Social Psychology Quiz Questions And Answers

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Social Psychology Quizzes & Trivia

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Questions and Answers
  • 1. 
    Processes that are conscious, effortful, and purposeful are _____________________.
  • 2. 
    Processes that are outside of consciousness, relatively effortless, and habitual are  _____________________. 
  • 3. 
     _____________________: mental representation(s) capturing the general characteristics of a category of episodes, events, or individuals (event, person, role, self).
  • 4. 
    Your  _____________________ of a grandmother might be an old woman who bakes cookies and gives you lots of hugs.
  • 5. 
     _____________________: schemas that are often negative and are used to categorize complex groups of people.
    • A. 

      Stereotypes

    • B. 

      Prejudices

    • C. 

      Fundamental attribution error

    • D. 

      Cognitive dissonance

  • 6. 
    Stereotypes often lead to the _____________________, the tendency for a member of a group (the in group) to view members of another group (the out-group) as "all alike" or less varied than members of his or her own group.
    • A. 

      Out-group homogeneity effect

    • B. 

      Self-fulfilling prophecies

    • C. 

      Implicit theories of personality

    • D. 

      Self-perception theory

  • 7. 
    _____________________: an inference about what caused a person's behavior.
  • 8. 
    Luke is being rude. We attributed his behavior to the fact that he'd failed a test earlier that day. This is an example of a __________________________.
    • A. 

      Dispositional attribution

    • B. 

      Situational attribution

  • 9. 
    Luke is being rude. We attributed his behavior to his natural disposition. This is an example of a __________________________.
    • A. 

      Situational attribution

    • B. 

      Dispositional attribution

  • 10. 
    Liza dislikes Peter because he is a football player. She has a _________________________ against him. 
  • 11. 
    The United States generally considers people to be fundamentally independent and values standing out by achieving private goals. They are an example of a(n) _________________________ culture.
    • A. 

      Individualistic

    • B. 

      Interdependent

    • C. 

      Collectivist

    • D. 

      Totalitarian

  • 12. 
    People in individualistic cultures tend to make __________________________ attributions about people's behavior.
  • 13. 
    Countries in Latin America generally consider people to be fundamentally interdependent and emphasize obligations within one's family and immediate community. They are an example of a(n) ______________________________ culture.
    • A. 

      Individualistic

    • B. 

      Interdependent

    • C. 

      Collectivist

    • D. 

      Totalitarian

  • 14. 
    People in collectivist cultures tend to make ______________________________ attributions about people's behavior.
  • 15. 
    We assumed Jacob was being mean because he was an apathetic person. Really, Jacob was being mean because his dog had run away earlier in the week and he was upset. Our assumption was an example of a ______________________________.
  • 16. 
    When combating the fundamental attribution error, we must ask ourselves a series of questions to determine if this person's behavior was really the cause of disposition (or if it was, more likely, a result of the situation). Does this person always act this way in this situation? Does this person act this way in other situations? Do other people act this way in this situation? 
    • A. 

      Consistency

    • B. 

      Contingency

    • C. 

      Consensus

    • D. 

      Deliberation

    • E. 

      Distinctiveness

  • 17. 
    Your boss always seems so proper in meetings, so you assume he is a very serious guy. Then one weekend, you are at a lounge and see him dancing on the pool table, and realize he has a bit of a wild streak. This additional information that made you realize his work behavior is not a full reflection of his behavior in other situations is an example of:
    • A. 

      Consistency

    • B. 

      Distinctiveness

    • C. 

      Consensus

  • 18. 
    __________________________: a fairly stable evaluation of something as good or bad that makes a person think, feel, or behave positively or negatively about some person, group, or social issue.
    • A. 

      Attitude

    • B. 

      Prejudice

    • C. 

      Stereotype

    • D. 

      Self-perception theory

  • 19. 
    You hear Marie is outgoing, you remember (falsely) that your friend said she loves crowds (despite the fact that this was never mentioned), this is an example of an __________________________.
    • A. 

      Fundamental attribution error

    • B. 

      Implicit theory of personality

    • C. 

      Self-fulfilling prophecy

    • D. 

      Stereotype

  • 20. 
    __________________________: beliefs about what kinds of behaviors are associated with particular traits and which traits usually go together; used to develop expectations about people's behavior
  • 21. 
    "All Asians are alike" is an example of the __________________________. 
  • 22. 
    "I adamantly support a woman's right to choose to terminate a pregnancy" is an example of a(n) __________________________ about abortion.
    • A. 

      Prejudice

    • B. 

      Bias

    • C. 

      Stereotype

    • D. 

      Attitude

  • 23. 
    "Clarissa changed shampoos because the new shampoo makes her hair smoother" is an example of the __________________________.
    • A. 

      Central route to persuasion

    • B. 

      Peripheral route to persuasion

    • C. 

      Out-group homogeneity effect

    • D. 

