Nichiren Buddhism Quotes & Phrases - Match The Name

17 Questions | Total Attempts: 114

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Nichiren Buddhism Quizzes & Trivia

A 20 minute quiz for SGI buddhist members to match the quotes & phrases to the names of individuals based on quotes from their works, writings and speeches


Questions and Answers
  • 1. 
    Which gosho is this from:“If you seek enlightenment outside yourself, then your performing even ten thousand practices and ten thousand good deeds will be in vain. It is like the case of a poor man who spends night and day counting his neighbor's wealth but gains not even half a coin.”
    • A. 

      Enlightenment of Plants

    • B. 

      Supremacy of the Law

    • C. 

      A Bald Sage and his Begging Bowl

    • D. 

      On Attaining Buddhahood in this Lifetime

  • 2. 
    "The underlying difference between someone who is clever and someone who is not can be imagined as the difference between the top and the bottom side of a line drawn in pencil. It is really insignificant."
    • A. 

      Tsunesaburo Makiguchi

    • B. 

      Josei Toda

    • C. 

      Daisaku Ikeda

    • D. 

      Jonathan Winters

  • 3. 
    Apprehension and evaluation are not the same. [The famous story of the samurai] becoming terrified seeing a ghost in withered pampas grasses is an example arising from misapprehension. We must avoid making judgments about people or events from emotion or supposition. To evaluate on the basis of rumor or reputation is risky. We must avoid evaluating even the words of a spouse or close friend on the basis of misapprehension.
    • A. 

      Tsunesaburo Makiguchi

    • B. 

      Josei Toda

    • C. 

      Daisaku Ikeda

    • D. 

      Vince Lombardi

  • 4. 
    "You cannot judge the quality of another's friendship by superficial appearances, especially when things are going smoothly. It is only when we have experienced the worst, most crushing of times-when we have plumbed the depths of life-that we can experience the joys of genuine friendship. Only a man of principle, a woman of resolve-a person who stays true to their chosen path-can be a trusted and true friend, and have real friends in turn."
    • A. 

      Josei Toda

    • B. 

      Tsunesaburo Makiguchi

    • C. 

      Daisaku Ikeda

    • D. 

      Pat Riley

  • 5. 
    Who helped publish the book The System of Value-Creating Pedagogy?
    • A. 

      Tsunesaburo Makiguchi

    • B. 

      Josei Toda

    • C. 

      Daisaku Ikeda

  • 6. 
    What is the The Geography of Human Life about?
    • A. 

      The very first Where's Waldo book

    • B. 

      A work originally published in Japan in the early 1900s, offering a social and educational view of the human condition, described in geographic terms.

    • C. 

      Theory of evolution and why we should abandon California when the big one finally hits and creates the Arizona beach coastline

  • 7. 
    Who wrote the book:  The Flower of Chinese Buddhism
    • A. 

      Confucius

    • B. 

      T'ien-t'ai

    • C. 

      Josei Toda

    • D. 

      Daisaku Ikeda

    • E. 

      Tsunesaburo Makiguchi

  • 8. 
    Who wrote the Ho Goku in the Human Revolution
    • A. 

      Tsunesaburo Makiguchi

    • B. 

      Josei Toda

    • C. 

      Shinichi Yamamoto

    • D. 

      Daisaku Ikeda

  • 9. 
    "There are three standards for selecting a job: the three values of beauty, benefit and good. Everyone's ideal is to get a job they like (beauty), that is materially rewarding (benefit), and where you can contribute to society (good). The real world, however, is not as accommodating a place as you may think. Those who find a job that meets their ideal from the outset are doubtless few and far between. More often than not, people have to work at a job they never expected to have to do."Without running away from a disagreeable job, you should continue to work hard while praying to the Gohonzon. By continuing in this way, in the end you will definitely find yourself in a position that you like, that is profitable, and, moreover, that creates great good for society."Not only that, when you later look back on this period of struggle, you will see that none of your hard work was wasted, that your past efforts have all become precious assets. You will then understand that everything you have been through had meaning."
    • A. 

      Tsunesaburo Makiguchi

    • B. 

      Josei Toda

    • C. 

      Daisaku Ikeda

    • D. 

