Essential Poetry Terms To Know! Trivia Questions Quiz

39 Questions | Total Attempts: 86

SettingsSettingsSettings
Please wait...
Essential Poetry Terms To Know! Trivia Questions Quiz

.


Questions and Answers
  • 1. 
    What type of poem is unrhymed and has no structure?
    • A. 

      Elegy

    • B. 

      Free Verse

    • C. 

      Analogy

    • D. 

      Ballad

  • 2. 
    What does the term 'denotation' mean?
    • A. 

      The meaning of a verb

    • B. 

      The feeling a word gives you when you hear it

    • C. 

      The literal or dictionary meaning of a word

    • D. 

      The way an adverb attaches itself to the meaning of the verb

  • 3. 
    The following is an example of which type of figurative language? "Peter Piper picked a peck of pickled peppers"
    • A. 

      Consonance

    • B. 

      Alliteration

    • C. 

      Asssonance

    • D. 

      Metaphor

  • 4. 
    An allusion is....
    • A. 

      One piece of poetry (or other literary work) makes reference to another piece of literature, character, or famous situation within the poem...

    • B. 

      A poem in which the characters or descriptions convey a hidden symbolic or moral message.

    • C. 

      Something which can't be seen

    • D. 

      The concluding section of a poem

  • 5. 
    Imagery is.......
    • A. 

      Pictures created by artists

    • B. 

      Pictures created in a reader's mind by authors purely by the author's words

    • C. 

      Flowers, and birds, and stuff like that

    • D. 

      Hope

  • 6. 
    "I was so hungry that I ate the entire house".....is an example of which type of figurative language?
    • A. 

      Metaphor

    • B. 

      Simile

    • C. 

      Consonance

    • D. 

      Hyperbole

  • 7. 
    The author of the new novel stated, "We're not in Kansas anymore"....as he pointed out that his character was like Dorothy in "The Wizard of Oz"......this would be an example of which literary term?
    • A. 

      Analogy

    • B. 

      Imagery

    • C. 

      Siutational irony

    • D. 

      Allusion

  • 8. 
    The following words:   meow, buzz, boom are all clear examples of which literary term?
    • A. 

      Rhyme

    • B. 

      Assonance

    • C. 

      Onomatopoeia

    • D. 

      Internal rhyme

  • 9. 
    What is the rhyme scheme of the following poem (from "Life" by Emily Dickinson) Glee! The great storm is over! Four have recovered the land; Forty gone down together Into the boiling sand.
    • A. 

      Abcc

    • B. 

      Abcb

    • C. 

      Abaa

    • D. 

      Abbc

  • 10. 
    What is a paradox?
    • A. 

      A true statement that seems to contradict itself

    • B. 

      Something that is different from what it seems

    • C. 

      Language that appeals to the senses

    • D. 

      Repetition of accented vowels

  • 11. 
    "He was a snake in the grass" is an example of....
    • A. 

      Simile

    • B. 

      Metaphor

    • C. 

      Hyperbole

    • D. 

      Allusion

  • 12. 
    "Her eyes shown like diamonds".....example of...
    • A. 

      Metaphor

    • B. 

      Simile

    • C. 

      Hyperbole

    • D. 

      Allusion

  • 13. 
    What is a strong definition of the term STYLE in regard to poetry and literature?  What are some examples of it?
    • A. 

      The tone and mood of a piece of writing can cause the style to be negative or positive.

    • B. 

      The way someone dresses and thinks/feels --fancy and plain are examples

    • C. 

      The tone and style are basically intertwined in a piece of writing, POSITIVE and NEGATIVE are types one can expect

    • D. 

      Describes the ways that the author uses words — the author's word choice, sentence structure, figurative language, and sentence arrangement all work together to establish mood, images, and meaning in the text. Some examples are: SIMPLE, COMPLEX, etc

  • 14. 
    A poem that tells a story is called a.....
    • A. 

      Quatrain

    • B. 

      Limerick

    • C. 

