Quiz 1 4376

43 Questions

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Quiz 1 4376

Quiz on the readings for week one


Questions and Answers
  • 1. 
    In Latin curriculum was ...
    • A. 

      Running/chariot tracks

    • B. 

      A racing chariot

    • C. 

      A recipe

    • D. 

      A concise statement or table of the heads of a discourse, the contents of a treatise, the subjects of a series of lectures

  • 2. 
    Praxis is...
    • A. 

      Practical application or exercise of a branch of learning

    • B. 

      Translating an idea into action

    • C. 

      Is the process by which a theory, lesson, or skill is enacted or practiced, embodied and/or realized. It is a practical and applied knowledge to one's actions. It has meaning in political, educational, and spiritual realms.

    • D. 

      All of the above

    • E. 

      None of the above

  • 3. 
      Which of the following is not described by Mark K. Smith as a way of approaching curriculum theory
    • A. 

      Curriculum as a body of knowledge to be transmitted.

    • B. 

      Curriculum as an attempt to achieve certain ends in students - product.

    • C. 

      Curriculum as a tool of social transformation

    • D. 

      Curriculum as process.

    • E. 

      Curriculum as praxis.

  • 4. 
    Curriculum as ___________________is not a physical thing, but rather the interaction of teachers, students and knowledge. In other words, curriculum is what actually happens in the classroom and what people do to prepare and evaluate.
    • A. 

      A body of knowledge to be transmitted

    • B. 

      An attempt to achieve certain ends in students - product

    • C. 

      A process

    • D. 

      Praxis

  • 5. 
    Curriculum as ___________________is driven by general principles and places an emphasis on judgment and meaning making.
    • A. 

      A body of knowledge to be transmitted

    • B. 

      An attempt to achieve certain ends in students - product

    • C. 

      A process

    • D. 

      Praxis

  • 6. 
    Curriculum as ___________________is a particular form of specification about the practice of teaching. It is not a package of materials or a syllabus of ground to be covered. 'It is a way of translating any educational idea into a hypothesis testable in practice. It invites critical testing rather than acceptance'
    • A. 

      A body of knowledge to be transmitted

    • B. 

      An attempt to achieve certain ends in students - product

    • C. 

      A process

    • D. 

      Praxis

  • 7. 
    Aristotle, according to Mark K. Smith, categorized knowledge into three disciplines: the theoretical, the essential and the practical.
    • A. 

      True

    • B. 

      False

  • 8. 
    Where people still equate curriculum with a syllabus they are likely to limit their planning to a consideration of the content or the body of knowledge that they wish to transmit.
    • A. 

      True

    • B. 

      False

  • 9. 
    According to Mark K. Smith, curriculum as product model is heavily dependent on the setting of behavioural objectives. The curriculum, essentially, is a set of documents for implementation.
    • A. 

      True

    • B. 

      False

  • 10. 
      A syllabus according to Mark K. Smith, will generally indicate the relative importance of its topics or the order in which they are to be studied
    • A. 

      True

    • B. 

      False

  • 11. 
    According to Mark K. Smith, an approach to curriculum theory and practice which focuses on syllabus is only really concerned with content.
    • A. 

      True

    • B. 

      False

  • 12. 
    Education that prepares for life is one that prepares definitely and adequately for these specific activities... This requires only that one go out into the world of affairs and discover the particulars of which their affairs consist. These will show the abilities, attitudes, habits, appreciations and forms of knowledge that men need. These will be the objectives of the curriculum...
    • A. 

      Aristotle

    • B. 

      Ralph W. Tyler

    • C. 

      Franklin Bobbitt

    • D. 

      Frederick Winslow Taylor

    • E. 

      Laurence Stenhouse

  • 13. 
    Curriculum is 'All the learning which is planned and guided by the school, whether it is carried on in groups or individually, inside or outside the school. This definition is attributed to
    • A. 

      John Dewey

    • B. 

      John Kerr

    • C. 

      George S. Counts

    • D. 

      Franklin Bobbitt

    • E. 

      Ralph W. Tyler

  • 14. 
    His theory of curriculum was based on: His theory was based on four fundamental questions: 1. What educational purposes should the school seek to attain? 2. What educational experiences can be provided that are likely to attain these purposes? 3. How can these educational experiences be effectively organized? 4. How can we determine whether these purposes are being attained?
    • A. 

      Franklin Bobbitt

    • B. 

      John Kerr

    • C. 

      Ralph W. Tyler

    • D. 

      John Dewey

    • E. 

      Laurence Stenhouse

  • 15. 
    ___________________was a British educational thinker who sought to promote an active role for teachers in educational research and curriculum development. He was a founder member of the Centre for Applied Research in Education (CARE) at the University of East Anglia.
    • A. 

      Ralph W. Tyler

    • B. 

      Franklin Bobbitt

    • C. 

      John Dewey

    • D. 

      Laurence Stenhouse

    • E. 

      George S. Counts

  • 16. 
    Basically what he proposed was greater division of labour with jobs being simplified; an extension of managerial control over all elements of the workplace; and cost accounting based on systematic time-and-motion study
    • A. 

