Poetry Multiple Choice (Exam Practice)

10 Questions | Total Attempts: 536

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Multiple Choice Quizzes & Trivia

Practice poetry multiple choice


Questions and Answers
  • 1. 
    Thou ill-form’d offspring of my feeble brain, Who after birth did’st by my side remain, Till snatcht from thence by friends, less wise than true, Who thee abroad exposed to public view, Made thee in rags, halting to th’ press to trudge, Where errors were not lessened (all may judge). At thy return my blushing was not small, My rambling brat (in print) should mother call. I cast thee by as one unfit for light, The visage was so irksome in my sight, Yet being mine own, at length affection would Thy blemishes amend, if so I could. I washed thy face, but more defects I saw, And rubbing off a spot, still made a flaw. I stretcht thy joints to make thee even feet, Yet still thou run’st more hobbling than is meet. In better dress to trim thee was my mind, But nought save home-spun cloth, i’ th’ house I find. In this array, ‘mongst vulgars may’st thou roam. In critics’ hands, beware thou dost not come, And take thy way where yet thou are not known. If for thy father askt, say, thou hadst none; And for thy mother, she alas is poor, Which caused her thus to send thee out of door.
  • 2. 
    The poem is developed mainly through ...
    • A. 

      Rhyme

    • B. 

      Iambic pentameter

    • C. 

      Simile

    • D. 

      Metaphor

    • E. 

      Conceit

  • 3. 
    The word "Thou" in line 1 indicatees ...
    • A. 

      The poem is a letter

    • B. 

      The poem is an invocation

    • C. 

      The speaker is employing apostrophe

    • D. 

      The speaker uses arcane vocabulary to make a point

    • E. 

      The poem is outdated

  • 4. 
    • A. 

      Enjambment

    • B. 

      Imagery

    • C. 

      Personification

    • D. 

      Explicit metaphor

    • E. 

      Exact rhyme

  • 5. 
    The words "trudge" (5) and "judge" (6) are examples of
    • A. 

      Internal rhyme

    • B. 

      Feminine rhyme

    • C. 

      Slant rhyme

    • D. 

      Masculine rhyme

    • E. 

      Iambs

  • 6. 
    Thou ill-form’d offspring of my feeble brain,  Who after birth did’st by my side remain,  Till snatcht from thence by friends, less wise than true,  Who thee abroad exposed to public view,  Made thee in rags, halting to th’ press to trudge,  Where errors were not lessened (all may judge).  At thy return my blushing was not small,  My rambling brat (in print) should mother call.  I cast thee by as one unfit for light,  The visage was so irksome in my sight,  Yet being mine own, at length affection would  Thy blemishes amend, if so I could.  I washed thy face, but more defects I saw,  And rubbing off a spot, still made a flaw.  I stretcht thy joints to make thee even feet,  Yet still thou run’st more hobbling than is meet.  In better dress to trim thee was my mind,  But nought save home-spun cloth, i’ th’ house I find.  In this array, ‘mongst vulgars may’st thou roam.  In critics’ hands, beware thou dost not come,  And take thy way where yet thou are not known.  If for thy father askt, say, thou hadst none; And for thy mother, she alas is poor,  Which caused her thus to send thee out of door.
  • 7. 
    The speaker implies her book is all of the following except...
    • A. 

      Inchoate

    • B. 

      Disseminated prematurely

    • C. 

      Fallible

    • D. 

      Irreparable

    • E. 

      Polemical

  • 8. 
    Who is the subject of the verb "Made" (5) ?
    • A. 

      The press

    • B. 

      Friends

    • C. 

      The speaker

    • D. 

      The book

    • E. 

      The offspring

  • 9. 
    • A. 

      Mournful

    • B. 

      Nurturing

    • C. 

      Self-deprecating

    • D. 

      Vengeful

    • E. 

      Acerbic

  • 10. 
    The poem's rhythm is composed of ...  I. iambic pentameter II. terza rima III. heroic couplets
    • A. 

      I only

    • B. 

      I and II only

    • C. 

      II and III only

    • D. 

      I and III only

    • E. 

      I, II, and III

  • 11. 
    Thou ill-form’d offspring of my feeble brain,  Who after birth did’st by my side remain,  Till snatcht from thence by friends, less wise than true,  Who thee abroad exposed to public view,  Made thee in rags, halting to th’ press to trudge,  Where errors were not lessened (all may judge).  At thy return my blushing was not small,  My rambling brat (in print) should mother call.  I cast thee by as one unfit for light,  The visage was so irksome in my sight,  Yet being mine own, at length affection would  Thy blemishes amend, if so I could.  I washed thy face, but more defects I saw,  And rubbing off a spot, still made a flaw.  I stretcht thy joints to make thee even feet,  Yet still thou run’st more hobbling than is meet.  In better dress to trim thee was my mind,  But nought save home-spun cloth, i’ th’ house I find.  In this array, ‘mongst vulgars may’st thou roam.  In critics’ hands, beware thou dost not come,  And take thy way where yet thou are not known.  If for thy father askt, say, thou hadst none; And for thy mother, she alas is poor,  Which caused her thus to send thee out of door.
  • 12. 
    The relationship between the speaker and her addressee is most similar to the relationship between...
    • A. 

      A teacher and a student

    • B. 

      A nurturing father and a child

    • C. 

      A boss and an employee

    • D. 

      A fastidious artist and her painting

    • E. 

      A director and an actor

  • 13. 
    • A. 

      An artist's relationship with her work

    • B. 

      An artist's dislike for her work

    • C. 

      The need for editing before publication

    • D. 

      Unreasonable critics

    • E. 

      The hardships of motherhood