      Narrative poem

    • D. 

      Free verse

  • 15. 
    In the line, "We fight with all our might,"  the underlined words are an example of.....
    • A. 

      Approximate rhyme

    • B. 

      Internal rhyme

    • C. 

      Rhyme

    • D. 

      Consonance

  • 16. 
    Connotation means....
    • A. 

      The dictionary meaning of a word

    • B. 

      The feeling you get from a word

    • C. 

      The ending of a word

    • D. 

      The word itself

  • 17. 
    The repetition of consonant sounds at the beginning of words within the same line of a poem.
    • A. 

      Metaphor

    • B. 

      Allusion

    • C. 

      Alliteration

    • D. 

      Rhyme

  • 18. 
    The repetition of vowel sounds witin the same line of a poem.
    • A. 

      Assonance

    • B. 

      Extended Metaphor

    • C. 

      Imagery

    • D. 

      Meter

  • 19. 
    What is a strong definition for the literary term MOOD?
    • A. 

      The tone of the poem

    • B. 

      The atmosphere or feelings the author creates for the reader

    • C. 

      Hopeful or sad, etc.

    • D. 

      Giving the central idea or theme of a poem

  • 20. 
    A group of lines in a poem (like a paragraph in prose) that contain the same thematic idea, meter, or rhyme pattern.
    • A. 

      Verbal Irony

    • B. 

      Symbol

    • C. 

      Stanza

    • D. 

      Blank Verse

  • 21. 
    What is a couplet?
    • A. 

      Two lines in a poem that have the same rhythm

    • B. 

      Two poems that are very similar in regards to style and theme

    • C. 

      Two lines in a poem that rhyme and make a unit

    • D. 

      Two lines in a poem that form a meter

  • 22. 
    What does the term SYMBOL mean in literature?
    • A. 

      When you give a sign

    • B. 

      Symbolism

    • C. 

      A person, place, object, or action that stands for something BEYOND itself.

    • D. 

      A response that gives reason for the theme of a poem

  • 23. 
    What does SPEAKER of a poem mean?
    • A. 

      The person reading the poem

    • B. 

      The author

    • C. 

      The person giving a speech about a poem and its theme

    • D. 

      The voice - or narrator - that talks to the reader in a poem (does not have to be the author)

  • 24. 
    City Autumn By Joseph Moncure March The air breathes frost. A thin wind beats Old dust and papers down gray streets And blows brown leaves with curled‐up edges At frightened sparrows on window ledges. A snowflake falls like an errant feather: A vagabond draws his cloak together, And an old man totters past with a cane Wondering if he’ll see spring again. In the above poem, we - as a class - discussed that the poem was written in ______________. 
    • A. 

      Stanzas

    • B. 

      Couplets

    • C. 

      Figurative language

    • D. 

      Meters

  • 25. 
    A person or object that represents (or stands for) another object and/or idea.
    • A. 

      Imagery

    • B. 

      Symbol

    • C. 

      Internal Rhyme

    • D. 

      Couplet

  • 26. 
    Driftwood   by Paul McCormick I found it washed up on the shore, Bleached and stained by sea and sun. I wondered where it had grown before, And how its life had come undone. The ebb and flow have worn it smooth And graceful like a swan's curved neck.  This ancient branch tossed to the dunes, Cast here like some strange shipwreck. In the above poem ---what two things are being compared in stanza 2?
    • A. 

      A dune and a branch

    • B. 

      A swan and a branch

    • C. 

      A dune and a swan

    • D. 

      A shore and a shipwreck

  • 27. 
    Driftwood   by Paul McCormick I found it washed up on the shore, Bleached and stained by sea and sun. I wondered where it had grown before, And how its life had come undone. The ebb and flow have worn it smooth And graceful like a swan's curved neck.  This ancient branch tossed to the dunes, Cast here like some strange shipwreck. In the above poem ---what is the RHYME SCHEME?
    • A. 

      Abab abab

    • B. 

      Abab cdef

    • C. 