      Cognitive dissonance

  • 24. 
    "Clarissa changed shampoos because the spokesperson for the new shampoo is her favorite actress" is an example of the __________________________.
    • A. 

      Central route to persuasion

    • B. 

      Peripheral route to persuasion

    • C. 

      Out-group homogeneity effect

    • D. 

      Cognitive dissonance

  • 25. 
    __________________________: the process involved in attitude change when someone carefully evaluates the evidence and the arguments.
  • 26. 
    __________________________: the process involved in attitude change when someone relies on superficial factors, such as the appearance or charisma of the person presenting the argument.
  • 27. 
    __________________________: an uncomfortable inconsistency among one's actions, beliefs, attitudes, or feelings. People attempt to reduce it by making their actions, beliefs, attitudes, or feelings more consistent with one another.
  • 28. 
    "I'm a compassionate and caring person" but "Yesterday, I didn't help someone who dropped their groceries" is an example of __________________________.
    • A. 

      Self-perception theory

    • B. 

      Cognitive dissonance

    • C. 

      Attitude

    • D. 

      Self-fulfilling prophecy

  • 29. 
    __________________________: the theory that we know our own attitudes and feelings only by observing our own behaviors and deciding what probably caused them, just as we do when trying to understand others.
  • 30. 
    __________________________: beliefs about how a person will behave that actually make the expected behavior more likely.
  • 31. 
    The stereotype threat is an example of a __________________________.
    • A. 

      Self-fulfilling prophecy

    • B. 

      Cognitive dissonance

    • C. 

      Attitude

    • D. 

      Out-group homogeneity effect

  • 32. 
    __________________________: a change in behavior due to explicit or implicit social pressure.
  • 33. 
    Annie starts wearing high heels to school because that's what the popular girls wear. This is an example of __________________________. 
    • A. 

      Obedience

    • B. 

      Compliance

    • C. 

      Conformity

  • 34. 
    Asch's study was an example of __________________________. - participants presented with two cards - a standard line and a few comparison lines - participants were asked to choose which of the comparison lines matched the standard line - one answer was obviously correct - when confederates gave the wrong answer, most participants also gave the wrong answer
    • A. 

      Conformity

    • B. 

      Obedience

    • C. 

      Compliance

  • 35. 
    __________________________: a reason for conformity based on people's desire to be correct.
  • 36. 
    Alice changed her answer to the question after Maggie answered because she wanted to be correct. This is an example of conformity due to a(n) __________________________ influence.
    • A. 

      Informational

    • B. 

      Normative

  • 37. 
    __________________________: a reason for conformity based on people's desire to be liked (or not to appear foolish).
  • 38. 
    Alice changed her answer to the question because she didn't want Maggie and Dave to think she was stupid. This is an example of conformity due to a(n) __________________________ influence.
    • A. 

      Informational

    • B. 

      Normative

  • 39. 
    We are more likely to conform when the group __________________________.
    • A. 

      Is smaller

    • B. 

      Is larger

    • C. 

      Is male

    • D. 

      Is female

  • 40. 
    __________________________: a change in behavior in response to an instruction or command from another person.
  • 41. 
    Stanley Milgram's controversial experiment about the "teacher" and the "learner" was an example of __________________________.
    • A. 

      Conformity

    • B. 

      Obedience

    • C. 

      Compliance

  • 42. 
    __________________________: thinking about the social world in ways that serve an emotional need, such as when people hold beliefs that help them feel less anxious. EX: political conservatism is positively related to a concern with societal instability and death, a need for order and structure, and an intolerance of ambiguity.
  • 43. 
    We are more likely to obey when we __________________________ the victim; we think about a potential victim in ways that make him seem inhuman (as vermin, for example, or as a mere number).
  • 44. 
    __________________________: a change in behavior in response to a request.
  • 45. 
    Gracie changed her behavior because Alex asked her to stop being rude. This is an example of __________________________.
    • A. 

      Conformity

    • B. 

      Obedience

    • C. 

      Compliance

  • 46. 
    __________________________: the social standard that suggests a favor must be repaid.
  • 47. 
    People are more likely to donate to a charity that sends them a "gift" in addition to an appeal for donations. This is an example of the __________________________.
  • 48. 
    __________________________: a sales method that starts with a modest offer, then improves on it. The improvement seems to require reciprocation, which often takes the form of purchasing the item.
    • A. 

      That's-not-all technique

    • B. 

      Foot-in-the-door technique

    • C. 

      Door-in-the-face technique

    • D. 

      Low-ball technique

  • 49. 
    "A dozen steak knives for $19.99 - and that's not all - this offer includes a free knife sharpener" is an example of the __________________________ technique.
    • A. 

      That's-not-all

    • B. 

      Foot-in-the-door

    • C. 

      Door-in-the-face

    • D. 

      Low-ball

  • 50. 
    __________________________: a sales method that starts with a small request, then makes a larger one.
    • A. 

      That's-not-all technique

    • B. 