      Franklin Bobbitt

    • B. 

      Ralph W. Tyler

    • C. 

      Lawrence Stenhouse

    • D. 

      Frederick Winslow Taylor

    • E. 

      John Dewey

  • 17. 
    I believe there is a tendency, recurrent enough to suggest that it may be endemic in the approach, for academics in education to use the objectives model as a stick with which to beat teachers.  'What are your objectives?' is more often asked in a tone of challenge than one of interested and helpful inquiry.  The demand for objectives is a demand for justification rather than a description of ends... It is not about curriculum design, but rather an expression of irritation in the problems of accountability in education. 
    • A. 

      Franklin Bobbitt

    • B. 

      Ralph W. Tyler

    • C. 

      John Dewey

    • D. 

      Laurence Stenhouse

    • E. 

      John Kerr

  • 18. 
    Since the real purpose of education is not to have the instructor perform certain activities but to bring about significant changes in the students' pattern of behaviour, it becomes important to recognize that any statements of objectives of the school should be a statement of changes to take place in the students.
  • 19. 
    The central theory [of curriculum] is simple.  Human life, however varied, consists in the performance of specific activities.  Education that prepares for life is one that prepares definitely and adequately for these specific activities.  However numerous and diverse they may be for any social class they can be discovered.  This requires only that one go out into the world of affairs and discover the particulars of which their affairs consist.  These will show the abilities, attitudes, habits, appreciations and forms of knowledge that men need.  These will be the objectives of the curriculum.  They will be numerous, definite and particularized.  The curriculum will then be that series of experiences which children and youth must have by way of obtaining those objectives. 
  • 20. 
    Critical pedagogy goes beyond situating the learning experience within the experience of the learner: it is a process which takes the experiences of both the learner and the teacher and, through dialogue and negotiation, recognizes them both as problematic...  [It] allows, indeed encourages, students and teachers together to confront the real problems of their existence and relationships... When students confront the real problems of their existence they will soon also be faced with their own oppression
  • 21. 
    • A. 

      Ralph W. Tyler

    • B. 

      Franklin Bobbitt

    • C. 

      Laurence Stenhouse

    • D. 

      Shirley Grundy

    • E. 

      John Dewey

  • 22. 
    • A. 

      Franklin Bobbitt

    • B. 

      Ralph W. Tyler

    • C. 

      Laurence Stenhouse

    • D. 

      John Dewey

    • E. 

      George S. Counts

  • 23. 
    • A. 

      Franklin Bobbitt

    • B. 

      Ralph W. Tyler

    • C. 

      Laurence Stenhouse

    • D. 

      John Dewey

    • E. 

      George S. Counts

  • 24. 
    Defined curriculum as The entire range of experiences, both undirected and directed, concerned in unfolding the abilities of the individual; or
      • it is the series of consciously directed training experiences that the schools use for completing and perfecting the unfoldment.
      • Bobbitt's broad conception of the curriculum first cited was based in the perspective of fostering individual development through all experiences and through planned school experiences.
  • 25. 
    ___________________saw the curriculum as being derived primarily from the needs of society.
      The scheme of a curriculum must take account of the adaptation of studies to the needs of existing community life; it must select with the intention of improving the life we live in common so that the future shall be better than the past"
  • 26. 
    ______________stated that the first step in the thorough study of curriculum and. instruction, whether on a global level or on the school or classroom level, is to ask the question, Each curriculum developer answers this question from a certain perspective based primarily on the needs of each of the levels of curriculum:
      • the society,
      • the subject matter,
      • the learner,
      • the skills to be taught, or
      • the curriculum itself.
  • 27. 
    ____________asserted that in the development of the American curriculum in this century there have been four interest groups, each with its own curriculum perspective.
  • 28. 
    This interest group favors certain practices which include the “child-centred” teaching seen in Canadian schools, the “progressivism” seen in the British primary schools and the “developmentally appropriate practice” advocated by early childhood educators in America. It is a form of romantic naturalism that inspires teacher discomfort with any practice that is deemed incompatible with natural developmental processes.
    • A. 

      Humanists

    • B. 

      Developmentalists

    • C. 

      Social Efficiency Educators

    • D. 

      Social Meliorists

  • 29. 
    __________________ are an interest group that advocates an alternative approach to education based on the work of  Abraham Maslow, who developed a famous hierarchy of needs, Carl Rogers, and Rudolf Steiner, the founder of Waldorf education.[1] In this approach to education, the whole person, not just the intellect, is engaged in the growth and development that are the signs of real learning. The emotions, the social being, the mind, and the skills needed for a career direction are all focuses of this approach
    • A. 

      Humanists

    • B. 

      Developmentalist

    • C. 

      Social Efficiency Educators

    • D. 

      Social Meliorists

  • 30. 
    This interest group  believes that education is a tool to reform society and create change of the better. This socialization goal was based on the power of the individual's intelligence, and the ability to improve on intelligence through education. An individual’s future was not predetermined by gender, race, socio-economic status, heredity or any other factors. “The corruption and vice in the cities, the inequalities of race and gender, and the abuse of privilege and power could all be addressed by a curriculum that focused directly on those very issues, thereby raising a new generation equipped to deal effectively with those abuses”
    • A. 

