Process Skills

51 Questions | Total Attempts: 32

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Process Management Quizzes & Trivia

You know the rule, use as a study aid, not as a study guide. Creator is not responsible for any misinformation on quiz. Based off of class notes and lecture. . . Good luck


Questions and Answers
  • 1. 
    Visual Attention means:
    • A. 

      Sequenced rapid eye movements; assists to localize visual stim; requires “shut off” of peripheral vision

    • B. 

      Ability to attend to visual information

    • C. 

      Ability to move eyes for conjugate gaze, horizontal/vertical gaze, contralateral horizontal gaze and convergence

  • 2. 
    Visual Scanning
    • A. 

      Sequenced rapid eye movements; assists to localize visual stim; requires “shut off” of peripheral vision

    • B. 

      Required for visual processing Ability to move eyes for conjugate gaze, horizontal/vertical gaze, contralateral horizontal gaze and convergence

    • C. 

      Ability to attend to visual information

  • 3. 
    Saccadic Eye Movements
    • A. 

      Ability to attend to visual information

    • B. 

      Required for visual processing Ability to move eyes for conjugate gaze, horizontal/vertical gaze, contralateral horizontal gaze and convergence

    • C. 

      Sequenced rapid eye movements; assists to localize visual stim; requires “hut off” of peripheral vision

  • 4. 
    True or False. Visual Fields Area that is able to be covered by eyes when held at midline.
    • A. 

      True

    • B. 

      False

  • 5. 
    True or false: Visual Neglect means: Ignore 1-2 objects in the intact visual field on either side of midline. A person may also have neglect for contralateral upper and lower quadrants
    • A. 

      True

    • B. 

      False

  • 6. 
    Apraxia means:
    • A. 

      The inability to eat

    • B. 

      The inability to motor plan, execute purposeful movement, manipulate objects or use objects appropriately

    • C. 

      The inability to sleep eat or walk. Me right now.

  • 7. 
    Types of apraxia: this means Decreased ability to produce designs in 2-3 deminisions by copying, drawing or construction More prevalent with R>L brain damage
    • A. 

      Constructional

    • B. 

      Dressing

    • C. 

      Motor

    • D. 

      ideomotor

    • E. 

      Ideational

  • 8. 
    Name the apraxia: Inability to dress oneself due to dysfunction in body scheme and spatial issues
    • A. 

      Motor

    • B. 

      Dressing

    • C. 

      Ideomotor

    • D. 

      Verbal

    • E. 

      Ideational

  • 9. 
    Inability to perform purposeful motor tasks on command
    • A. 

      Verbal

    • B. 

      Ideomotor

    • C. 

      Motor

    • D. 

      Ideational

    • E. 

      Dressing

  • 10. 
    Name the apraxia: Inability to imitate gestures
    • A. 

      Ideational

    • B. 

      Ideomotor

    • C. 

      Dressing

    • D. 

      Verbal

    • E. 

      Construtional

  • 11. 
    Body scheme/image: Somatognosia means:
    • A. 

      Lack of awareness of body structure Decreased ability to recognize body parts and to discriminate their relationship to each other

    • B. 

      Inability to integrate and/or use perceptual information from the L side

    • C. 

      Patient does not realize the severity of the neglect Shows unconcern or denial of the neglected body parts

    • D. 

      Doubt or hesitation to use fingers Usually the 3 middle fingers of each hand

    • E. 

      Right/Left Discrimination

  • 12. 
    Unilateral Neglect
    • A. 

      Lack of awareness of body structure Decreased ability to recognize body parts and to discriminate their relationship to each other

    • B. 

      Doubt or hesitation to use fingers Usually the 3 middle fingers of each hand 5. Right/Left Discrimination Inability to discriminate right side from left

    • C. 

      Inability to integrate and/or use perceptual information from the L side

    • D. 

      Patient does not realize the severity of the neglect Shows unconcern or denial of the neglected body parts

    • E. 

      Inability to discriminate right side from left

  • 13. 
    Anosognosia
    • A. 

      Lack of awareness of body structure Decreased ability to recognize body parts and to discriminate their relationship to each other

    • B. 

      Inability to integrate and/or use perceptual information from the L side

    • C. 

      Doubt or hesitation to use fingers Usually the 3 middle fingers of each hand

    • D. 

      Inability to discriminate right side from left

    • E. 

      Patient does not realize the severity of the neglect Shows unconcern or denial of the neglected body parts

  • 14. 
    Finger Agnosia
    • A. 

      Lack of awareness of body structure Decreased ability to recognize body parts and to discriminate their relationship to each other

    • B. 

      Doubt or hesitation to use fingers Usually the 3 middle fingers of each hand

    • C. 

      Inability to integrate and/or use perceptual information from the L side

    • D. 

      Patient does not realize the severity of the neglect Shows unconcern or denial of the neglected body parts

    • E. 

      Inability to discriminate right side from left

  • 15. 
    Right/Left Discrimination
    • A. 