      Foot-in-the-door technique

    • C. 

      Door-in-the-face technique

    • D. 

      Low-ball technique

  • 51. 
    "You've already purchased our 3-month membership for $15.99, I recommend purchasing our yearly membership for just $49.99" is an example of the __________________________ technique.
    • A. 

      That's-not-all

    • B. 

      Foot-in-the-door

    • C. 

      Door-in-the-face

    • D. 

      Low-ball

  • 52. 
    __________________________: a sales method that starts with requesting something big (you know you won't get), then following up with a reasonable request.
    • A. 

      That's-not-all technique

    • B. 

      Foot-in-the-door technique

    • C. 

      Door-in-the-face technique

    • D. 

      Low-ball technique

  • 53. 
    "You don't want to buy 200 boxes of cookies? Ok, how about two then?" is an example of the __________________________ technique.
    • A. 

      That's-not-all

    • B. 

      Foot-in-the-door

    • C. 

      Door-in-the-face

    • D. 

      Low-ball

  • 54. 
    __________________________: a sales method that starts with getting a commitment, then raising the price.
    • A. 

      That's-not-all technique

    • B. 

      Foot-in-the-door technique

    • C. 

      Door-in-the-face technique

    • D. 

      Low-ball technique

  • 55. 
    "Your total comes to $91.00 + shipping and handling, it's actually $120.00" is an example of the __________________________ technique.
    • A. 

      That's-not-all

    • B. 

      Foot-in-the-door

    • C. 

      Door-in-the-face

    • D. 

      Low-ball

  • 56. 
    __________________________: changes in a person's behavior due to another person's presence.
  • 57. 
    __________________________: the tendency to perform simple or well-practiced tasks better in the presence of others than alone.
    • A. 

      Social facilitation

    • B. 

      Social inhibition

    • C. 

      Social loafing

  • 58. 
    Chris plays tennis better in the presence of others. This is an example of __________________________.
    • A. 

      Social facilitation

    • B. 

      Social inhibition

    • C. 

      Social loafing

  • 59. 
    __________________________: the tendency to perform complex or difficult tasks more poorly in the presence of others.
    • A. 

      Social facilitation

    • B. 

      Social inhibition

    • C. 

      Social loafing

  • 60. 
    Chris plays piano worse in the presence of others. This is an example of __________________________.
    • A. 

      Social facilitation

    • B. 

      Social inhibition

    • C. 

      Social loafing

  • 61. 
    __________________________: a pattern in which people working together on a task generate less total effort than they would have if they had each worked alone.
  • 62. 
    In a study, individual men were asked to pull on a rope; the average force for these pulls was 139 pounds. When groups of eight pulled together, the average was 546 pounds - only about 68 pounds per person. This is an example of __________________________.
    • A. 

      Social facilitation

    • B. 

      Social inhibition

    • C. 

      Social loafing

  • 63. 
    __________________________: a state in which an individual in a group experiences a weakened sense of personal identity and diminished self-awareness.
  • 64. 
    The Stanford Prison Experiment was an example of a large group of individuals experiencing __________________________. 
  • 65. 
    __________________________: a pattern in group discussions in which each member's attitudes become more extreme, even though the discussion draws attention to arguments that could have moderated their views. 
    • A. 

      Group polarization

    • B. 

      Risky shift

    • C. 

      Group think

  • 66. 
    __________________________: a pattern in which a group appears more willing to take chances or take an extreme stance than any individual members would have been on their own.
    • A. 

      Group polarization

    • B. 

      Risky shift

    • C. 

      Group think

  • 67. 
    __________________________: a pattern of thinking that occurs when a cohesive group minimizes or ignores members' differences of opinion.
    • A. 

      Group polarization

    • B. 

      Risky shift

    • C. 

      Group think

  • 68. 
    __________________________: one reason people fail to help strangers in distress: the larger the group a person is in, the less likely he is to help, partly because no one in the group thinks it is up to him to act.
  • 69. 
    __________________________: a type of misunderstanding that occurs when members of a group don't realize that the other members share their perceptions (often, their uncertainty about how to react to a situation). As a result, each member wrongly interprets the others' inaction as reflecting their better understanding of the situation. 
  • 70. 
    In chemistry class Helen smells, what she believes to be, something burning. Observing that none of her classmates appear to take notice of the smell, Helen comes to the conclusion the smell must not be anything to worry about. This is an example of __________________________.
  • 71. 
    __________________________: when each bystander is persuaded that someone else will respond to the emergency and will take responsibility.
  • 72. 
    36 out of 37 people who witnessed Kitty Genovese's brutal attack and murder did not call the police because they all thought "lots of people can hear her, someone else will call". This is an example of a  __________________________.
  • 73. 
    __________________________: helping behavior that does not benefit the helper.
  • 74. 
    Lauren regularly gives money to the homeless man near her work because she wants him to be able to buy something to eat. This is an example of __________________________.