pH 105 Quiz.1

15 Questions | Total Attempts: 106

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PH Scale Quizzes & Trivia

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Questions and Answers
  • 1. 
    Aristotle claimed that a person creates her character through the actions that she consistently performs or through the habits she creates.  
    • A. 

      True

    • B. 

      False

  • 2. 
     Socrates
    • A. 

      Was the declared wisest man by the Delphi Oracle because he knew that he did not know.

    • B. 

      Claimed that an unexamined life is not worth living.

    • C. 

      Claimed that the man who does injustice to another harms himself more than he harms the one to whom he does injustice.

    • D. 

      Claimed that a human being flourishes, experiences real happiness, when the rational dimension of the human being orients, rules the courageous or spirited dimension and the appetitive (appetites) dimension of the human being.

    • E. 

      A and B

    • F. 

      B, C, D

    • G. 

      All of the Above

  • 3. 
    Socrates, Plato, and Aristotle held that the way one came to understand a thing was to understand its end or purpose.  In other words, they had a teleological view of reality.  
    • A. 

      True

    • B. 

      False

  • 4. 
    Like many philosophers through the centuries Socrates realized that making moral choices took a strong will.  It was not enough to know what was just or good; one also had to have the courage or strength of will to carry it out.  
    • A. 

      True

    • B. 

      False

  • 5. 
    Like most Greeks, Socrates held that the end of the human being was eudaimonia.  
    • A. 

      By that word he meant the flourishing, fulfillment, well-being, happiness of the human being.

    • B. 

      To know what the well-being of a human being is, one has to know what the human being is, what the nature of the human being is. This is Socrates' position.

    • C. 

      Because Socrates was realistic, he realized that the ultimate end of the human being is pleasure because that is what the human being is constantly seeking and never finds enough of.

    • D. 

      Socrates thought the end of the human being and her happiness had to be something lasting, permanent, not passing away or transitory. For him it was found in contemplation of the good.

    • E. 

      A, B, C

    • F. 

      A, B, D

    • G. 

      All of the Above

  • 6. 
     Aristotle
    • A. 

      Recognized that there are many goods; he was looking for the ultimate good, that good that we desire for its own sake and for which we desire all other goods.

    • B. 

      Would approve of the man who saw his ultimate good as the accumulation of wealth, power, and honor.

    • C. 

      Claimed that because it was reason that distinguished human beings from all other animals, the greatest happiness or fulfillment of the human being is in the use of his reason in a life of contemplation.

    • D. 

      Thought that the practice of virtue was the same for each person; so, for example, that there was a standard measure to tell whether one was acting courageously or justly or temperately – what would be a temperate act for one person would beexactly the same for another.

    • E. 

      A, B, C

    • F. 

      B, C

    • G. 

      A, C

  • 7. 
    Aristotle thought that virtue was acting consistently in choosing a mean between two extremes (deficiency and extreme) relative to ourselves.  
    • A. 

      True

    • B. 

      False

  • 8. 
    For Aristotle there was no role in virtue for consulting the advice of  those consider wise or following their example.  
    • A. 

      True

    • B. 

      False

  • 9. 
    For Aristotle freedom was a very important dimension of the human being.  Therefore, in the education of children he cautioned parents not to impose any restrictions on their children, to let them freely experience life so that on their own they could eventually come to understand what virtue is.  
    • A. 

      True

    • B. 

      False

  • 10. 
    For Aristotle, the family and villages have as their end, the state – the state is natural because the family is natural and since its end is the state, the state is natural.  For Aristotle the state is not based upon contracts but on the very nature of human beings and families.    
    • A. 

      True

    • B. 

      False

  • 11. 
    In engaging in arguments it is important to pay attention to what language is used in order to be sure that everyone is talking about the same thing and to recognize any emotional content of words.  
    • A. 

      True

    • B. 

      False

  • 12. 
     Various philosophers and others interested in moral issues, including justice, hold different principles or starting points in making judgment about what is right or wrong, just or unjust.  It is important to the see the reasons for these various positions in the process of deciding where one stands.  For example,  
    • A. 

      Those who believe in a completely free market claim that the notion of a “just price” makes no sense.

    • B. 

      Medieval philosophers thought that a “just price” should be determined by tradition and the intrinsic value of the goods.

    • C. 

      Some hold that there should be some safeguards placed on markets to insure values to society that cannot be achieved or preserved simply through the exercise of the market.

    • D. 

      Those who hold that we live in a pluralist society where there is no agreed on concept about what the good life is claim that no particular virtues should be fostered by the state and that there are no principles at all by which cooperation among members can be reached.

    • E. 

      A and D

    • F. 

      A, B, C

    • G. 

      All of the Above

  • 13. 
    The Myth of the Cave 
    • A. 

      Is similar to the Myth of the Gyres – it imagines how people are able to gain freedom through invisibility to do whatever they want.

    • B. 

      Claims that most human beings are like prisoners chained facing a wall so that they only see shadows and echoes. They are chained by their passions and prejudices and the passions and prejudices of others that are imposed on them through rhetoric.

    • C. 

      Indicates that the climb out the shadows into the truth is a hard and difficult journey.

    • D. 

      Shows that most people are willing to face the light if they are given a chance.

    • E. 

      B and C

    • F. 

      A and D

    • G. 

      A, B, C

  • 14. 
    The film Unthinkable illustrates the following.  
    • A. 

      The fact is that very often people will torture others because of race prejudice; it is clear that part of the motive of H for torturing Yusuf is race prejudice, to avenge his wife who is an East Asian

    • B. 

      In regard to H there is no indication in the film of Aristotle’s claim that to some degree we become what we do, that H’s participation in torture has a negative affect upon him

    • C. 

      Kavanuagh thinks that the prevalent (prevailing, common) worldview of Americans is utilitarianism; that is the major philosophical outlook in Unthinkable.

    • D. 

      When Brody asks will it work, she indicates that she has adopted the major outlook of the torturers.

    • E. 

      A, B, D

    • F. 

      B, C, D

    • G. 

      All of the Above

  • 15. 
    The correspondent in the film clip on the German case of torture indicated that human beings possess a dignity with rights that no one can take from them even when those persons have acted without dignity toward others – that is a Kantian position.  
    • A. 

      True

    • B. 

      False

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