Ultimate Psychology Questions: Quiz

51 Questions | Total Attempts: 57

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Ultimate Psychology Questions: Quiz

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Questions and Answers
  • 1. 
        In 1923, this theorist articulated seven "rules" that governed curriculum construction. 1. Identify major educational aims through a study of contemporary social circumstances. 2. Classify the major aims into ideals and activities and reduce them to operational objectives. 3. Prioritize the aims and objectives. 4. Reprioritize the aims and objectives to lend greater importance to those relevant to children's experience than to those relevant to adults but remote from children. 5. Identify those aims and objectives achievable within the constraints of the school setting, relegating those best accomplished outside the school to extra school experiences. 6. Identify materials and methods conducive to the achievement of the selected aims and objectives 7. Order materials and methods consistent with principles of child psychology
    • A. 

      Franklin Bobbitt

    • B. 

      Ralph W. Tyler

    • C. 

      John Dewey

    • D. 

      William H. Kilpatrick

    • E. 

      Werrett Wallace Charters

  • 2. 
     Who is this?
  • 3. 
    For this theorist, activity analysis was considered a "scientific" approach to curriculum construction insofar as it represented a quantification of human activities as a basis for selecting educational objectives.
    • A. 

      Hilda Taba

    • B. 

      William C. Bagley

    • C. 

      William H. Kilpatrick

    • D. 

      W.W. Charters

    • E. 

      Ralph W. Tyler

  • 4. 
    For this theorist, activity analysis essentially involved the specification of the discrete tasks or activities involved in any social activity. For purposes of curriculum construction, the resulting specifications translated into program objectives.
    • A. 

      W.W. Charters

    • B. 

      William C. Bagley

    • C. 

      Hilda Taba

    • D. 

      William H. Kilpatrick

    • E. 

      Franklin Bobbitt

  • 5. 
    His most significant contribution to the field of curriculum development came in the form of his activity-analysis approach to curriculum construction.
  • 6. 
    He believed "that the teacher's place and work in the school is to be interpreted from this same basis. The teacher is not in the school to impose certain ideas or to form certain habits in the child but is there as a member of the community to select the influences which shall affect the child and to assist him in properly responding to these influences.
    • A. 

      William C. Bagley

    • B. 

      William H. Kilpatrick

    • C. 

      Ralph W. Tyler

    • D. 

      Franklin Bobbitt

    • E. 

      John Dewey

  • 7. 
    Who is this?
  • 8. 
    He believed "that schools should help students learn to live and to work cooperatively with others. In-School and Society he wrote, "In a complex society, ability to understand and sympathize with the operations and lot of others is a condition of common purpose which only education can procure."
    • A. 

      Ralph W. Tyler

    • B. 

      John Dewey

    • C. 

      William C. Bagley

    • D. 

      Werrett Wallace Charters

    • E. 

      William Kilpatrick

  • 9. 
    He believed "that the school must represent present life-life as real and vital to the child as that which he carries on in the home, in the neighborhood, or on the playground."
    • A. 

      William Kilpatrick

    • B. 

      Werrett Wallace Charters

    • C. 

      William C. Bagley

    • D. 

      John Dewey

    • E. 

      Ralph W. Tyler

  • 10. 
        ____________believed " that the school is primarily a social institution. Education being a social process, the school is simply that form of community life in which all those agencies are concentrated that will be most effective in bringing the child to share in the inherited resources of the race, and to use his own powers for social ends. "
    • A. 

      Ralph W. Tyler

    • B. 

      William C. Bagley

    • C. 

      John Dewey

    • D. 

      Franklin Bobbitt

    • E. 

      William Kilpatrick

  • 11. 
    According to Ralph W.Tyler “, a curriculum built around fundamental social occupations would provide the bridge that would harmonize individual and social ends—what for him was the central problem to be resolved in any educational theory.”
    • A. 

      True

    • B. 

      False

  • 12. 
    He has credited with this quotation: "Education is a shaping process as much as the manufacture of steel rails."
    • A. 

      John Dewey

    • B. 

      William H. Kilpatrick

    • C. 

      William C. Bagley

    • D. 

      Franklin Bobbitt

    • E. 

