Rica Practice Quiz 1 Section A

15 Questions

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Rica Practice Quiz 1 Section A

15 Questions to prepare for the RICA


Questions and Answers
  • 1. 
    At the beginning of the school year, Mrs. Harvey uses the results of an entry-level IRI (Informal Reading Inventory) to determine each child's independent, instructional, and frustration reading level.  She will then group students for Universal Access according to similar reading needs. She should remember that:
    • A. 

      Frustration level refers to books above the child's current grade. Students reading books above their level are frustrated and cannot comprehend the material because it is too difficult.

    • B. 

      Knowledge of independent, instructional, and frustration reading levels is important. However, she needs to select grade-level texts for all learners.

    • C. 

      Instructional level refers to students being able to read 90-95% of the words correctly and answer most comprehension questions accurately.

    • D. 

      Independent level refers to what children can independently read. They should be able to choose books they are interested in and discuss them with their peers. Students should be able to read 90% of the words accurately.

  • 2. 
    A first-grade teacher notices one of her students is struggling with reading.  He is in the lowest-achieving reading group.  The teacher has tried some strategies to improve his reading, but he seems to make no progress.  The next step the teacher should take in working with this student is to:
    • A. 

      Assess his reading and target instruction to meet identified skill needs.

    • B. 

      Request the help of specialists at her school such as the reading specialist, resource specialist, or counselor-to make a joint decision on how to best help the student

    • C. 

      Send more homework for the child to practice reading skills with his parents.

    • D. 

      Read more often with the child to help develop confidence, and provide buddy reading time with more capable students.

  • 3. 
    A fourth-grade student is able to read fluently but is unable to identify the main idea of what he has read.  The teacher notices the difficulties this student is having and individually assesses his comprehension and tries to help him connect his experiences to what he is reading through discussions before, during and after his reading.  Additional activities might help this student to bring meaning to the text during and after reading.  Some suggested activities to help this student could include: 
    • A. 

      Making word banks, using computer reading programs, and performing contextual analysis.

    • B. 

      Reading response logs, adjusting reading rate, and increasing library visits.

    • C. 

      Playing word games, sharing books, and observing teacher modeling of how to connect text to experiences.

    • D. 

      Paraphrasing text, self-questioning summarizing and retelling, and using graphic organizers.

  • 4. 
    A first-grade teacher is using the reading program adopted by her school district.  The program includes decodable texts.  The instructional advantage of using decodable texts with beginning readers is that:
    • A. 

      Decodable texts provide abundant practice with previously taught phonic elements and sight words.

    • B. 

      Decodable texts can provide beginning readers with a controlled vocabulary that will enable them to read more books.

    • C. 

      Books with controlled vocabulary are predictable and can be used as literature in a reading program.

    • D. 

      Decodable texts allow the school to accumulate more books in primary classrooms.

  • 5. 
    Mr. Vasquez is planning phonemic awareness instruction for his kindergarten class.  He gives each student the Yopp-Singer assessment.  He then uses the test data to determine student needs and form groups.  When planning instruction for universal Access, Mr. Vasquez should be primarily concerned with:  
    • A. 

      Creating flexible skill groups and providing differentiated instruction.

    • B. 

      Balancing his phonemic awareness groups in a stimulating learning environment.

    • C. 

      Considering the classroom behavior and special needs of each student.

    • D. 

      Seeking outside intervention for students below grade-level standards.

  • 6. 
    It is the beginning of the school year in Mr. Jones's third-grade class. He is examining the results of a standardized reading test that uses norm-referenced, grade-equivalent scores. One student's score was 5.2.  This student's score indicates that her reading performance on this test:
    • A. 

      Corresponds to what an average fifth grader in the second month of school would achieve.

    • B. 

      Represents a top third-grade stanine score for students in the same school.

    • C. 

      Places her in the 51st percentile of all students who have taken this norm-referenced test.

    • D. 

      Was as good as or better than 51%of students in the same grade nationwide.

  • 7. 
    Mr. Tonning gives each of his sixth-grade students an entry-level reading assessment at the beginning of each school year.  At the end of the school year, he administers a summative assessment.  Each time he ranks his students' performance and determines who is reading at the grade-level benchmark, and who is reading above and below that mark.  Mr. Tonning uses this data in a variety of ways.  Mr. Tonning is least likely to use the results to:
    • A. 

      Plan interventions for students below grade-level.

    • B. 

      Communicate to students, parents and school personnel performance information regarding progress on the standards-based assessment.

    • C. 

      Plan reading groups based on student needs.

    • D. 

      Interpret use of the three cueing systems and concepts about print and use them to report student achievement on the stadards-based report card.

