puerto Rico, its last company-owned plant, and out sources all its products. Burberry has many Asian licensing arrangements. In 2000 it decided to renew Sanyo’s Japanese license for ten years. This means that almost half of Burberry’s sales at retail value will continue to be produced under license in Asia. At the same time however, Japanese consumers prefer the group’s European-made products. Sanyo is now reacting to this demand for a snob alternative to the Burberry products made in its factories across Asia by opening a flagship store in Tokyo’s Ginza, where it sells Burberry products imported from Europe. In interviews with the FT, many executives say the top luxury brands will continue to be seen, particularly in Asia, as European. Domenico Se Sole of Gucci says: “The Asian consumer really does believe – whether it’s true or not – that luxury comes from Europe and must be made there to be best.” Serge Weinberg, Chief Executive of Pinault Printemps Redoute, which controls Gucci, says it will not move Gucci’s production offshore. Yet some in the industry recognize that change may be round the corner even for the super-luxury brands. Patrizio Bertelli, Chief Executive of Prada, says: “The “Made in Italy” label is important but what we are really offering is a style, and style is an expression of culture”. He therefore recognizes that quality fashion items may not always need to be produced in Italy. Amitava Chattopadhyay, Professor of Marketing at Insead, the business school, says: “A brand is a set of associations in the mind of the consumer and one of these is the country of origin. For luxury goods, the role of the brand is crucial. To damage it is a cardinal sin and no brand manager will want to get the balance between manufacturing location and the brand image wrong.”  
    • A. 

      True

    • B. 

      False

  • 15. 
    Same text (below) According to the article, is the following statement true or false ? "Amitava Chattopadhyay says that companies need to pay careful attention to where they manufacture their products." --- "Almost every fashion label outside the top super-luxury brands is either already manufacturing in Asia or thinking of it. Coach, the US leather goods maker, is a classic example. Over the past five years, it has lifted all its gross margins by manufacturing solely in low-cost markets. In March 2002, it closed its factory in Lares, Puerto Rico, its last company-owned plant, and out sources all its products. Burberry has many Asian licensing arrangements. In 2000 it decided to renew Sanyo’s Japanese license for ten years. This means that almost half of Burberry’s sales at retail value will continue to be produced under license in Asia. At the same time however, Japanese consumers prefer the group’s European-made products. Sanyo is now reacting to this demand for a snob alternative to the Burberry products made in its factories across Asia by opening a flagship store in Tokyo’s Ginza, where it sells Burberry products imported from Europe. In interviews with the FT, many executives say the top luxury brands will continue to be seen, particularly in Asia, as European. Domenico Se Sole of Gucci says: “The Asian consumer really does believe – whether it’s true or not – that luxury comes from Europe and must be made there to be best.” Serge Weinberg, Chief Executive of Pinault Printemps Redoute, which controls Gucci, says it will not move Gucci’s production offshore. Yet some in the industry recognize that change may be round the corner even for the super-luxury brands. Patrizio Bertelli, Chief Executive of Prada, says: “The “Made in Italy” label is important but what we are really offering is a style, and style is an expression of culture”. He therefore recognizes that quality fashion items may not always need to be produced in Italy. Amitava Chattopadhyay, Professor of Marketing at Insead, the business school, says: “A brand is a set of associations in the mind of the consumer and one of these is the country of origin. For luxury goods, the role of the brand is crucial. To damage it is a cardinal sin and no brand manager will want to get the balance between manufacturing location and the brand image wrong.”  
    • A. 

      True

    • B. 

      False

  • 16. 
    Same text (below) According to the article, is the following statement true or false ? "Patrizio Bertelli believes that luxury fashion products should always be made in Europe." --- "Almost every fashion label outside the top super-luxury brands is either already manufacturing in Asia or thinking of it. Coach, the US leather goods maker, is a classic example. Over the past five years, it has lifted all its gross margins by manufacturing solely in low-cost markets. In March 2002, it closed its factory in Lares, Puerto Rico, its last company-owned plant, and out sources all its products. Burberry has many Asian licensing arrangements. In 2000 it decided to renew Sanyo’s Japanese license for ten years. This means that almost half of Burberry’s sales at retail value will continue to be produced under license in Asia. At the same time however, Japanese consumers prefer the group’s European-made products. Sanyo is now reacting to this demand for a snob alternative to the Burberry products made in its factories across Asia by opening a flagship store in Tokyo’s Ginza, where it sells Burberry products imported from Europe. In interviews with the FT, many executives say the top luxury brands will continue to be seen, particularly in Asia, as European. Domenico Se Sole of Gucci says: “The Asian consumer really does believe – whether it’s true or not – that luxury comes from Europe and must be made there to be best.” Serge Weinberg, Chief Executive of Pinault Printemps Redoute, which controls Gucci, says it will not move Gucci’s production offshore. Yet some in the industry recognize that change may be round the corner even for the super-luxury brands. Patrizio Bertelli, Chief Executive of Prada, says: “The “Made in Italy” label is important but what we are really offering is a style, and style is an expression of culture”. He therefore recognizes that quality fashion items may not always need to be produced in Italy. Amitava Chattopadhyay, Professor of Marketing at Insead, the business school, says: “A brand is a set of associations in the mind of the consumer and one of these is the country of origin. For luxury goods, the role of the brand is crucial. To damage it is a cardinal sin and no brand manager will want to get the balance between manufacturing location and the brand image wrong.”  
    • A. 