      Ralph W. Tyler

  • 13. 
    He believed that each individual should be educated "according to his capabilities." These views led to a highly differentiated curriculum and a largely utilitarian one that disdained academic subjects for any but college preparatory students.
    • A. 

      Ralph W. Tyler

    • B. 

      Franklin Bobbitt

    • C. 

      William C. Bagley

    • D. 

      William H. Kilpatrick

    • E. 

      John Dewey

  • 14. 
    Who is this?
  • 15. 
    For_________________, a leader in the social efficiency movement, a primary goal of curriculum design was the elimination of waste (1912), and it was wasteful to teach people things they would never use.
    • A. 

      William C. Bagley

    • B. 

      William H. Kilpatrick

    • C. 

      John Dewey

    • D. 

      Ralph W. Tyler

    • E. 

      Franklin Bobbitt

  • 16. 
    He is credited with the following quotation "As agencies of social progress, schools should give efficient service.  And efficient service, we are nowadays coming to know, is service directed, not by guess or whim or special self-interest, but by science."
    • A. 

      William C. Bagley

    • B. 

      William H. Kilpatrick

    • C. 

      John Dewey

    • D. 

      Ralph W. Tyler

    • E. 

      Franklin Bobbitt

  • 17. 
    ________________believed that schools should provide experiences specifically related to those activities demanded of citizens by their society. Furthermore, he thought that the goals for schooling could be derived from an objective analysis of those skills necessary for successful living.
    • A. 

      William H. Kilpatrick

    • B. 

      William C. Bagley

    • C. 

      Franklin Bobbitt

    • D. 

      John Dewey

    • E. 

      Ralph W. Tyler

  • 18. 
    He advocated the practice of analyzing the activities involved in discreet academic subjects and using that analysis to establish specific teaching objectives.
    • A. 

      Ralph W. Tyler

    • B. 

      John Dewey

    • C. 

      William C. Bagley

    • D. 

      Franklin Bobbitt

    • E. 

      William H. Kilpatrick

  • 19. 
    William H. Kilpatrick became famous for developing the modern concept of "objective analysis," a forerunner of job and task analysis.
    • A. 

      True

    • B. 

      False

  • 20. 
    He became famous for developing the modern concept of "objective analysis," a forerunner of job and task analysis.
    • A. 

      Franklin Bobbitt

    • B. 

      William C. Bagley

    • C. 

      William H. Kilpatrick

    • D. 

      Ralph W. Tyler

    • E. 

      John Dewey

  • 21. 
    He is credited with the quotation: "The central theory [of the curriculum] is simple.  Human life, however varied, consists of the performance of specific activities.  Education that prepares for life is one that prepares definitely and adequately for these specific activities.  However numerous and diverse they may be for any social class they can be discovered.  This requires only that one go out into the world of affairs and discover the particulars of which their affairs consist."
    • A. 

      John Dewey

    • B. 

      William H. Kilpatrick

    • C. 

      Franklin Bobbitt

    • D. 

      William C. Bagley

    • E. 

      Ralph W. Tyler

  • 22. 
    In his view, projects had four phases: purposing, planning, executing, and judging. The ideal progression was when all four phases were initiated and completed by the pupils and not by the teacher (1925)
    • A. 

      John Dewey

    • B. 

      William C. Bagley

    • C. 

      Ralph W. Tyler

    • D. 

      William H. Kilpatrick

    • E. 

      W.W. Charters

  • 23. 
    Who is this?
  • 24. 
    In his view, only when the pupils exercised "freedom of action" were they able to acquire independence, power of judgment, and the ability to act-the virtues that he believed were indispensable for the maintenance and further development of democracy.
    • A. 

      William H. Kilpatrick

    • B. 

      W.W. Charters

    • C. 

      William C. Bagley

    • D. 

      Ralph W. Tyler

    • E. 

      Franklin Bobbitt

  • 25. 
    In his view, teachers and others involved with schools must have some perspective, some point of view that grows out of the development of a philosophy of one sort or another, which can serve to ground the various choices they must make.
    • A. 

      W.W. Charters

    • B. 

      William H. Kilpatrick

    • C. 

      Ralph W. Tyler

    • D. 

      Franklin Bobbitt

    • E. 

      William C. Bagley