Punctuation Final Assessment

10 Questions

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Punctuation Quizzes & Trivia

The following final assessment reviews punctuation for independent and dependent clauses, commas for different clause types, and comma splice errors.  


Questions and Answers
  • 1. 
    A conjunction is a joiner, a word that connects (conjoins) parts of a sentence.
    • A. 

      True

    • B. 

      False

  • 2. 
    You should always use a comma before the coordinating conjunction that connects an independent and dependent clause. 
    • A. 

      True

    • B. 

      False

  • 3. 
    The following is an example of a comma splice error:I enjoy traveling, I've been to almost all 50 states. 
    • A. 

      True

    • B. 

      False

  • 4. 
    The following is an example of a fused sentence because the two independent clauses need to be separated somehow:She moved here from Oklahoma her family bought the house on Main Street.
    • A. 

      True

    • B. 

      False

  • 5. 
    Please review the following sentence and then choose the correct edit from the options below. The blinds on my window are new and they block the sunlight really well. 
    • A. 

      Add commas around the nonrestrictive clause "on my window"

    • B. 

      Add a comma after "new" before the coordinating conjunction "and"

    • C. 

      Delete the word "and" and just have a comma there instead

    • D. 

      No edits are needed; the sentence is fine as is.

  • 6. 
    Please review the following sentence and then choose the correct edit from the options below. The football game was still going on, and would probably go into overtime. 
    • A. 

      Remove the comma after "on" before the conjunction "and"

    • B. 

      Add a subject to this sentence so that we know what will go into overtime.

    • C. 

      Delete the word "and" and just leave the comma there instead

    • D. 

      No edits are needed; the sentence is fine as is.

  • 7. 
    Why does the phrase "which lived to be 12 years old" have commas around it? Jenny's pet as a child, which lived to be 12 years old, was a beautiful black cat. 
    • A. 

      The word "which" is a coordinating conjunction

    • B. 

      The phrase "which lived to be 12 years old" is a dependent clause and those should always be separated with commas.

    • C. 

      The phrase "which lived to be 12 years old" is a noun phrase and should always be separated with commas.

    • D. 

      The phrase "which lived to be 12 years old" is a nonrestrictive clause, so it should be separated from the noun phrase with commas.

  • 8. 
    Look at the sentence below. Why doesn't the phrase "that has the brand-new cover" have commas around it? The book on the shelf that has the brand-new cover on it is not for sale. 
    • A. 

      The word "that" is a coordinating conjunction

    • B. 

      The phrase "that has the brand-new cover" is a restrictive clause, and those are typically not set off by commas.

    • C. 

      The phrase "that has the brand-new cover" is a nonrestrictive clause and those should never be separated with commas.

    • D. 

      The phrase "that has the brand-new cover" is a noun phrase and should never be separated with commas.

  • 9. 
    Does the following sentence need a comma?If they want to read and write well students must practice every day.
    • A. 

      Yes. Add commas around the nonrestrictive phrase "and write"

    • B. 

      Yes. Add a comma after the coordinating conjunction.

    • C. 

      Yes. Add a comma after the introductory clause "If they want to read and write well"

    • D. 

      No. The sentence is fine as is.

  • 10. 
    Does the following sentence need a comma?To ride in a car without wearing a seatbelt would be dangerous.
    • A. 

      Yes. Add commas around the nonrestrictive phrase "without wearing a seatbelt"

    • B. 

      Yes. Add a comma after the coordinating conjunction.

    • C. 

      Yes. Add a comma after the introductory clause "To ride in a car without wearing a seatbelt"

    • D. 

      No. The sentence is fine as is, and adding a comma would create an error.