Poetry And Literary Terms

50 Questions | Total Attempts: 198

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Poetry And Literary Terms

After the poetry unit and review of the Literary Terms/studying them CAREFULLY take this test on poetry and literary terms. . . . . Take your time, remember to read each question and ALL answers carefully. REMEMBER TO READ POEMS AT LEAST 3 TIMES and ANALYZE (Think about the poem carefully, break them apart, ask questions to yourself as we have in class,etc. ) before answering questions about them. . . . . . Choose the BEST answer. THINK carefully before answering! You will NEED A LITERATURE TEXTBOOK (several poems are taken from it, but you may only use the poem/not any other parts of the text for information) AND a READING COMPREHENSION EOG Review booklet. . . . . .


Questions and Answers
  • 1. 
    Choose the correct letter for the term that matches the definition given in Questions 1-15         The repetition of a consonant sound at the beginning of words, and, in some  traditions, at beginning of strongly stressed syllables.
    • A. 

      Assonance

    • B. 

      Alliteration

    • C. 

      Repeition

    • D. 

      Metaphor

  • 2. 
    One piece of poetry (or other literary work) makes reference to another piece of literature, character, or famous situation within the poem ---such as, "We aren't in Kansas anymore!"  would be a reference to The Wizard of Oz. 
    • A. 

      Assonance

    • B. 

      Alliteration

    • C. 

      Allusion

    • D. 

      Lumination

  • 3. 
    Words that ALMOST Rhyme.
    • A. 

      Allusion

    • B. 

      Exact Rhyme

    • C. 

      Rhythm

    • D. 

      Approximate Rhyme

  • 4. 
    The means by which writers present and reveal character. Writers typically reveal characters through their speech, dress, manner, and actions.
    • A. 

      Characters

    • B. 

      Characterization

    • C. 

      Speaker

    • D. 

      Point of View

  • 5. 
    A writer’s choice of words, particularly for clarity, effectiveness, and precision. A writer’s diction can be formal or informal, abstract or concrete.
    • A. 

      Word Choice

    • B. 

      Characterization

    • C. 

      Diction

    • D. 

      Speaker

  • 6. 
    The FEELING a word gives you...such as 'puppy' usually ignites the feeling of happiness and warmth/giggles....while 'rat' or 'bat' usually ignites the icky feeling for most people   
    • A. 

      Consonance

    • B. 

      Connotation

    • C. 

      Denotation

    • D. 

      Assonance

  • 7. 
    Broad term --or umbrella term which covers NUMEROUS poetic terminology such as:  simile, metaphor, personification, connotation, imagery, etc.
    • A. 

      Onomatopeia

    • B. 

      Allegory

    • C. 

      Simile

    • D. 

      Figurative Language

  • 8. 
    The matching of final vowel or consonant sounds in two or more words. As seen in this poem with 1st and 3rd lines and 2nd and 4th lines demonstrating it.... "Whenever Richard Cory went down town, We people on the pavement looked at him; He was a gentleman from sole to crown Clean favored and imperially slim."
    • A. 

      Assonance

    • B. 

      Rhyme

    • C. 

      Rhythm

    • D. 

      Meter

  • 9. 
    When readers know more about a situation or a character in a story than the characters do              
    • A. 

      Situational Irony

    • B. 

      Dramatic Irony

    • C. 

      Verbal Irony

    • D. 

      Simple Irony

  • 10. 
    Occurs when someone states one thing and means another  (Sarcasm
    • A. 

      Situational Irony

    • B. 

      Verbal Irony

    • C. 

      Dramatic Irony

    • D. 

      Simple Irony

  • 11. 
    • A figure of speech that compares two unlike things and shows their 
    similarities.   As seen in:   He was a bear!   or My cat is a lamb.”
    • A. 

      Simile

    • B. 

      Metaphor

    • C. 

      Personification

    • D. 

