Perception Quizzes For Weeks 1-5

50 Questions | Total Attempts: 143

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Perception Quizzes For Weeks 1-5


Questions and Answers
  • 1. 
    While____ involves the stimulation of sense organs, _____ involves the selection, organization, and interpretation of sensory input.
    • A. 

      Psychophysics; sensation

    • B. 

      Sensation; psychophysics

    • C. 

      Sensation; perception

    • D. 

      Perception; sensation

  • 2. 
    Which of the following would be the best example of sensation?
    • A. 

      A 440 Hz tone reaching your ear

    • B. 

      Thinking that the song on the radio is pleasant

    • C. 

      Being able to hear your name at a crowded party

    • D. 

      Knowing that your cat wants food based on the tone of its meow

  • 3. 
    Qualia are:
    • A. 

      Important aspects of all 5 methods of perception research

    • B. 

      Adorable birds with trademark headfeathers

    • C. 

      Private conscious experiences of sensation of perception

    • D. 

      Similar across all humans

  • 4. 
    The smallest detectable difference between two stimuli, or the minimum change in a stimulus that enables it to be correctly judged as different from a reference stimulus is:
    • A. 

      A just noticeable difference

    • B. 

      The constant of Steven's Power Law

    • C. 

      An absolute threshold

    • D. 

      A threshold limit

  • 5. 
    In Weber's law, what is k?
    • A. 

      The difference threshold

    • B. 

      The absolute threshold

    • C. 

      The measurement for the standard

    • D. 

      The constant value

  • 6. 
    In Fechner's Law R=k*log(S/S0), what is the term for the perceived magnitude?
    • A. 

      K

    • B. 

      R

    • C. 

      S

    • D. 

      S0

  • 7. 
    Dr. Pratter want's to measure a subject's auditory threshold. He presents stimuli  in descending and ascending orders of intensity, and the subject indicates when they can not detect the stimulus anymore (descending) or when they can barely detect the stimulus (ascending). Dr. Pratter then takes the average of the crossover values to be the threshold. What method is Dr. Pratter using?
    • A. 

      Magnitude estimation

    • B. 

      Method of adjustment

    • C. 

      Method of constant stimuli

    • D. 

      Method of limits

  • 8. 
    Dr. Richards is trying to determine the auditory threshold of a subject. She randomly presents different auditory stimuli, one at a time, and the subject indicates whether the stimulus is present or not (by saying "yes" or "no"). What method is Dr. Richards using?
    • A. 

      Method of limits

    • B. 

      Methods of adjustment

    • C. 

      Method of constant stimuli

    • D. 

      Magnitude estimation

  • 9. 
    Stevens' power law is:
    • A. 

      A principle defining quantitative relationships between physical and psychological (subjective) events

    • B. 

      A principle describing the relationship between stimulus and resulting sensation that says the just noticeable difference (JND) is a constant fraction of the comparison stimulus

    • C. 

      A principle describing the relationship between stimulus and resulting sensation that says the magnitude of subjective sensation is proportional to the stimulus magnitude raised to an exponent

    • D. 

      A principle describing the relationship between stimulus and resulting sensation that says the magnitude of subjective sensation increases proportionally to the logarithm of the stimulus intensity.

  • 10. 
    Physchophysics is:
    • A. 

      In philosophy, a private conscious experience of sensation or perception

    • B. 

      The ability to organize, discriminate, categorize sensory information and use it for action, which is an overt behavior (e.g., pressing a button, driving)

    • C. 

      The science of defining quantitative relationships between physical and psychological (subjective) events

    • D. 

      The first stages in which physical patterns are converted to neural patterns

  • 11. 
    Signal detection theory consists of
    • A. 

      Signal and noise

    • B. 

      Thresholds

    • C. 

      Receivers

    • D. 

      Transducers

  • 12. 
    If a stimulus is absent and the observer reports it as absent, this is called a 
    • A. 

      False alarm

    • B. 

      Miss

    • C. 

      Hit

    • D. 

      Correct rejection

  • 13. 
    Airport security is very tight. If a traveler even jokes about a bomb, they are detained and questioned to ensure that no real terrorist threat succeeds. In terms of signal detection theory, airport security would rather have a _______ than a _______.
    • A. 

      Miss; correct rejection

    • B. 

      Correct rejection; miss

    • C. 

      False alarm; miss

    • D. 

      Hit; miss

  • 14. 
    The curves in the figure below are known as: 
    • A. 

      Power curves

    • B. 

      ROC curves

    • C. 

      JNDs

    • D. 

      Stimuli ratios

  • 15. 
    _______ is a mathematical procedure by which a signal can be separated into component sine waves at different frequencies. Combining these sine waves will reproduce the original signal.
    • A. 

      Fourier analysis

    • B. 

      Weber's law

    • C. 

      Signal detection theory

    • D. 

      Fechner's law

  • 16. 
    If you are in a completely dark room and accidentally hit your head, you might see “stars.” Despite the fact that there was only mechanical stimulation to your eyes and no light, you still had an experience of light. This fact is predicted by
    • A. 

      The doctrine of specific nerve energies

    • B. 

      The equal stimulation principle

    • C. 

      The Muller principle

    • D. 

      Dark adaptation

  • 17. 
    The chemical substance used in neuronal communication at synapses is known as a(an)
    • A. 

      Neurotransmitter

    • B. 

      Transducer

    • C. 

      Axon

    • D. 

      Receptor

  • 18. 
    _______ is a technique that, using multiple electrodes on the scalp, measures changes in electrical activity across populations of many neurons in the brain.
    • A. 

      EEG

    • B. 

      PET

    • C. 

      FMRI

    • D. 

      CT

  • 19. 
    _______ makes it possible to measure localized patterns of activity in the brain by tracing changing levels of blood oxygenation.
    • A. 

      MRI

    • B. 

      EEG

    • C. 

      FMRI

    • D. 

      MEG

  • 20. 
    The time or space required for one cycle of a repeating waveform is its 
    • A. 

      Sign

    • B. 

      Amplitude

    • C. 

      Wavelength

    • D. 

      Phase

  • 21. 
    Refraction is the 
    • A. 

      Redirection of light back toward its source

    • B. 

      Passing of light with no interruption

    • C. 

      Bending or spreading out of waves as they pass through a medium

    • D. 

      oscillation that travels through a medium

  • 22. 
    When something strikes a surface, especially light, sound, or heat, and is redirected (usually back toward its point of origin), it is being
    • A. 

      Refracted

    • B. 

      Scattered

    • C. 

      Absorbed

    • D. 

      Reflected

  • 23. 
    The aqueous humor is a(n)
    • A. 

      Gel-like fluid between the lens and retina

    • B. 

      circular opening at the center of the iris

    • C. 

      Watery fluid between the cornea and iris

    • D. 

      Funny substance

  • 24. 
    The vitreous humor is a(n)
    • A. 

      Circular opening at the center of the iris

    • B. 

      watery fluid between the cornea and iris

    • C. 

      Gel-like fluid between the lens and retina

    • D. 

      funny substance

  • 25. 
    The light-sensitive membrane at the back of the eye that contains rods and cones is called the
    • A. 

      Lens

    • B. 

      Cornea

    • C. 

      Iris

    • D. 

      Retina

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