      Lack of awareness of body structure Decreased ability to recognize body parts and todiscriminate their relationship to each other

    • B. 

      Inability to discriminate right side from left

    • C. 

      Inability to integrate and/or use perceptual information from the L side

    • D. 

      Patient does not realize the severity of the neglect Shows unconcern or denial of the neglected body parts

    • E. 

      Doubt or hesitation to use fingers Usually the 3 middle fingers of each hand

  • 16. 
    Ability to discriminate one object from a multitude of others Example: find hairbrush in drawer of head-bands Usually will demonstrate decreased attention span due to increased frustration
    • A. 

      Position in Space

    • B. 

      Form Constancy

    • C. 

      Figure Ground

    • D. 

      Spatial Relations

    • E. 

      Depth/Distance Perceptual Deficits

  • 17. 
    Inability to attend to subtle variations in forms
    • A. 

      Form Constancy

    • B. 

      Figure Ground

    • C. 

      Position in Space

    • D. 

      Topographical Disorientation

    • E. 

      Depth/Distance Perceptual Deficits

  • 18. 
    Inability to discriminate spatial positions Example: in/out; up/down; above/below; beside/under/over
    • A. 

      Position in Space

    • B. 

      Figure Ground

    • C. 

      Spatial Relations

    • D. 

      Topographical Disorientation

    • E. 

      Depth/Distance Perceptual Deficits

  • 19. 
    Difficulty in perception of objects and their relationship to the body
    • A. 

      Topographical Disorientation

    • B. 

      Spatial Relations

    • C. 

      Figure Ground

    • D. 

      Depth/Distance Perceptual Deficits

    • E. 

      Form Constancy

  • 20. 
    True or false Depth/Distance Perceptual Deficits is the inability to judge depth and/or architectural barriers
    • A. 

      True

    • B. 

      False

  • 21. 
    True or false: Becoming easily lost in familiar areas is an example of topographical disorientation
    • A. 

      True

    • B. 

      False

  • 22. 
    Matching agnosias. . . 1)Simultanognosia 2)Prosopagnosia 3)Color Agnosia 4)Metamorphopsia A difficulty recognizing colors B increased problems with visual distortion Example: too large/small C.inability to interpret visual information as a whole D.decreased recognition of differences in faces
    • A. 

      1)A 2)B 3)C 4)D

    • B. 

      1)C 2)D 3)A 4)B

    • C. 

      1)B 2)D 3)A 4)C

    • D. 

      1)B 2)A 3)B 4)C

  • 23. 
    Tactile Agnosia (asterognosis)is the opposite of sterognosis
    • A. 

      True

    • B. 

      False

  • 24. 
    3. Auditory Agnosia Difficulty recognizing different sounds
    • A. 

      True

    • B. 

      False

  • 25. 
    4. Apractognosia is difficulty in maintaining a visual perspective May include all but one of the following:
    • A. 

      Body scheme problems: -Denial of L hemiplegia, Lack of awareness of L half of body or space, Feelings of strangeness. -R/L disorientation for personal and extra personal space

    • B. 

      -Unilateral spatial agnosia -Loss of topographical relationships that means patient is unable to determine the location of bathroom -Distubances in orientation – disoriented to place

    • C. 

      -Dressing Apraxia -Faulty application of clothing due to difficulty understanding relations ship of clothing to body Decreased R/L manipulations used for tying shoe/tie

    • D. 

      _Verbal apraxia

    • E. 

      -Constructional apraxia due to lack of perspective

  • 26. 
    True or false Attention Span Requires several components 1)Alertness 2)Sustained attention 3)Shifting attention 4)Mental tracking
    • A. 

      True

    • B. 

      False

  • 27. 
    Attention Span involves the simultaneous engagement of alertness, selectivity, sustained effort, flexibility and mental tracking
    • A. 

      True

    • B. 

      False

  • 28. 
    Attention Span requires that the individual m be relaxed
    • A. 

      True

    • B. 

      False

  • 29. 
    In order to have good attention span one must be able to maintain focus as long as necessary
    • A. 

      True

    • B. 

      False

  • 30. 
    In order to have good attention span one must be able to ignore information that is not relevant to the task at hand
    • A. 

      True

    • B. 

      False

  • 31. 
    In order to have good attention span one must be able to track multiple sequences of information individually
    • A. 

      True

    • B. 

      False

  • 32. 
    Assessment of the Components of Attention: basic& complex: "To detect and react to a gross change in the environment (eg. telephone ringing or name being called)" is an example of:
    • A. 

      Basic detection reaction skills

    • B. 

      Complex detection reaction skills

  • 33. 
    Assessment of the Components of Attention: basic& complex: Attending to a target and inhibiting competing distraction (eg. Attending to a work task while ignoring music playing or people talking is an example of
    • A. 

      Complex selection

    • B. 

