Style Gourmet Total Foodie Cooking Techniques Certification Exam

50 Questions
Style Gourmet Total Foodie Cooking Techniques Certification Exam

Food/wine writer and James Beard Award nominee Elliot Essman, CSW, CSS, has designed the Style Gourmet Certified Total Foodie tests to cover a wide range of food expertise areas. These fifty questions test your knowledge in the area of Cooking Techniques.

Sample Question

Which statement about roasting and baking is NOT true?

Roasting may involve the addition of cooking fats and baking rarely does.

Both roasting and baking usually subject food to a constant temperature.

Vegetables may be roasted but not baked.

Meats may be either roasted or baked.

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Questions and Answers
  • 1. 
    • A. 

      Roasting may involve the addition of cooking fats and baking rarely does.

    • B. 

      Both roasting and baking usually subject food to a constant temperature.

    • C. 

      Vegetables may be roasted but not baked.

    • D. 

      Meats may be either roasted or baked.

  • 2. 
    In French cooking, a court-bouillon is usually:
    • A. 

      A flavored liquid for poaching foods.

    • B. 

      A rich soup or bisque, named after the court of Louis IV.

    • C. 

      A savory jellied vegetable dish or aspic, often laced with herbs.

    • D. 

      A salad dressing featuring olives, garlic and fresh Mediterranean herbs.

  • 3. 
    As to the terms marinate and macerate:
    • A. 

      They both refer to the process of soaking ingredients in liquid to add flavor and improve texture.

    • B. 

      Marinate connotes soaking a protein in a seasoned, often acidic liquid.

    • C. 

      Macerate connotes soaking a non–protein, a fruit or vegetable, in a light liquid, its own juice, or simply some sprinkled sugar.

    • D. 

      All of the above.

  • 4. 
    The sous-vide process:
    • A. 

      Is a vacuum drying method of preserving foods, especially fruit.

    • B. 

      Calls for cooking food in a sealed bag immersed in a controlled temperature water bath.

    • C. 

      Is a method of roasting poultry without resort to basting.

    • D. 

      Is a method of dry-curing olives, cucumbers, and other vegetables.

  • 5. 
    If a recipe calls for Herbes de Provence, which of these herbs would be on the list?
    • A. 

      Thyme

    • B. 

      Cilantro

    • C. 

      Cumin

    • D. 

      Dill

  • 6. 
    A blanquette is a stew made from chicken, veal or lamb that has not been previously browned or fried.
    • A. 

      True

    • B. 

      False

  • 7. 
    Braising meat:
    • A. 

      Involves slow cooking the meat in liquid.

    • B. 

      Is an ideal method of getting the most tenderness out of inexpensive cuts of meat.

    • C. 

      May initially involve dry cooking techniques such as searing.

    • D. 

      All of the above.

  • 8. 
    The process of quickly plunging a vegetable into boiling water and then halting the cooking process by immersing into cold water is called:
    • A. 

      Blanching

    • B. 

      Coupe de l’eau

    • C. 

      Immersion

    • D. 

      Haute de vide

  • 9. 
    • A. 

      Metaxa

    • B. 

      Mezzaluna

    • C. 

      Manteca

    • D. 

      Meshugga

  • 10. 
    When you coddle a food such as an egg, you:
    • A. 

      Use a spoon to repeatedly baste it in butter or oil from the pan.

    • B. 

      Simmer it for a steady period of time, constantly stirring.

    • C. 

      Heat it in water kept just below the boiling point.

    • D. 

      Deep fry it at a relatively low temperature.

  • 11. 
    The term “blind baking” refers to:
    • A. 

      The practice of not opening an oven to check doneness so as to maintain even heating.

    • B. 

      The process of prebaking a pastry crust alone, without a filling, often using some kind of weight to prevent bubbling of the crust.

    • C. 

      The process of baking meats or fish in an egg white and salt crust meant to be broken off and discarded before serving.

    • D. 

      In Mexico, the process of baking meats wrapped in banana leaves in an oven (horno) whose opening is temporarily sealed with clay, thus trapping the heat.

  • 12. 
    The French term concassé refers to:
    • A. 

      Rough chopping of ingredients, often tomatoes.

    • B. 

      It is the equivalent of shredding, as with salad greens.

    • C. 

      Fine dicing of vegetables.

    • D. 

      Reducing a broth.

  • 13. 
    A pressure cooker:
    • A. 

      Allows foods to be cooked at lower temperatures, preserving flavors and textures.

    • B. 

      Often “pressures away” minerals and vitamins, yielding food with lower nutritional value.

    • C. 

      Requires a greater level of liquid than conventional boiling or braising vessels.

    • D. 

      None of the above.

  • 14. 
    In southern cooking. smothering meat:
    • A. 

      Calls for cooking on a stovetop in a covered pan with a small amount of liquid.

    • B. 

      Usually does not involve an initial browning.

    • C. 

      Is synonymous with pan-frying in butter or pork fat (oil is never used).

