Rhetoric Vocabulary Quiz: Week 1 - 3

52 Questions

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Rhetoric Quizzes & Trivia

Questions and Answers
  • 1. 
    The repetition of initial consonant sounds in words
  • 2. 
    A reference to a well-known person, place, or situation from history or from art, music, or another works of literature
  • 3. 
    The repetition of the same or similar vowel sounds in stressed syllables that end with different consonant sounds
  • 4. 
    the omission of words, the meaning of which is provided by the overall context of the passage
  • 5. 
    a figure of speech that uses exaggeration for emphasis
  • 6. 
    the use of a word or phrase to mean the exact opposite of its literal or expected meaning
  • 7. 
    a figure of speech in which a comparison is implied but not stated
  • 8. 
    The use of word or phrase that imitates or suggests the sound it describes
  • 9. 
    The use of a series of words, phrases, or sentences that have similar grammatical form
  • 10. 
    an insertion of material that interrupts the typical flow of a sentence
  • 11. 
    a literary device in which animals, objects, forces of nature, or ideas are given human characteristics
  • 12. 
    a play on words
  • 13. 
    a question to which no answer is expected or the answer is obvious, the point is to make the person who was asked the question think about the particular subject
  • 14. 
    the repetition of the same stressed vowel sounds and any succeeding sounds in two or more rhymes
  • 15. 
    an artful variation from typical formation and arrangement of words or sentences                    
  • 16. 
    a figure of speech that uses the word “like” or “as” to compare two unlike things
  • 17. 
    an artful variation from expected modes of expression of thoughts and ideas
  • 18. 
    The words the speaker or writer uses to describe what happened or happens in a particular situation
  • 19. 
    The words the speaker or writer uses to describe the means by which something happened or happens in a particular situation
  • 20. 
    The words the speaker or writer uses to describe the person or persons involved in taking action in a particular situation
  • 21. 
    the placement of words for effect in a spoken or written text
  • 22. 
    How time period, location, audience, and motivating events influence a particular text
  • 23. 
    logical reasoning with one premise left out
  • 24. 
    the appeal of a text to the credibility and character of the speaker, writer, or narrator
  • 25. 
    a piece of writing classified by type
  • 26. 
    the goal a writer or speak hopes to achieve with the text
  • 27. 
    the kind of character developed "in the text," the ways that the writer's words and phrases, as well as his/her selection of examples and ideas, establish the writer's credibility
  • 28. 
    the art of generating material for a text; the first of five traditional canons of rhetoric
  • 29. 
    The appeal of a text based on the logical structure of its argument or its demonstration of credible materials
  • 30. 
    the appeal of at ext to the emotions or interests of the audience
  • 31. 
    The character that a writer or speaker conveys to the audience
  • 32. 
    The goal a writer or speaker hopes to achieve with the text; the words the speaker or writer uses to describe the reason something happened or happens in a particular situation
  • 33. 
    The art of communication; the art of analyzing all the choices involving language that might make in a situation so that the text becomes meaningful, purposeful, and effective; the specific features of texts that cause them to be meaningful, purposeful, and effective to its audience
  • 34. 
    The words the speaker or writer uses to describe where and when something happened or happens in a particular situation
  • 35. 
    credibility that has been situated in who the writers are and who they have been represented; used when we are dealing with writers we know, writers who have been talked about a great deal or popular figures that we encounter in the press
  • 36. 
    The choices that writers or speakers make in language for effect
  • 37. 
    Logical reasoning from inarguable premises
  • 38. 
    The people who listen to a spoken text or read a written text and are capable of responding to it
  • 39. 
    a writer’s argument or assertion
  • 40. 
    seeking help for one’s writing from a reader
  • 41. 
    Direct quotes or examples that support the writer’s claim
  • 42. 
    the process by which writers get something written so that they can develop their ideas and begin moving toward an end; the raw material for what will become the final product
  • 43. 
    The final observation, before delivery, by a writer or speaker to evaluate appropriateness and to locate missteps in the work
  • 44. 
    activities that writers use, during the writing process, to generate material for a text
  • 45. 
    activities that writers use, during the writing process, to locate ideas and information
  • 46. 
    determining appropriateness of information for audience and for purpose
  • 47. 
    The perspective of a piece of writing; first person, second person, third person
  • 48. 
    the goal the writer or speaker hopes to achieve with the text
  • 49. 
    Returning to a draft to rethink, reread, and rework ideas and sentences
  • 50. 
    The writer’s or speaker’s attitude toward the subject matter, how the author says something
  • 51. 
    explanation and analysis of how the data supports the claim
  • 52. 
    1.       the recurrence of sounds, words, phrases, lines, or stanzas in a literary work or speech