      Basic selection

  • 34. 
    Assessment of the Components of Attention: basic& complex: To persist and keep track of information (eg. empty dishwasher top and bottom shelves, stuff envelopes and keep track of the number completed
    • A. 

      Basic sustained

    • B. 

      Complex sustained

  • 35. 
    Assessment of the Components of Attention: basic& complex: Shift back and forth between two tasks-sequences (eg. Stop and answer telephone while filing and typing
    • A. 

      Complex shifting attention

    • B. 

      Basic shifting attention

  • 36. 
    Assessment of the Components of Attention: basic& complex: Keep track of two or more stimuli simultaneously (eg. Cooking while listening to the radio
    • A. 

      Complex mental tracking

    • B. 

      Basic mental tracking

  • 37. 
    An example of complex detection reaction would be:
    • A. 

      To detect with increasing amounts of stimuli with emphasis on speed (eg. Find the spelling errors on the page as quickly as possible

    • B. 

      Maintain visual fixation on a brightly colored pencil eraser while ignoring another pencil moved in the visual field

    • C. 

      To follow one change in activity (eg. Add numbers then subtract numbers

    • D. 

      To persist with a repetitive activity, such as bouncing a ball over time

    • E. 

      Immediate recall (eg. Remembering a phone number just given on the telephone)

  • 38. 
    An example of basic selection would be
    • A. 

      Maintain visual fixation on a brightly colored pencil eraser while ignoring another pencil moved in the visual field

    • B. 

      To persist with a repetitive activity, such as bouncing a ball over time

    • C. 

      To follow one change in activity (eg. Add numbers then subtract numbers

    • D. 

      Immediate recall (eg. Remembering a phone number just given on the telephone)

  • 39. 
    An example of basic sustain would be:
    • A. 

      Immediate recall (eg. Remembering a phone number just given on the telephone)

    • B. 

      To persist with a repetitive activity, such as bouncing a ball over time

    • C. 

      Maintain visual fixation on a brightly colored pencil eraser while ignoring another pencil moved in the visual field

    • D. 

      To follow one change in activity (eg. Add numbers then subtract numbers

  • 40. 
    An example of basic shifting would be:
    • A. 

      To persist with a repetitive activity, such as bouncing a ball over time

    • B. 

      Immediate recall (eg. Remembering a phone number just given on the telephone)

    • C. 

      To follow one change in activity (eg. Add numbers then subtract numbers

    • D. 

      Maintain visual fixation on a brightly colored pencil eraser while ignoring another pencil moved in the visual field

  • 41. 
    An example of basic mental tracking:
    • A. 

      Immediate recall (eg. Remembering a phone number just given on the telephone)

    • B. 

      Maintain visual fixation on a brightly colored pencil eraser while ignoring another pencil moved in the visual field

    • C. 

      To persist with a repetitive activity, such as bouncing a ball over time

    • D. 

      To follow one change in activity (eg. Add numbers then subtract numbers

  • 42. 
    The ability to order information temporally or spatially
    • A. 

      Sequencing

    • B. 

      Categorization

    • C. 

      Problem-Solving

  • 43. 
    The identification of similarities and differences of information
    • A. 

      Sequencing

    • B. 

      Problem solving

    • C. 

      Catagorization

  • 44. 
    The following of one thing after another in a logical and orderly fashion -Involves planning, organizing, and completing the steps of a task in correct order -Involves temporal concepts such as first, second, and third -Spatial sequencing requires the person to place things in front of, behind etc. -Sequencing activities into the steps of a functional activity
    • A. 

      Sequencing

    • B. 

      Catagorization

  • 45. 
    -The process of systematically placing things in their proper categories -Categories are groupings that are defined by their attributes or the rules that can connect them in some way
    • A. 

      Sequencing

    • B. 

      Catagorization

  • 46. 
    True or false: Functional categorization is the process by which the person sees groupings among experiences Eg. Squares and triangles have straight lines The above forms a concept (a concept is thought as more complex categories)
    • A. 

      True

    • B. 

      False

  • 47. 
    Types of abstractions formed when using language (comparison of two writing styles of authors)
    • A. 

      Verbal/semantic

    • B. 

      Visual/perceptual

  • 48. 
    Involve physical traits that are seen or felt (learn “the feel” of driving different cars or distinguish between a photograph and painting
    • A. 

      Verbal/perceptual

    • B. 

      Verbal semantic

  • 49. 
    Categories are basic, tangible, concrete and easy to learn Rooted in common experiences E.G. dog or cat
    • A. 

      Basic concepts

    • B. 

      Fuzzy concepts

  • 50. 
    Ideas with uncertain boundaries Persons concept of art or music
    • A. 

      Basic concepts

    • B. 

      Fuzzy concepts

  • 51. 
    True or False: Deficits associated with frontal lobe damage, Cognitive-related deficits to the frontal lobe might involve sensory, attention, memory, motivation, and emotion have an impact on problem solving
    • A. 

      True

    • B. 

      False