    • D. 

      Applies to any technique in which meat, chicken or fish is breaded or battered, however prepared.

  • 15. 
    The process of sautéing food requires:
    • A. 

      A deep pan.

    • B. 

      Long cooking times.

    • C. 

      Relatively high heat.

    • D. 

      Thick cut pieces of meat or vegetables.

  • 16. 
    The process of using a liquid like wine to dissolve browned food residue in order to make a sauce is called:
    • A. 

      Glazing

    • B. 

      Glace

    • C. 

      Pan dripping

    • D. 

      Deglazing

  • 17. 
    • A. 

      Maillard reaction

    • B. 

      Glycogen reaction

    • C. 

      Thermite reaction

    • D. 

      Oxidative reaction

  • 18. 
    To create a gratin, you must use cheese.
    • A. 

      True

    • B. 

      False

  • 19. 
    Fruits and vegetables often work best with home canning because their high acidity allows them to be sterilized in an ordinary boiling water bath, i.e., without extra pressure or machinery.
    • A. 

      True

    • B. 

      False

  • 20. 
    The process of gently simmering a delicate food in milk, stock, water or wine is called:
    • A. 

      Caramelization

    • B. 

      Poaching

    • C. 

      Steeping

    • D. 

      Setting

  • 21. 
    • A. 

      A paper cone filled with icing and used for decorating cakes.

    • B. 

      A type of delicate filigree decoration with icing on fancy wedding cakes.

    • C. 

      A method for smoking fish, particularly salmon.

    • D. 

      A concentrated fish stock used for flavoring sauces.

  • 22. 
    Food-borne pathogens are more likely to survive freezing than boiling.
    • A. 

      True

    • B. 

      False

  • 23. 
    The French flavor base called a mirepoix is most commonly a combination of chopped:
    • A. 

      Celery, carrots and garlic.

    • B. 

      Celery, carrots and onions.

    • C. 

      Green bell pepper, carrots and onions.

    • D. 

      Onions, garlic, and tomato.

  • 24. 
    The process of laying strips of bacon or other fat over a roast to add fat content (say, with low fat game meats) is called:
    • A. 

      Marbling

    • B. 

      Fatback

    • C. 

      Barding

    • D. 

      Garniture

  • 25. 
    In broiling heat is transferred to the food by:
    • A. 

      Direct conduction.

    • B. 

      Thermal radiation.

    • C. 

      Transient conduction.

    • D. 

      The cothermal reaction.

  • 26. 
    The act of searing a protein ingredient:
    • A. 

      Has been definitively proven to “seal in the juices.”

    • B. 

      Adds color, but rarely adds flavor.

    • C. 

      Adds both color and flavor, due to the Maillard reaction and caramelization.

    • D. 

      Is always just a preliminary process, since the center must be cooked by other means.

  • 27. 
    • A. 

      Aromatic vegetables like onions, carrots and celery.

    • B. 

      Bones.

    • C. 

      Herbs like parsley, thyme and bay leaf.

    • D. 

      A stock has a greater salt content than a broth.

  • 28. 
    If you added egg whites to clarify a chicken stock, you would skim off the:
    • A. 

      Consommé

    • B. 

      Mise en place

    • C. 

      Chaud-froid

    • D. 

      Raft

  • 29. 
    A meat marinade composed of pineapple and papaya is:
    • A. 

      An acidic marinade.

    • B. 

      An enzymatic marinade.

    • C. 

      A tropical brine (sea foam) marinade.

    • D. 

      A Hawaiian marinade.

  • 30. 
    In French cooking, beurre manié is:
    • A. 

      A flour and butter mixture used for thickening stews and soups.

    • B. 

      A smooth, creamy, butter-rich soup, often seafood-based.

    • C. 

      A 500-gram block of butter.

    • D. 

      A browned butter sauce, often with capers and shallots.

  • 31. 
    • A. 

      Extra leavening is necessary, because rising is slower.

    • B. 

      Extra liquids are required, since the boiling point of water is lower than at sea level.

    • C. 

      Extra sweetening is often called for, to maintain structure.

    • D. 

      Baking in two stages will increase the chance of having a cake that will not collapse.

  • 32. 
    In copper cookware:
    • A. 

      The tin lining provides better heat conduction.

    • B. 

      The tin lining reduces the cost of the cookware.

    • C. 

      The tin lining prevents the copper from reacting with high acid foods like tomatoes.

    • D. 

      The tin lining promotes whipping egg whites in order to create meringues.

  • 33. 
    Double-acting baking power:
    • A. 

      Is twice as powerful as single-acting baking powder, so only half as much is needed.

    • B. 

      Is used primarily in commercial baking applications, since it is too powerful for home use.

    • C. 

      Produces bubbles when ingredients are mixed, and also promotes rising when heated.

    • D. 

      Combines baking soda, an acid, and also has a yeast component for reliable leavening.

  • 34. 
    For most meringues, egg whites need to be whipped:
    • A. 

