Ch. 4 Crimes And Criminal Procedures

30 Questions

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Crime Quizzes & Trivia

Questions and Answers
  • 1. 
    Misdemeanors are crimes punishable by:
    • A. 

      Fines greater than $1000 and more than a year in jail

    • B. 

      House arrest

    • C. 

      Terms at a detention center

    • D. 

      Fines less than $1000 and less than a year in jail

  • 2. 
    Felonies are crimes punishable by:
    • A. 

      Fines greater than $1000 and more than a year in jail

    • B. 

      House arrest

    • C. 

      Terms at a detention center

    • D. 

      Fines less than $1000 and less than a year in jail

  • 3. 
    Possible punishments for crime include all of the following except:
    • A. 

      Probation

    • B. 

      Community service

    • C. 

      Jail or prison

    • D. 

      Immobility

  • 4. 
    Crimes are offenses against society.
    • A. 

      True

    • B. 

      False

  • 5. 
    If someone is acquitted of a crime, they are found to be :
    • A. 

      Insane

    • B. 

      Innocent

    • C. 

      Guilty

    • D. 

      Not guilty

  • 6. 
    The following are all elements of a crime except:
    • A. 

      Duty

    • B. 

      Breach of duty

    • C. 

      Criminal intent

    • D. 

      Conviction

  • 7. 
    Punishments are imposed on those convicted of crimes for all of the following reasons except to:
    • A. 

      Discourage future negative behavior

    • B. 

      Remove offender from society

    • C. 

      Provide counseling to troubled kids

    • D. 

      Give time to rehabilitate offender to rejoin society

  • 8. 
    White-collar crimes are also known as:
    • A. 

      Hate crimes

    • B. 

      Business crimes

    • C. 

      Crimes against the government

    • D. 

      Limited crimes

  • 9. 
    Examples of white collar crimes are:
    • A. 

      Extortion and Theft

    • B. 

      Murder and rape

    • C. 

      Jaywalking and littering

    • D. 

      Speeding and not stopping at a stop sign

  • 10. 
    Examples of felonies are:
    • A. 

      Speeding and not stopping at stop sign

    • B. 

      Murder and rape

    • C. 

      Jaywalking and littering

    • D. 

      Trespass and indecent exposure

  • 11. 
    The following are classifications of crimes except
    • A. 

      People

    • B. 

      Property

    • C. 

      Plea bargaining

    • D. 

      Government

  • 12. 
    • A. 

      The weapon used in the crime

    • B. 

      The explanation of the crime

    • C. 

      Someone with the person who actually commits the crime

    • D. 

      The "get-away" vehicle

  • 13. 
    The following are defenses to a crime except:
    • A. 

      Insanity

    • B. 

      Immunity

    • C. 

      Alibi

    • D. 

      Ignorance of the law

  • 14. 
    • A. 

      A lie

    • B. 

      Proof that you were somewhere else than the place/time the crime was committed

    • C. 

      A felony

    • D. 

      A crazy person

  • 15. 
    Plea bargaining is:
    • A. 

      A criminal who begs and pleads for mercy

    • B. 

      The accused agrees to plead guilty and give up their right to a trial in exchange for lighter punishment.

    • C. 

      Sport played in Yemen

    • D. 

      A form of punishment for the criminal

  • 16. 
    Plea bargaining is used for the following reasons except:
    • A. 

      Reduce number of cases and cost in the court system

    • B. 

      Speed up the conviction of the criminal

    • C. 

      Reduce crowding in the jails

    • D. 

      To give criminals a free education

  • 17. 
    Use of plea bargaining is often criticized for the reasons shown below except for:
    • A. 

      The guilty get off too easy

    • B. 

      Criminals don't learn their lesson when it is used

    • C. 

      Doesn't discourage future criminal behavior

    • D. 

      Saves time and money in the legal system

  • 18. 
    "Immunity" is:
    • A. 

      When someone is with someone who commits a crime

    • B. 

      Ignorance of the law

    • C. 

      Illegal

    • D. 

      Protection from prosecution in exchange for providing information on ("ratting out" ) someone else

  • 19. 
    Self-defense is defined as:
    • A. 

      Use of force to protect yourself, your family, or property are in immediate threat of danger or harm

    • B. 

      Making a deal with the prosecution to reduce your sentence

    • C. 

      Stealing from your employer

    • D. 

      An illegal activity

  • 20. 
    • A. 

      Society= meaning the "state"; prosecution

    • B. 

      Plaintiff

    • C. 

      A judge

    • D. 

      A jury

  • 21. 
    • A. 

      All

    • B. 

      Half

    • C. 

      3/4

    • D. 

      1/4

  • 22. 
    The decision reached by a jury is known as a:
    • A. 

      Opinion

    • B. 

      Verdict

    • C. 

      Recommendation

    • D. 

      Immunity

  • 23. 
    The "state" (prosecution) has the burden of proof, meaning they have to prove beyond a reasonable doubt that the accused is guilty of the crime. What does this mean?
    • A. 

      Only has to prove the defendant may have committed the crime

    • B. 

      Has the option to plea bargain

    • C. 

      Guilt by reason of insanity

    • D. 

      Leaving no doubt there could be no one else that committed this crime

  • 24. 
    In a trial, who makes the decision of the punishment for the guilty?
    • A. 

      Jury

    • B. 

      Lawyers

    • C. 

      Prosecutor

    • D. 

      Judge

  • 25. 
    The verdicts rendered by the jury are either guilty or not guilty.
    • A. 

      True

    • B. 

      False

  • 26. 
    If the accused is found to be mentally incompetent (either by insanity or lack of mental capacity (low IQ or mental illness)) society says they are not to be held responsible for their actions.
    • A. 

      True

    • B. 

      False

  • 27. 
    During a pre-trial hearing (arraignment), a judge could send the accused to jail and set bail. What is bail?
    • A. 

      Property or money given to ensure that the person released from jail will return to court at a later date

    • B. 

      Money to bribe the judge to release the person from jail

    • C. 

      A deal arranged between prosecution and the accused for a lighter punishment

    • D. 

      A felony

  • 28. 
    Larceny is defined as:
    • A. 

      Cruelty

    • B. 

      Theft

    • C. 

      Lying

    • D. 

      Repeating the same crime

  • 29. 
    When a suspect is "booked", that means he is photographed (mugshot) and fingerprinted.
    • A. 

      True

    • B. 

      False

  • 30. 
    Extortion is also known as:
    • A. 

      Detention center facility

    • B. 

      Bail

    • C. 

      Stealing

    • D. 

      Blackmail