      True

    • B. 

      False

  • 17. 
    Same text (below) According to the article, is the following statement true or false ? "Gucci is planning to outsource some of its products." --- "Almost every fashion label outside the top super-luxury brands is either already manufacturing in Asia or thinking of it. Coach, the US leather goods maker, is a classic example. Over the past five years, it has lifted all its gross margins by manufacturing solely in low-cost markets. In March 2002, it closed its factory in Lares, Puerto Rico, its last company-owned plant, and out sources all its products. Burberry has many Asian licensing arrangements. In 2000 it decided to renew Sanyo’s Japanese license for ten years. This means that almost half of Burberry’s sales at retail value will continue to be produced under license in Asia. At the same time however, Japanese consumers prefer the group’s European-made products. Sanyo is now reacting to this demand for a snob alternative to the Burberry products made in its factories across Asia by opening a flagship store in Tokyo’s Ginza, where it sells Burberry products imported from Europe. In interviews with the FT, many executives say the top luxury brands will continue to be seen, particularly in Asia, as European. Domenico Se Sole of Gucci says: “The Asian consumer really does believe – whether it’s true or not – that luxury comes from Europe and must be made there to be best.” Serge Weinberg, Chief Executive of Pinault Printemps Redoute, which controls Gucci, says it will not move Gucci’s production offshore. Yet some in the industry recognize that change may be round the corner even for the super-luxury brands. Patrizio Bertelli, Chief Executive of Prada, says: “The “Made in Italy” label is important but what we are really offering is a style, and style is an expression of culture”. He therefore recognizes that quality fashion items may not always need to be produced in Italy. Amitava Chattopadhyay, Professor of Marketing at Insead, the business school, says: “A brand is a set of associations in the mind of the consumer and one of these is the country of origin. For luxury goods, the role of the brand is crucial. To damage it is a cardinal sin and no brand manager will want to get the balance between manufacturing location and the brand image wrong.”  
    • A. 

      True

    • B. 

      False

  • 18. 
    Same text (below) According to the article, is the following statement true or false ? "Sanyo’s store in Tokyo sells Burberry products made only in Asia." --- "Almost every fashion label outside the top super-luxury brands is either already manufacturing in Asia or thinking of it. Coach, the US leather goods maker, is a classic example. Over the past five years, it has lifted all its gross margins by manufacturing solely in low-cost markets. In March 2002, it closed its factory in Lares, Puerto Rico, its last company-owned plant, and out sources all its products. Burberry has many Asian licensing arrangements. In 2000 it decided to renew Sanyo’s Japanese license for ten years. This means that almost half of Burberry’s sales at retail value will continue to be produced under license in Asia. At the same time however, Japanese consumers prefer the group’s European-made products. Sanyo is now reacting to this demand for a snob alternative to the Burberry products made in its factories across Asia by opening a flagship store in Tokyo’s Ginza, where it sells Burberry products imported from Europe. In interviews with the FT, many executives say the top luxury brands will continue to be seen, particularly in Asia, as European. Domenico Se Sole of Gucci says: “The Asian consumer really does believe – whether it’s true or not – that luxury comes from Europe and must be made there to be best.” Serge Weinberg, Chief Executive of Pinault Printemps Redoute, which controls Gucci, says it will not move Gucci’s production offshore. Yet some in the industry recognize that change may be round the corner even for the super-luxury brands. Patrizio Bertelli, Chief Executive of Prada, says: “The “Made in Italy” label is important but what we are really offering is a style, and style is an expression of culture”. He therefore recognizes that quality fashion items may not always need to be produced in Italy. Amitava Chattopadhyay, Professor of Marketing at Insead, the business school, says: “A brand is a set of associations in the mind of the consumer and one of these is the country of origin. For luxury goods, the role of the brand is crucial. To damage it is a cardinal sin and no brand manager will want to get the balance between manufacturing location and the brand image wrong.”  
    • A. 

      True

    • B. 