      Abab cdcd

    • D. 

      Abcd efgh

  • 28. 
    Driftwood I found it washed up on the shore, Bleached and stained by sea and sun. I wondered where it had grown before, And how its life had come undone The ebb and flow have worn it smooth And graceful like a swan's curved neck. This ancient branch tossed to the dunes, Cast here like some strange shipwreck. In "Driftwood" which word BEST describes the tone of the poem?    (I have put synonyms beside each word choice ---if you do not know these words, please take a minute and write them down/try to remember what they mean as on the EOG ---they will NOT give you the definition/synonyms of the words in the word choices!!!)
    • A. 

      Solemn (serious) and despondent (sad) --

    • B. 

      Lethargic (sluggish and uncaring)

    • C. 

      Reflective (thinking about something deeply)

    • D. 

      Humorous

  • 29. 
    Driftwood I found it washed up on the shore, Bleached and stained by sea and sun. I wondered where it had grown before, And how its life had come undone The ebb and flow have worn it smooth And graceful like a swan's curved neck. This ancient branch tossed to the dunes, Cast here like some strange sthipwreck. In the above poem, SMOOTH and DUNES are an example of:
    • A. 

      Internal rhyme

    • B. 

      Approximate (or slant) rhyme

    • C. 

      Rhyme scheme

    • D. 

      Hyperbole

  • 30. 
    Wishing by Ella Wheeler Wilcox Do you wish the world were better? Let me tell you what to do. Set a watch upon your actions, Keep them always straight and true. Rid your mind of selfish motives, Let your thoughts be clean and high. You can make a little Eden Of the sphere you occupy. Do you wish the world were wiser? Well, suppose you make a start By accumulating wisdom  In the scrapbook of your heart. Do not waste one page on folly; Live to learn, and learn to live. If you want to give men knowledge You must get it ere you give. Do you wish the world were happy? Then remember day by day Just to scatter seeds of kindness as you pass along the way: For the pleasures of many May be oft times traced to one, As the hand that plants an acorn Shelters armies from the sun. According to the author, how can someone make the world a better place?
    • A. 

      Plant more trees

    • B. 

      Be kind to others

    • C. 

      Join the army

    • D. 

      Becoming smarter

  • 31. 
    Wishing by Ella Wheeler Wilcox Do you wish the world were better? Let me tell you what to do. Set a watch upon your actions, Keep them always straight and true. Rid your mind of selfish motives, Let your thoughts be clean and high. You can make a little Eden Of the sphere you occupy. Do you wish the world were wiser? Well, suppose you make a start By accumulating wisdom  In the scrapbook of your heart. Do not waste one page on folly; Live to learn, and learn to live. If you want to give men knowledge You must get it ere you give. Do you wish the world were happy? Then remember day by day Just to scatter seeds of kindness as you pass along the way: For the pleasures of many May be oft times traced to one, As the hand that plants an acorn Shelters armies from the sun. Which of the following is the BEST summary of STANZA 2?
    • A. 

      The world is a hopeless place and someone can never fix it!

    • B. 

      If you want to teach someone something, you must learn it first!

    • C. 

      Create a scrapbook so that others will be able to see what your life was like

    • D. 

      Knowledge is not important at all in an effort to make the world a better place

  • 32. 
    Wishing by Ella Wheeler Wilcox Do you wish the world were better? Let me tell you what to do. Set a watch upon your actions, Keep them always straight and true. Rid your mind of selfish motives, Let your thoughts be clean and high. You can make a little Eden Of the sphere, you occupy. Do you wish the world was wiser? Well, suppose you make a start By accumulating wisdom  In the scrapbook of your heart. Do not waste one page on folly; Live to learn, and learn to live. If you want to give men knowledge You must get it ere you give. Do you wish the world were happy? Then remember day by day Just to scatter seeds of kindness as you pass along the way: For the pleasures of many Maybe ofttimes traced to one, As the hand that plants an acorn Shelters armies from the sun. What does the author mean by, "For the pleasures of the many/ Maybe ofttimes traced to one"? (stanza 3)
    • A. 

