Cwe Practice Exam

12 Questions | Total Attempts: 359

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Cwe Practice Exam

Quizzes are optional, but a great way to reinforce what you are learning and prepare for our final certification exam.


Questions and Answers
  • 1. 
    Objections ?
    • A. 

      Should be addressed lightly in the content section of a webinar and addressed seriously in the close.

    • B. 

      Rely on a preponderance of evidence to deflate them. However, they’re really quite easy to destroy when you hit all the universal objections toward the end of the close, one after another.

    • C. 

      Are handled with bonuses. By fusing each objection to a bonus, the audience associates an item that seems free with an objection, weakening the objection before you destroy it.

    • D. 

      Are so insidious you can’t wait to address them. You have to weaken them in the introduction. You bring in the demolition crew later.

  • 2. 
    Testimonials are
    • A. 

      Vitally important. Use them, or another proof element, throughout your presentation, especially in the introduction. Five testimonials in the first five minutes is a good rule of thumb.

    • B. 

      A core part of the close and require their own section. The testimonials section should have at least ten testimonials, though the presenter should cover each quickly.

    • C. 

      Essentially bragging, so you have to tone them down a little. If you come at the audience with a flurry of aggressive testimonials, you will be perceived as bragging too much, and much of your audience will become distracted with that.

    • D. 

      Essential. However, a common mistake among webinars is the overuse of testimonials. You should sprinkle them in at various points of a webinar, but use them judiciously to maximize effectiveness. Five testimonials during a webinar is a good rule of thumb.

  • 3. 
    People are unlikely to say yes the first time they are presented with a major investment and opportunity for change. About how many times should you expect them to say no?
    • A. 

      One. Aim for the lowest number by destroying objections before asking for the sale.

    • B. 

      Three. Few people are ready to jump into the offer, even after one no. You have to attack a significant amount of objections after a couple noes.

    • C. 

      Five. It’s not just objections that you have to follow up the initial noes with. You have to present your bonuses as well to punch up the offer. After about five noes, however, most people are pretty locked into their position.

    • D. 

      Twenty-six. The initial noes don’t even matter much. At first you withhold information, and with each additional piece of information about what they’re getting you can turn more noes to yeses.

  • 4. 
    A confident presenter will
    • A. 

      Hold back the best bonus for last, similar to how a comedian or movie builds up to the payoff.

    • B. 

      Lead off the bonus offers with the best material in order to hook the audience right away.

    • C. 

      Bundle bonus offers into one irresistible bonus that should knock down a huge portion of objections and excite a huge portion of the audience.

    • D. 

      Make the core offer and bonuses about equal in attractiveness, steadily drawing in more and more of the audience before really kicking it into high gear with robust guarantees and convincing penalties for waiting to sign up.

  • 5. 
    A webinar can easily run to an hour and a half;
    • A. 

      As such, you really have to rethink the structure of a traditional webinar by presenting the offer at the beginning. This structure creates surprise and creates the opportunity for many efficiencies later in the webinar.

    • B. 

      Therefore, you need to be efficient at all times and carefully avoid being repetitive.

    • C. 

      Therefore, you need to deploy repetition in order to help remind your audience of key features of the presentation, including an entire minute of review in the middle.

    • D. 

      Therefore, you want to limit sections where you address objections, bonus offers, scarcity, and commitment to one part of the webinar.

  • 6. 
    ____________ is everything for the sale.
    • A. 

      The offer

    • B. 

      The content portion of a webinar

    • C. 

      Authority

    • D. 

      Offering an unconditional guarantee

    • E. 

      All of the above.

  • 7. 
    We warn not to be annoying with your calls for commitment. He also says you should shoot for about how many small commitments during the course of a webinar?
    • A. 

      Several micro-commitments leading to the macro-commitment.

    • B. 

      The typical number in most webinars is about 5 to 8. We also suggest you should double this amount.

    • C. 

      Prior to the big commitment that matters, many small commitments are necessary. Therefore, you want to shoot for something in the range of 25 to 30.

    • D. 

      Over 150 small commitments.

  • 8. 
    A sales webinar is, at least partly, about providing a solution to a “problem” your audience has. A superior presentation
    • A. 

      Provides several distinct methods for audience members to solve their problems because you need various options to fit various needs.

    • B. 

      Is modest with a solution. Less is more, to the point that the actual solution is of lesser importance to the pitch; the emotional state that you put the audience in is what matters most.

    • C. 

      Provides one clear, easy path to achieve a solution that the audience feels good about the first time they hear it.

    • D. 

      Initially provides two to five times more content than you could possibly deliver. When performed correctly, this content will “wow” the audience before you proceed to pare it down to something simpler that will not merely impress but will deliver sales.

    • E. 

      Both A & D are correct.

  • 9. 
    Which of the following is accurate for webinar sales?
    • A. 

      More purchases are made emotionally than they ever will be logically.

    • B. 

      Any emotion is preferable to none.

    • C. 

      Believe it or not anger is one of the best things to use to sell.

    • D. 

      When in doubt, build a result around the desire for instant gratification.

    • E. 

      If you can show customers how what you teach them is the remedy for disconnection and discontent, you can sell practically anything to them.

    • F. 

      All of the above.

  • 10. 
    Waiting is the silent objection, and you use ________ to handle that objection.
    • A. 

      Hope and intrigue

    • B. 

      Scarcity

    • C. 

      Guarantees

    • D. 

      Vision

    • E. 

      Strategy

    • F. 

      Commitment

  • 11. 
    While going through the important step by step process of your solution,
    • A. 

      It is important to be highly efficient in order to move quickly and transition into the close while the audience is excited about the process you’ve presented and it’s still fresh in their minds.

    • B. 

      Take the time to set the stage for why each step is important and what’s involved. Think of it as laying the ground rules to put the proper technique into the proper perspective.

    • C. 

      Respect the intelligence of your audience and go straight into the “how to” section of your process. The vision you’ve been consistently incorporating into the presentation creates the proper perspective for each step.

    • D. 

      Be very selective about what you include. Most webinars belabor the point about how to go through each step of their proposed process, trying to convince the audience of why each step is crucial. This design is tedious and fails to move customers.

  • 12. 
    People often feel stuck or blocked in moving forward with a new venture or feel that a problem is too hard to solve, so it’s valuable to provide a model of the future or provide a new identity to shoot for, one that is absent the problem. This is called
    • A. 

      Vision.

    • B. 

      Pacing the future.

    • C. 

      Solution provision.

    • D. 

      Identity formation.

    • E. 

      Past/present/future relatability.

    • F. 

      Familiarity within novelty.

    • G. 

      Both C & D are correct.