How Much You Know About Symbiotic Relationships? Trivia Quiz

12 Questions | Total Attempts: 341

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How Much You Know About Symbiotic Relationships? Trivia Quiz

Symbiotic Relationships are relationships between two different species that spend time together. This relationship can either end up in one taking all the benefits, they all get benefits, or one tends to get more from the relationship than the other. How much you know about symbiotic relationships? Do take this quiz and see which type of relationship exists in the examples given.


Questions and Answers
  • 1. 
    Protozoa and termites - Much like the digestive bacteria in human digestive systems, protozoa help termites to digest the food that they eat.
    • A. 

      Mutualism

    • B. 

      Commensalism

    • C. 

      Parasitism

  • 2. 
    Sea anemones and clownfish - Clownfish are often found living amongst the tentacles of the sea anemone. While those tentacles are able to sting nearly all other fish, the clownfish, thanks to the mucus on its skin, is protected from the stinging.
    • A. 

      Mutualism

    • B. 

      Commensalism

    • C. 

      Parasitism

  • 3. 
    Spider crab and algae - With the ocean as its habitat, spider crabs often spend their time in some of the most shallow areas of the sea making them highly visible to predators. However, living on their backs are algae that act as camouflage.
    • A. 

      Mutualism

    • B. 

      Commensalism

    • C. 

      Parasitism

  • 4. 
    Flowers and bees - Bees and flowers have a mutualistic relationship as well. Bees get the nectar they need to make honey by traveling between flowers. The bee brings pollen from one plant to another, resulting in pollination.
    • A. 

      Mutualism

    • B. 

      Commensalism

    • C. 

      Parasitism

  • 5. 
    Ants and fungus - Ants actively create fungus, sometimes using leaves and their own fecal matter. Once the fungus grows, the ants eat it to sustain life.
    • A. 

      Mutualism

    • B. 

      Commensalism

    • C. 

      Parasitism

  • 6. 
    Gobies - These small fish live on sea animals, often changing color to blend in. The presence of a goby offers no benefit to its host, but it gains protection and access to food.
    • A. 

      Mutualism

    • B. 

      Commensalism

    • C. 

      Parasitism

  • 7. 
    Golden jackals that are no longer in a pack will follow tigers in order to feed on the remains of their kills. The tigers gain no benefit nor receive any harm from the presence of the golden jackals, but the latter get to enjoy a meal.
    • A. 

      Mutualism

    • B. 

      Commensalism

    • C. 

      Parasitism

  • 8. 
    Hermit crabs - These crabs live inside the shells of dead snails. 
    • A. 

      Mutualism

    • B. 

      Commensalism

    • C. 

      Parasitism

  • 9. 
    Seedlings In the desert, plant seedlings (and pretty much everything else) can struggle to find enough water to survive. That's where nurse plants come in. Nurse plants create shade and shelter, protecting seedlings from both predators and the sun. Nurse plants gain no particular benefit from the presence of the seedlings, but the seedling would die without them.
    • A. 

      Mutualism

    • B. 

      Commensalism

    • C. 

      Parasitism

  • 10. 
    Bedbugs - Thirty years ago, it seemed bedbugs were a solved problem. But life finds away. In the past few decades, bedbugs have made a spectacular comeback. These near-invisible insects feed on human blood through a sharp proboscis they cheerfully sink into any exposed skin.
    • A. 

      Mutualism

    • B. 

      Commensalism

    • C. 

      Parasitism

  • 11. 
    Pulex irritans (Fleas): Meet the human flea. It's happy to chew on just about anything with warm blood, but humans hold a special place in its horrible little heart. On their own, they're just itchy, but they become a whole new problem when there's a disease going around. P. irritans is infamous as the human vector for the Black Death, the dreaded bubonic plague that hopped happily from rats to humans and back again.
    • A. 

      Mutualism

    • B. 

      Commensalism

    • C. 

      Parasitism

  • 12. 
    (Spider hawk wasps): These parasitic stinging insects come by their name honestly. Ordinarily solitary predators, when a female hawk wasp is ready to lay eggs, it parasitizes a spider, stinging and paralyzing it with venom, then laying eggs in its body. Baby wasps then hatch and eat the still-living spider alive. Scary stuff.
    • A. 

      Mutualism

    • B. 

      Commensalism

    • C. 

      Parasitism

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