      Many people are not happy and others need to just forget it and move forward.

    • B. 

      One person can bring happiness to others

    • C. 

      There are lots of trees that shelter many people and the tree was planted by only one person!

    • D. 

      As long as one person is happy, the world is a better place

  • 33. 
    Wishing by Ella Wheeler Wilcox Do you wish the world were better? Let me tell you what to do. Set a watch upon your actions, Keep them always straight and true. Rid your mind of selfish motives, Let your thoughts be clean and high. You can make a little Eden Of the sphere you occupy. Do you wish the world were wiser? Well, suppose you make a start By accumulating wisdom  In the scrapbook of your heart. Do not waste one page on folly; Live to learn, and learn to live. If you want to give men knowledge You must get it ere you give. Do you wish the world were happy? Then remember day by day Just to scatter seeds of kindness as you pass along the way: For the pleasures of many May be oft times traced to one, As the hand that plants an acorn Shelters armies from the sun. What does the author mean by "Set a watch upon your actions"?  
    • A. 

      Set your clock so you know what is going on and when you need to take action

    • B. 

      Watch how others act because then you know better how to respond in kind

    • C. 

      Treat others as they treat you --if they're kind to you, be kind to them!

    • D. 

      Always act in the correct way and treat others well/with respect/WATCH your actions carefully

  • 34. 
    Wishing by Ella Wheeler Wilcox Do you wish the world were better? Let me tell you what to do. Set a watch upon your actions, Keep them always straight and true. Rid your mind of selfish motives, Let your thoughts be clean and high. You can make a little Eden Of the sphere you occupy. Do you wish the world were wiser? Well, suppose you make a start By accumulating wisdom  In the scrapbook of your heart. Do not waste one page on folly; Live to learn, and learn to live. If you want to give men knowledge You must get it ere you give. Do you wish the world were happy? Then remember day by day Just to scatter seeds of kindness as you pass along the way: For the pleasures of many May be oft times traced to one, As the hand that plants an acorn Shelters armies from the sun. What is the THEME of this poem?  
    • A. 

      Hope for the future and make everyone happy

    • B. 

      Kindness and treating others well can make the world a better place

    • C. 

      Don't give up on life

    • D. 

      Planting trees will make the world a better place

  • 35. 
    Open your Textbook to page 612 to "Simile:  Willow and Gingko"  Use this poem to answer the next few questions.  Remember to choose the BEST answer from the answer choices!!!Question:   Lines 1-4 of this poem reveal that the…...
    • A. 

      Speaker is an artist

    • B. 

      Plants look very different

    • C. 

      Speaker dislikes both plants

    • D. 

      Plants grow very close together

  • 36. 
    The descriptions in lines 5–8 of “Simile: Willow and Ginkgo” help you visualize the trees by appealing to 
    • A. 

      Sight

    • B. 

      Sound

    • C. 

      Touch

    • D. 

      Smell

  • 37. 
    The poet most likely includes a stanza break after line 12 in “Simile: Willow and Ginkgo” because the
    • A. 

      Willis becoming less beautiful

    • B. 

      Fifth stanza discusses only the ginkgo

    • C. 

      Fourth stanza is only one long sentence

    • D. 

      Fourth stanza discusses only the willow

  • 38. 
    If you visualize the ginkgo as it is described in lines 17–20 of “Simile: Willow and Ginkgo,” it is
    • A. 

      Beautiful

    • B. 

      A hardy weed

    • C. 

      Metallic like the city

    • D. 

      Protected and precious

  • 39. 
    Lines 21–22 of “Simile: Willow and Ginkgo” are most likely their own stanza because the poet wants to emphasize the
    • A. 

      Plants' different yet powerful effects

    • B. 

      Way the plants look to other people

    • C. 

      Way the plants look in the speaker's mind

    • D. 

      Plants' effects on their surroundings