      Dramatic Irony

  • 12. 
    A long, stately poem in stanzas of varied length, meter, and form. Usually a serious poem on an exalted subject
    • A. 

      Narrative Poem

    • B. 

      Sonnet

    • C. 

      Ode

    • D. 

      Limerick

  • 13. 
     four line stanzas of any kind, rhymed, metered, or otherwise.
    • A. 

      Couplet

    • B. 

      Quatrain

    • C. 

      Quadruplet

    • D. 

      Cinqo

  • 14. 
    -the person, creature, etc. whose point of view the poem is TOLD FROM ---different from poet because a poet could be a man, but write from a child's or a bird's standpoint, etc. 
    • A. 

      Stanza

    • B. 

      Character

    • C. 

      Speaker

    • D. 

      Point of View

  • 15. 
     The measured pattern of rhythmic accents in poems  ---stressed and unstressed
    • A. 

      Meter

    • B. 

      Rhythm

    • C. 

      Rhyme

    • D. 

      Assonance

  • 16. 
    In your TEXTBOOK, turn to pages 678 and 679.....DO NOT TURN TO OTHER PAGES IN THE TEXT!!!   Until otherwise noted on this quiz, the questions relate to THE TWO POEMS ON THESE PAGES!! Using "An Indian Summer Day on the Prairie" (page 678) answer the next 8 questions  (you will be instructed when the poem changes!) - In the first stanza, the speaker personifies the sun as ---
    • A. 

      A tribe from Illinois

    • B. 

      Three red planets

    • C. 

      A girl from a specific tribe

    • D. 

      The beginning of the day

  • 17. 
    In each stanza of "An Indian Summer Day...." the poet develops
    • A. 

      A list of unrelated ideas in each of the five lines

    • B. 

      Great hyperbole that describes a single item

    • C. 

      One idea in a single sentence

    • D. 

      Vivid imagery that describes a single item

  • 18. 
    In the beginning line of each stanza of "An Indian Summer Day.....", the poet states a .______________that describes the Sun.......
    • A. 

      Hyperbole

    • B. 

      Simile

    • C. 

      Personification

    • D. 

      Metaphor

  • 19. 
    The rhyme scheme of the FIRST stanza of this poem is....
    • A. 

      Abcc

    • B. 

      Abab

    • C. 

      Abcb

    • D. 

      Abba

  • 20. 
    In lines 9-12 the speaker uses an extended metaphor to compare the sun to ---
    • A. 

      Pale grass

    • B. 

      The noon sky

    • C. 

      A wounded deer

    • D. 

      Golden horns

  • 21. 
    In lines 13-16, a metaphor is seen in the the eagle building his nest  --------What is the metaphor representing?
    • A. 

      Western sky

    • B. 

      Setting sun

    • C. 

      Prairie hunters

    • D. 

      Wild deer

  • 22. 
    Which line from "An Indian Summer..." contains an example of assonanceass
    • A. 

      "The sun is a huntress young."

    • B. 

      "The sun is a smoldering fire"

    • C. 

      "And leaves not a bush of cloud"

    • D. 

      "The sun is an eagle old"

  • 23. 
    Which line from the poem contains an example of alliteration?
    • A. 

      "The sun is an Indian girl"

    • B. 

      "There in the windless west"

    • C. 

      "Atop of the spirit-cliffs"

    • D. 

      "he sun is an eagle old"

  • 24. 
    USE "The Sunflowers" to answer the next questions.......(Page 679) The speaker uses personification in the poem in order to,,,,,
    • A. 

      Show how flowers are like people

    • B. 

      Give the sunflowers more personality

    • C. 

      Express a connection with nature

    • D. 

      Make the poem become a Sonnet

  • 25. 
    In lines 1-7, the speaker uses a simile to compare the sound of the sunflower stalks to the ---
    • A. 

      Shape of the human face

    • B. 

      Sight of the burnished disks

    • C. 

      Noise made by ship masts

    • D. 

      Smell of green leaves

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