2015 -- Medical (Giving care)

10 Questions | Total Attempts: 34

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2015 -- Medical (Giving care)

Chances are you haven’t actually needed to use what you learned in a true, life-threatening cardiac emergency. But what if you are faced with an emergency some day? What do you really remember about CPR for adults?


Questions and Answers
  • 1. 
    You arrive at your office building when you hear a commotion from the stairwell. Someone dropped his morning latte as he hurried up the steps, you figure. But then a frantic employee runs down the stairs and shouts “Can anyone help? I think this guy is having a heart attack!” You run over and see a man you think you’ve seen in the hallways a few times. He is conscious and on the floor, sweaty and clutching his chest. A small crowd is gathering around him. You took CPR training last year. You’re pretty sure you remember most of it, but panic is setting in fast. What should you do?
    • A. 

      Say “Someone should call 9-1-1!” and head for the elevator. Quite a few people are already in the stairwell and you don’t want to be in the way when the professionals arrive.

    • B. 

      Call 9-1-1 from your cell phone and wait for help to arrive. That is the best thing to do; you don’t know what is wrong with him.

    • C. 

      Designate someone in the crowd to call 9-1-1, and then tell the ill person you are trained and ask if you can help.

    • D. 

      Tell the ill person you are going to help him. Monitor the person and call 9-1-1 only if his condition worsens.

  • 2. 
    Now that you’ve decided to act, time is of the essence! A friend in the crowd recognizes him as Frank from Accounting. You ask Frank some questions to see how he’s feeling. Frank mumbles that he needs to get to his morning meeting. He’s had chest pain before, and this is just his drive-thru breakfast bothering him now. You do manage to have him answer one question: “How long has this pain lasted?” “Well,” he replies, “I started feeling this crushing pain halfway through my morning commute.” After hearing this, you should:
    • A. 

      Be concerned; this sounds like a heart attack signal.

    • B. 

      Monitor Frank for changes in his condition, but it sounds like indigestion from that breakfast.

  • 3. 
    It’s after work. You’re at the gym for a workout, feeling pretty relieved after helping your new friend, Frank. But the whole experience has you thinking: What if you did have to perform CPR? You pick up a dumbbell and start working those biceps. You are pretty sure that to give effective chest compressions, you’re going to need to push down as hard as you can using your arm muscles. This statement is: 
    • A. 

      True. And while you’re at it, better tone up those triceps too.

    • B. 

      False. When it comes to CPR, arm muscles alone will only get you so far.

  • 4. 
    Your upper body workout is done, so you head to the spin class that’s just starting. You slide your shoes into the clip-in pedals, which help ensure that your feet are in perfect position. It reminds you of how important proper placement is in CPR, too! Which of the following diagrams shows correct hand placement for chest compressions
    • A. 

      Position 1: Slightly above the center of the chest

    • B. 

      Position 2: The upper left region of the chest

    • C. 

      Position 3: The center of the chest

    • D. 

      Position 4: Slightly below the center of the chest, where the notch is felt

  • 5. 
    You’ve had a good work out, but you are still thinking about your CPR training. You remember learning that for CPR to be effective, you must give 30 compressions, hard and fast. That’s going to take some real stamina (It’s a good thing you took that spin class after all!). But what is the recommended rate (speed) of compressions?
    • A. 

      At least 50 compressions a minute

    • B. 

      At least 100 compressions a minute

    • C. 

      About 50 compressions a minute

    • D. 

      At least 200 compressions a minute

  • 6. 
    Of course, cardiac emergencies can happen anywhere, even at home. Just ask your Uncle Phil, who had a heart attack last year in bed (his wife thought he just overslept). Fortunately, your fast-thinking cousin found him and realized he was unconscious, not sleeping. If it were you who found Uncle Phil in his bed unconscious and not breathing, what would be your first move after calling 9-1-1? 
    • A. 

      Put a pillow or rolled blanket under him for added support, then perform CPR.

    • B. 

      Wait for EMS to arrive. Only a professional responder should deal with this kind of situation.

    • C. 

      Quickly move him to the floor then perform CPR.

    • D. 

      Perform CPR in the position you find him.

  • 7. 
    At last, it’s time to unwind. A cup of cocoa would hit the spot right about now. You wait by the microwave, tapping your fingers in anticipation. You laugh at your impatience—it’s only a few seconds! But seconds matter in CPR, especially when it comes to rescue breaths. How many seconds should each rescue breath last to be effective?
    • A. 

      About a 1/2 second

    • B. 

      About 1 second

    • C. 

      About 3 seconds

    • D. 

      About 4 seconds

  • 8. 
    You decide to end the day by kicking back with some TV. A popular show featuring an impossibly-good looking hospital staff is on. In a dramatic scene, one doctor quickly begins giving CPR to a patient whose cardiac monitor suddenly flat lines. The action continues until signs of a heart beat suddenly return. Of course, if you ever needed to give CPR, you wouldn’t have the benefit of a machine to let you know when it’s okay to stop. But how do you know? All of the following are reasons when you may stop giving CPR, except for which one? 
    • A. 

      You notice an obvious sign of life, such as breathing.

    • B. 

      An AED is available and ready to use.

    • C. 

      You are concerned that you are hurting the person.

    • D. 

      Another trained responder or EMS personnel take over

  • 9. 
    Really, it’s been a pretty good day. You made a difference with your knowledge of what to do for a heart attack victim, and you just heard from a co-worker that Frank should be okay. Still, you can’t help but question what would happen if you had to go all the way and perform CPR. Do you really remember enough of what to do? Surely the average person retains at least 90% of what they are taught in training, even nearly a year out. Right? 
    • A. 

      True. CPR is like riding a bike … you never forget!

    • B. 

      False. Think about it, you once knew all of the state capitals too.

  • 10. 
    Wanda from Reception is getting anxious as Frank continues to clutch his chest in pain. “How long will it take for the ambulance to arrive? What are we supposed to do now?” she urges. You know you want to do the best you can for Frank. You take a moment to remember your training: Being calm and reassuring is a big help. You also remember to gather up as much information as possible from bystanders and ask Frank if he has a history of heart disease (he doesn’t). What else should you do?
    • A. 

      Recognize that Wanda is right. The ambulance hasn’t arrived and time is of the essence. Ask Wanda or another bystander to help you assist Frank into your car so you can drive him to the hospital.

    • B. 

      Encourage Frank to drink water or a sports drink until EMS arrives. Continue to monitor his condition.

    • C. 

      Help Frank rest comfortably and help loosen his tie and collar. Continue to monitor his condition.

    • D. 

      Ask Wanda or another bystander to help you assist Frank with walking to improve his circulation until EMS arrives.

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