  • 8. 
    In preparation for administering thee fourth-grade California Standards Test, Mrs. S reviews the guidelines for administering the test to students with special needs.  She recognizes that students with Individualized Education Programs (IEPs) may require accommodations during assessment.  Which is the most logical action to ensure appropriate testing protocol have been implemented?
    • A. 

      Make arrangements with the resource teacher to individually assess all IEP students.

    • B. 

      Preteach material systematically to provide Universal Access for students with IEPs.

    • C. 

      Consult the manual for a list of possible accommodations available to students with special needs.

    • D. 

      Provide individual students with the accommodations that have been specified in their IEPs.

  • 9. 
    A first-grade teacher has 20 students with varying abilities in reading.  How should the teacher group the students for reading instruction during Universal Access time?
    • A. 

      The teacher should create small groups that remain constant throughout the school year to enable students to form bonds that further their reading progress.

    • B. 

      Primary classes should have children grouped for reading throughout the day. The teacher can often use the same groups for all instruction.

    • C. 

      Grouping is an effective practice, but the groups should remain flexible. The teacher should regroup students as a result of frequent assessment of their skill needs.

    • D. 

      Research has proven that children do best in whole-group instruction. This type of grouping provides for higher and lower ability children and meets the needs of all learners.

  • 10. 
    Mr. N regularly conducts curriculum based assessments with his second-grade class.  As a result, it is clear to him that Juan, a nonnative speaker, can decode and comprehend at a higher reading level than the majority of the class.  What is the most important factor for Mr. N to consider when planning classroom interventions?
    • A. 

      He should always group Juan with other advanced students during the language arts block so he can fully access the English Language curriculum.

    • B. 

      He should vary the complexity of Juan's assignments so Juan can continually access the challenging English vocabulary.

    • C. 

      He should vary the pacing and complexity of the teaching so Juan is appropriately challenged during small-group and whole-group instruction.

    • D. 

      He should assess Juan for the Gifted and Talented Education program.

  • 11. 
    Ms. Ramirez notices many of her eighth-grade students making spelling errors.  She wants to gain more specific understanding of her students' spelling needs.  In order to understand their spelling strengths and weaknesses and plan remediation in this problem area, Ms. Ramirez is most likely to begin by:
    • A. 

      Giving direct instruction in spelling, complete with the weekly pre-tests and post-tests.

    • B. 

      Administering a comprehensive spelling assessment and analyzing student writing samples

    • C. 

      Assigning extra spelling homework to go along with her comprehensive spelling program.

    • D. 

      Examining spelling in student journals, essays, and reports on a regular basis and taking anecdotal records.

  • 12. 
    Mr. K a primary teacher, is developing his daily schedule as well as his long-range classroom goals.  According to the California Language Arts Framework, what is the minimum amount of time per day to be allocated for language arts instruction?
    • A. 

      2 1/2 hours

    • B. 

      2 hours

    • C. 

      1 1/2 hours

    • D. 

      1 hour

  • 13. 
    In Ms. Winters' fifth-grade classroom, students create academic vocabulary journals and regularly record newly introduced academic vocabulary.  Which of the following should not be included in an academic vocabulary journal?
    • A. 

      Synonyms and antonyms

    • B. 

      Spelling word lists that focus on a particular pattern

    • C. 

      Meaningful example sentences

    • D. 

      Student-friendly definitions

  • 14. 
    A Primary teacher is aware of the Mathew Effect and its potential impact on student growth.  The teacher plans numerous interventions to reduce its negative effects.  Which of the following is least likely to make a difference in addressing the gap in the Mathew Effect?
    • A. 

      Direct instruction in the use of figurative language and morphemic analysis combined with meaningful independent practice.

    • B. 

      Systematic explicit instruction in word analysis.

    • C. 

      Helping students select books at their independent reading levels.

    • D. 

      Providing students with reading material that holds their interest.

  • 15. 
    A second-grade teacher listens to students read orally in a small guided reading group.  She notices one student who is continually struggling with fluency.  What intervention strategies would best provide for the needs of this student?
    • A. 

      The teacher should model reading with expression. In addition, the teacher should provide decodable text for this student and encourage the child to whisper read and reread passages to develop automaticity and appropriate phrasing

    • B. 

      The teacher needs to concentrate on using related workbook pages in prosody and word-recognition skills for this student to become an automatic reader.

    • C. 

      The teacher should increase time for read alouds, which would provide this reader with more exposure to good literature. Doing this would also result in the added benefits of increasing the student's vocabulary and helping develop automaticity.

    • D. 

      The teacher should give time for sustained, silent reading, which increases fluency and reading rate when the student is reading books at the student's reading level.