      Humanists

    • B. 

      Developmentalist

    • C. 

      Social Efficiency Educators

    • D. 

      Social Meliorists

  • 31. 
    This interest group was aiming to design a curriculum that would optimize the “social utility” of each individual in a society.  They believed that society could be controlled. Students would be scientifically evaluated (such as IQ tests), and educated towards their predicted role in society. This involved the introduction of vocational and junior high schools to address the curriculum designed around specific life activities that correlate with each student’s societal future. The curriculum would consist of minute parts or tasks that together formed a bigger concept.
    • A. 

      Humanists

    • B. 

      Developmentalist

    • C. 

      Social Efficiency Educators

    • D. 

      Social Meliorists

  • 32. 
    This interest group felt that an interesting, varied, and useful curriculum would be just as effective in building the mental muscles as rote drills. They also believed that the ideal college preparatory curriculum  was also the best preparation for life, and that all students should therefore study the same subjects.
    • A. 

      Humanists

    • B. 

      Developmentalist

    • C. 

      Social Efficiency Educators

    • D. 

      Social Meliorists

  • 33. 
    Philosophy of this interest group was that learning had to be geared to the child rather than to the narrow expectations of the college community. They questioned the idea that such college-preparatory subjects as algebra were really the best preparation for life, feeling that it was more effective to place students in tracks that would match their own needs and abilities.
    • A. 

      Humanists

    • B. 

      Developmentalists

    • C. 

      Social Efficiency Educators

    • D. 

      Social Meliorists

  • 34. 
    This interest group sought to improve the schools along the model of a business producing a quality product. These reformers wanted standards, accountability, and the elimination of waste.
    • A. 

      Humanist

    • B. 

      Developmentalists

    • C. 

      Social Efficiency Educators

    • D. 

      Social Meliorists

  • 35. 
    This interest group argued that the real purpose of education was to create a better and more just society. They feared that education, if left to the laws of nature, could go the way of Social Darwinism and create a widening gulf between an educated elite and the uneducated masses. This, in turn, could lead to the disintegration of democracy and of our American way of life. Schools and curricula would need to be structured to save future generations from the perils of ignorance. Racial equality, social justice, equal opportunity, and coping with civilization were vital subjects that would need to be taught and learned if society were to survive.
    • A. 

      Humanists

    • B. 

      Developmentalists

    • C. 

      Social Efficiency Educators

    • D. 

      Social Meliorists

  • 36. 
    ________________stated that the first step in the thorough study of curriculum and. instruction, whether on a global level or on the school or classroom level, is to ask the question, "What educational purposes should the school seek to attain?"
    • A. 

      Franklin Bobbitt

    • B. 

      John Dewey

    • C. 

      Ralph W. Tyler

    • D. 

      George S. Counts

    • E. 

      Horace Mann

  • 37. 
      ________________defined curriculum as: The entire range of experiences, both undirected and directed, concerned in unfolding the abilities of the individual; or it is the series of consciously directed training experiences that the schools use for completing and perfecting the unfoldment
  • 38. 
    _______________saw the curriculum as being derived primarily from the needs of society. The scheme of a curriculum must take account of the adaptation of studies to the needs of existing community life; it must select with the intention of improving the life we live in common so that the future shall be better than the past."
  • 39. 
    In this curriculum perspective the curriculum is developed to actualize predetermined ends: goals or outcomes and behavioral objectives.
    • A. 

      Cognitive processes

    • B. 

      Academic rationalism

    • C. 

      Social adaptation and social reconstruction

    • D. 

      Curriculum as technology.

    • E. 

      Focuses on the perceived needs and interests of the individual student

  • 40. 
    Creative problem-solving programs, thinking skills programs, or programs based on the actual modes of inquiry of a discipline are the kinds of programs based on this curriculum perspective.
    • A. 

      Cognitive processes

    • B. 

      Academic rationalism

    • C. 

      Social adaptation and social reconstruction

    • D. 

      Curriculum as technology.

  • 41. 
    This curriculum perspective views the curriculum as the means of transmitting the great ideas and the great works created by humankind.
    • A. 

      Cognitive processes

    • B. 

      Academic rationalism

    • C. 

      Social adaptation and social reconstruction

    • D. 

      Curriculum as technology.

  • 42. 
    This curriculum perspective views the school as a vehicle for improving society
    • A. 

      Cognitive processes

    • B. 

      Academic rationalism

    • C. 

      Social adaptation and social reconstruction

    • D. 

      Curriculum as technology.

    • E. 

      Focuses on the perceived needs and interests of the individual student.

  • 43. 
    A.S. Neill's Summerhill is an example of a school and curriculum shaped bu this curriculum perspective.
    • A. 

      Cognitive processes

    • B. 

      Academic rationalism

    • C. 

      Social adaptation and social reconstruction

    • D. 

      Curriculum as technology.

    • E. 

      Focuses on the perceived needs and interests of the individual student