      To the soft peak stage.

    • B. 

      To the mid peak stage.

    • C. 

      To the firm peak stage.

    • D. 

      To the stiff peak stage.

  • 35. 
    The white of eggs is more widely used as an emulsifier (for example, to keep sauces together), than the yolk.
    • A. 

      True

    • B. 

      False

  • 36. 
    The Latin American dish called ceviche (or cebiche) is made by:
    • A. 

      Marinating fish in citrus juices, with spices and aromatics, followed by grilling or steaming.

    • B. 

      Marinating fish in citrus juices, with seasoning and aromatics, but without further cooking.

    • C. 

      First poaching or frying fish, then marinating it in a vinegar or citrus sauce before serving.

    • D. 

      Marinating chunks of meat with tropical fruits and citrus juices, and then giving them a quick sauté before serving hot.

  • 37. 
    In a vinaigrette, what keeps the oil and vinegar together in an emulsion?
    • A. 

      The blend of herbs and shallots (or onions), binds both oil and vinegar.

    • B. 

      A small amount of whipped egg white, to add lecithin.

    • C. 

      Brisk whisking (necessitating immediate serving before the emulsion breaks down).

    • D. 

      The edge of a teaspoon of mayonnaise (the Nid d'Abeille technique).

  • 38. 
    Despite being easy to clean, non-stick pans are often unsuitable for the creation of sauces that require food particles to stick to the pan before deglazing.
    • A. 

      True

    • B. 

      False

  • 39. 
    In a two-step process of bread baking, when a small portion of dough is allowed to ferment with yeast before taking its place in the final dough, that portion is called:
    • A. 

      The sponge

    • B. 

      A sourdough starter

    • C. 

      Proto-gluten

    • D. 

      The barm

  • 40. 
    A fish filet prepared using the meunière method might be:
    • A. 

      Steamed with aromatic vegetables.

    • B. 

      Batter dipped and deep fried in oil, as in fish and chips.

    • C. 

      Baked in a pastry shell.

    • D. 

      Dredged in seasoned flour and pan fried in butter.

  • 41. 
    A double boiler or bain-marie may be used:
    • A. 

      To avoid direct application of heat, as in melting chocolate or making a Hollandaise sauce.

    • B. 

      To act as or replace a chafing dish to keep foods warm for extended periods of time.

    • C. 

      In cooking custards to prevent a crust from forming before the center is done.

    • D. 

      All of the above.

  • 42. 
    The danger zone in which bacteria pose the greatest threat to meat, eggs, fish, and other foods is the temperature range between approximately 40° to 140°F or 4° to 60°C.
    • A. 

      True

    • B. 

      False

  • 43. 
    Pickling of foods:
    • A. 

      Must be done in a completely sterile environment.

    • B. 

      Can be accomplished using either brine or an acid-rich solution like vinegar.

    • C. 

      Involves an aerobic form of fermentation.

    • D. 

      Requires the addition of moderate amounts of heat to kill harmful microorganisms and encourage flavor formation.

  • 44. 
    When flambéing a dish:
    • A. 

      A chef will usually use wine, since it adds its own desirable flavor.

    • B. 

      The food must be actively simmering and in contact with the stove.

    • C. 

      Although often used, alcohol is not a strict requirement, as long as the dish bursts into flame.

    • D. 

      Alcohol is necessary, because of the way it reacts chemically when burned.

  • 45. 
    • A. 

      Cornstarch: consistency

    • B. 

      Wine: texture

    • C. 

      Chopped garlic: emulsifier

    • D. 

      Salt: moisture retention

  • 46. 
    The pan we call a saucepan:
    • A. 

      Is generally as high as it is wide and has a single handle.

    • B. 

      Is not best for actual sauce making because its straight sides make it difficult to whisk the sauce.

    • C. 

      Is not preferable for actual sauce making because its straight sides do not facilitate the evaporation needed to reduce a sauce.

    • D. 

      All of the above.

  • 47. 
    In Italy, a veal shank braised in white wine and garlic might be called:
    • A. 

      Vitello piccata

    • B. 

      Vitello ossobuco

    • C. 

      Vitello tonnato

    • D. 

      Vitello marsala

  • 48. 
    • A. 

      A skillet has sloped sides and a sauté pan has straight sides.

    • B. 

      A sauté pan is better for reducing sauces, while a skillet is better for pan-frying.

    • C. 

      A skillet has a larger contact area with the stove than a sauté pan of the same diameter.

    • D. 

      For most purposes, the terms skillet and frying pan are synonymous.

  • 49. 
    • A. 

      To enhanced the ability of the surface of the pan to resist sticking.

    • B. 

      To create a surface layer that discourages rust.

    • C. 

      To prevent food from interacting with the iron in the pan.

    • D. 

      To give the pan greater ability to heat evenly and to retain that heat.

  • 50. 
    • A. 

      Slicing knife

    • B. 

      Boning knife

    • C. 

      Paring knife

    • D. 

      Chef's knife