Chapter 10: Emotion And Motivation

20 Questions | Total Attempts: 817

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Chapter 10: Emotion And Motivation

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Questions and Answers
  • 1. 
    Psychologists used the technique of                 and asked participants to approximate the distance between emotional concepts; their responses allowed the mapping of emotions on a two-dimensional scale.
    • A. 

      Multidimensional mapping

    • B. 

      Multidimensional scaling

    • C. 

      Global scaling

    • D. 

      Pinpoint mapping

  • 2. 
    _____________are diffuse states whereas  __________________are specific and consistent brief responses to          significant events
    • A. 

      Emotions, feelings

    • B. 

      Moods, feelings

    • C. 

      Moods, emotions

    • D. 

      Feelings, emotions

  • 3. 
    This theory of emotion asserts that you would not experience emotion without first experiencing a specific physiological state.
    • A. 

      Two-factor

    • B. 

      Cannon-Bard

    • C. 

      Schachter-Singer

    • D. 

      James-Lange

  • 4. 
    One of the major weaknesses of the Schachter-Singer two-factor theory of emotion is that:
    • A. 

      There are specific physiological states that correspond to each emotion

    • B. 

      There are actually four factors involved in the experience of emotion

    • C. 

      Later research identified physiological responses specific to certain emotions

    • D. 

      Later research showed that norepinephrine is not related to arousal

  • 5. 
    In monkeys, temporal lobe syndrome results in all the following symptoms except: 
    • A. 

      Indiscriminate sexuality

    • B. 

      Sham rage

    • C. 

      Increased eating behaviour

    • D. 

      Decreased fear in response to snakes

  • 6. 
    Two pathways information about a fear stimulus travels through the brain before a fear response is activated: the fast route goes directly from the           to the amygdala; the slow pathway makes an extra stop in the            before reaching the amygdala.
    • A. 

      Thalamus; septum

    • B. 

      Hippocampus; cortex

    • C. 

      Cortex; hippocampus

    • D. 

      Thalamus; cortex

  • 7. 
    Colonel Rogers is feeling pleased about his recent promotion, but before he must speak to the family of a dead soldier he thinks of a time in battle when he lost a friend. What strategy of emotion regulation is he employing?
    • A. 

      Cheer down

    • B. 

      Negative transference

    • C. 

      Over-blunting

    • D. 

      Reappraisal

  • 8. 
    The _____________________ muscle pulls up the corners of the lips during a smile. 
    • A. 

      Cheek extensor

    • B. 

      Cheek retractor

    • C. 

      Obicularis major

    • D. 

      Zygomatic major

  • 9. 
    Patients with Capgras syndrome show __________________skin conductance response to seeing unfamiliar faces when compared to seeing familiar faces. 
    • A. 

      Slightly lower

    • B. 

      Significantly higher

    • C. 

      Virtually the same

    • D. 

      Much lower

  • 10. 
    The universality hypothesis: 
    • A. 

      States that emotional expressions have the same meaning in all cultures, except in preliterate ones

    • B. 

      States that emotional expressions have the same meaning for everyone

    • C. 

      Has been largely disproved

    • D. 

      States that feelings are universal across all cultures

  • 11. 
    Researchers have found that ____________produces a higher heart rate than does_____________ . 
    • A. 

      Fear; anger

    • B. 

      Anger; disgust

    • C. 

      Sadness; fear

    • D. 

      Disgust; anger

  • 12. 
    Olds and Milner (1954) were able to get rats to press a lever for          in lieu of access to food. 
    • A. 

      A sexual partner

    • B. 

      A chance to escape

    • C. 

      Limbic system stimulation

    • D. 

      A saccharin solution

  • 13. 
    Changing one’s emotional experience by changing the meaning of the emotion-eliciting stimulus is called: 
    • A. 

      Experience reacquisition

    • B. 

      Reappraisal

    • C. 

      Cognitive transference

    • D. 

      Emotional transformation

  • 14. 
    The feeling of happiness causes: 
    • A. 

      The temperature of the brain to rise dramatically

    • B. 

      The temperature of the brain to fall dramatically

    • C. 

      A slow change in affective state

    • D. 

      The zygotic major muscles to contract

  • 15. 
    People who take drugs that impair neurotransmission in the amygdala do not have superior memory for: 
    • A. 

      Emotionally evocative words

    • B. 

      Events of their recent past

    • C. 

      Their childhood

    • D. 

      Abstract terms

  • 16. 
    On the scale that maps the two dimensions of emotion, miserable and distressed, both dimensions have: 
    • A. 

      Negative valence

    • B. 

      Low arousal

    • C. 

      High arousal

    • D. 

      Positive valence

  • 17. 
    The amygdala becomes active in response to an emotional photograph; the reappraisal of the photograph as a result of additional information activates the: 
    • A. 

      Hypothalamus

    • B. 

      Hippocampus

    • C. 

      Cortex

    • D. 

      Cerebellum

  • 18. 
    Which one of the following needs is at the bottom of Abraham Maslow’s hierarchy ofneeds?
    • A. 

      Physiological

    • B. 

      Safety and security

    • C. 

      Belongingness

    • D. 

      Esteem

  • 19. 
    • A. 

      A liar speaks more slowly than a truthful person does

    • B. 

      A liar takes longer to respond to questions than a truthful person does

    • C. 

      A liar responds in greater detail than a truthful person does

    • D. 

      A liar is more uncertain than a truthful person is

  • 20. 
    Which of the following statements is correct? 
    • A. 

      The James-Lange theory suggests that a stimulus causes an emotional experience and a physiological reaction to occur simultaneously

    • B. 

      The Cannon-Bard theory suggests that a physiological reaction to a stimulus leads to an emotional experience

    • C. 

      The two-factor theory suggests that people have different psychological reactions to all emotional stimuli, which explains why they then go on to respond differently as well

    • D. 

      Our emotions are produced by the complex interaction of limbic and cortical structures