      John Dewey

  • 10. 
    "Let's always strive to practice 'actual faith.' Let's stick to the actual without deviating a single step. 'Theoretical faith' is a purely intellectual pursuit, of a merely philosophical dimension. It is faith in words only. 'Actual faith,' on the other hand, is a living reality in terms of both our inner conviction and all aspects of daily life. In other words, it means giving practical expression to our faith. It means to employ our faith to the fullest, both in our work--whatever our profession, be it a bookseller or a schoolteacher--and in our private lives."
    • A. 

      Tsunesaburo Makiguchi

    • B. 

      Josei Toda

    • C. 

      Daisaku Ikeda

  • 11. 
    "In life, the final victory is the true victory. The victories of youth are not the decisive ones. They are nothing but training for that final, ultimate victory in life."
    • A. 

      Tsunesaburo Makiguchi

    • B. 

      Josei Toda

    • C. 

      Daisaku Ikeda

    • D. 

      Phil Jackson (current coach of NBA's Los Angeles Lakers basketball team)

  • 12. 
    Education is the process of socializing the individual, where "society" is understood as a kind of organism, the encompassing and embracing organization of the human spirit. People are connected as individuals to this group known as society. The individual and group mutually influence each other. Thus, so long as we live in society, individual happiness is unthinkable without a concern for society; in the same way the flourishing of society is unthinkable if the happiness of the individual is disregarded."
    • A. 

      Tsunesaburo Makiguchi

    • B. 

      Josei Toda

    • C. 

      Daisaku Ikeda

    • D. 

      Henry Kissinger

  • 13. 
    "Whether it be individuals, organizations, nations, civilizations, all forms of life in nature--for all entities in this universe, life is an ongoing challenge. In this struggle we find the essence and unchanging truth of life. When one stops challenging, decline begins."
    • A. 

      Tsunesaburo Makiguchi

    • B. 

      Josei Toda

    • C. 

      Daisaku Ikeda

    • D. 

      Charles Darwin

  • 14. 
    "The question of how to live one's life and find one's true life purpose can only be solved by making consistent effort to help others win over the miseries that afflict them. This is the way of the bodhisattva--to exert oneself for the sake of others while striving for one's own self-realization."
    • A. 

      Tsunesaburo Makiguchi

    • B. 

      Josei Toda

    • C. 

      Daisaku Ikeda

    • D. 

      Nagarjuna

  • 15. 
    "To ignore the supremacy of the Lotus Sutra and assert that other sutras stand on a par with it is to commit the worst possible slander of the Law, a major offense of the utmost gravity. No analogy could suffice to illustrate it. The Buddhas, for all their powers of magical transformation, could never finish describing its consequences, and the bodhisattvas, with all the wisdom at their command, could not fathom its immensity. Thus, the “Simile and Parable” chapter of the Lotus Sutra says, “If I were to describe the punishments [that fall on persons who slander this sutra], I could exhaust a kalpa and never come to the end.” This passage means that not even a whole kalpa would be time enough to explain the full gravity of the offense of a person who acts even once against the Lotus Sutra."
    • A. 

      Vasubandhu

    • B. 

      Shakyamuni

    • C. 

      Nichiren Daishonin

    • D. 

      Nichigenyo

    • E. 

      Daisaku Ikeda

  • 16. 
    Life, in all its forms, possesses a fundamental desire to create value. Value is a relative notion, and in this world that is a tapestry of relationships, life is always seeking to create ever better relationships, that is, ever greater value. Life tries to weave a more beautiful tapestry (the value of beauty), a more useful tapestry (the value of benefit), a better tapestry (the value of good). All life, whatever its present form, is seeking to transcend its present state in pursuit of perfection."
    • A. 

      Tsunesaburo Makiguchi

    • B. 

      Josei Toda

    • C. 

      Daisaku Ikeda

    • D. 

      Nichiren Daishonin

  • 17. 
    "Everyone born in this world has a unique role that only he or she can fulfill. Were this not the case, we would not be here. The universe never acts without cause; everything invariably has a reason for being. Even the weeds people love to loathe serve a purpose. I might add that every cherry blossom has its own personality, a purpose and meaning in life that is unique to it-as do the plum, peach and damson."
    • A. 

      Tsunesaburo Makiguchi

    • B. 

      Josei Toda

    • C. 

      Daisaku Ikeda

    • D. 

      Abraham Lincoln

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