      False

  • 19. 
    Same text (below) According to the article, is the following statement true or false ? "According to Domenico De Sole, the best luxury products are made in Japan." --- "Almost every fashion label outside the top super-luxury brands is either already manufacturing in Asia or thinking of it. Coach, the US leather goods maker, is a classic example. Over the past five years, it has lifted all its gross margins by manufacturing solely in low-cost markets. In March 2002, it closed its factory in Lares, Puerto Rico, its last company-owned plant, and out sources all its products. Burberry has many Asian licensing arrangements. In 2000 it decided to renew Sanyo’s Japanese license for ten years. This means that almost half of Burberry’s sales at retail value will continue to be produced under license in Asia. At the same time however, Japanese consumers prefer the group’s European-made products. Sanyo is now reacting to this demand for a snob alternative to the Burberry products made in its factories across Asia by opening a flagship store in Tokyo’s Ginza, where it sells Burberry products imported from Europe. In interviews with the FT, many executives say the top luxury brands will continue to be seen, particularly in Asia, as European. Domenico Se Sole of Gucci says: “The Asian consumer really does believe – whether it’s true or not – that luxury comes from Europe and must be made there to be best.” Serge Weinberg, Chief Executive of Pinault Printemps Redoute, which controls Gucci, says it will not move Gucci’s production offshore. Yet some in the industry recognize that change may be round the corner even for the super-luxury brands. Patrizio Bertelli, Chief Executive of Prada, says: “The “Made in Italy” label is important but what we are really offering is a style, and style is an expression of culture”. He therefore recognizes that quality fashion items may not always need to be produced in Italy. Amitava Chattopadhyay, Professor of Marketing at Insead, the business school, says: “A brand is a set of associations in the mind of the consumer and one of these is the country of origin. For luxury goods, the role of the brand is crucial. To damage it is a cardinal sin and no brand manager will want to get the balance between manufacturing location and the brand image wrong.”  
    • A. 

      True

    • B. 

      False

  • 20. 
    Same text (below) Choose the best summary of the above article --- "Almost every fashion label outside the top super-luxury brands is either already manufacturing in Asia or thinking of it. Coach, the US leather goods maker, is a classic example. Over the past five years, it has lifted all its gross margins by manufacturing solely in low-cost markets. In March 2002, it closed its factory in Lares, Puerto Rico, its last company-owned plant, and out sources all its products. Burberry has many Asian licensing arrangements. In 2000 it decided to renew Sanyo’s Japanese license for ten years. This means that almost half of Burberry’s sales at retail value will continue to be produced under license in Asia. At the same time however, Japanese consumers prefer the group’s European-made products. Sanyo is now reacting to this demand for a snob alternative to the Burberry products made in its factories across Asia by opening a flagship store in Tokyo’s Ginza, where it sells Burberry products imported from Europe. In interviews with the FT, many executives say the top luxury brands will continue to be seen, particularly in Asia, as European. Domenico Se Sole of Gucci says: “The Asian consumer really does believe – whether it’s true or not – that luxury comes from Europe and must be made there to be best.” Serge Weinberg, Chief Executive of Pinault Printemps Redoute, which controls Gucci, says it will not move Gucci’s production offshore. Yet some in the industry recognize that change may be round the corner even for the super-luxury brands. Patrizio Bertelli, Chief Executive of Prada, says: “The “Made in Italy” label is important but what we are really offering is a style, and style is an expression of culture”. He therefore recognizes that quality fashion items may not always need to be produced in Italy. Amitava Chattopadhyay, Professor of Marketing at Insead, the business school, says: “A brand is a set of associations in the mind of the consumer and one of these is the country of origin. For luxury goods, the role of the brand is crucial. To damage it is a cardinal sin and no brand manager will want to get the balance between manufacturing location and the brand image wrong.”  
    • A. 

      Most manufacturers of luxury brands do not wish to produce their goods in low-cost countries because they believe that it will damage their brand image.

    • B. 

      Most manufacturers of top brands now produce their goods in low-cost countries. Consumers no longer care about where the products are manufactured.

    • C. 

      Asian consumers think that European luxury goods are of high quality. The current trend of making such goods in Asia could damage the reputation of these luxury brands.

  • 21. 
    6 people meet for a business lunch. Each person shakes hands once with each other person present. How many handshakes take place?  
    • A. 

      30

    • B. 

      21

    • C. 

      18

    • D. 

      15

    • E. 

      10

  • 22. 
    Two equal circles are cut out of a rectangle of card of dimensions 16 by 8. The circles have the maximum diameter possible. What is the approximate area of the paper remaining after the circles have been cut out?   
    • A. 

      104

    • B. 

      78

    • C. 

      54

    • D. 

      27

    • E. 

      13

  • 23. 
    The price of a cycle is reduced by 25 per cent. The new price is reduced by a further 20 per cent. The two reductions together are equal to a single reduction of :  
    • A. 

      45%

    • B. 

      40%

    • C. 

      35%

    • D. 

      32.5%

    • E. 

      30%

  • 24. 
    What is the average (arithmetic mean) of all the multiples of ten from 10 to 190 inclusive?   
    • A. 

      90

    • B. 

      95

    • C. 

      100

    • D. 

      105

    • E. 

      110

  • 25. 
    Amy has to visit towns B and C in any order. The roads connecting these towns with her home are shown on the diagram. How many different routes can she take starting from A and returning to A, going through both B and C and not travelling any road twice on the same trip?  
    • A. 

      10

    • B. 

      8

    • C. 

      6

    • D. 

      4

    • E. 

      2

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