English III-august 22, 2014

15 Questions | Total Attempts: 32

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English III-august 22, 2014

There are two parts to the test--you will receive a grade for the first half as soon as you press submit, however, the essays, are manually graded by me. All English classes: total amount of points for the test is 80. Honors classes: total amount of points for the test is 90. Assessment on Ethos, Pathos, and Logos, Use of reasoning in slave writings, comparing and contrasting --checking for similarities and differences, making inferences regarding the material, and understanding how reason and resilience helps a person overcome a difficult situation. Common Core State Standards:CCSS. ELA-LITERACY. RI. 11-12. 1Cite strong and thorough textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text, including determining where the text leaves mat


Questions and Answers
  • 1. 
    Compare, contrasts, look for hidden meanings in the Negro Spirituals "All God's Chullin Got Wings and "Didn't Old Pharaoh Get Lost." Provide examples from the text include page numbers. (Question is worth 10 points.)
  • 2. 
    Using the Wordle, write an essay--this essay will demonstrate that you have learned key words for this week. Essay should have the following components: beginning, middle, end, vivid language, transitions, and stays on topic.(Question is worth 20 points.)This essay should have five paragraphs!
  • 3. 
    Negro Spirituals consisted of the following: (choose 3)
    • A. 

      Protest

    • B. 

      Purpose

    • C. 

      Praise

    • D. 

      Propaganda

  • 4. 
    Slaves were from brought from the West Indies and Africa?
    • A. 

      True

    • B. 

      False

  • 5. 
    Slavery began as a westward expansion? 
    • A. 

      True

    • B. 

      False

  • 6. 
    When writing an essay, you want to have the following (choose three)
    • A. 

      Beginning, Middle, and End

    • B. 

      Appropriate word choice

    • C. 

      Proper grammar

    • D. 

      Subject-verb disagreement

  • 7. 
    Slave code songs were a means of telling their master, which direction they were headed towards for freedom?
    • A. 

      True

    • B. 

      False

  • 8. 
    Examples of Slave Codes in North Carolina were (choose three)
    • A. 

      Runaway slaves could be killed on the spot.

    • B. 

      Slaves must have identification on them at all times.

    • C. 

      Free blacks were able to attend school and preach.

    • D. 

      Slaves were allowed to dance and sing.

  • 9. 
    North Carolina slave population grew (choose three)
    • A. 

      Initially there were approximately 6,000 Slaves.

    • B. 

      Slaves grew to 40,000

    • C. 

      Slaves outnumbered whites 2:1

    • D. 

      Slave births declined considerably from the 1600's to the 1800's.

  • 10. 
    Expectations of the slave. (Choose three)
    • A. 

      Speak softly

    • B. 

      Read and write

    • C. 

      Be obedient

    • D. 

      Be humble

  • 11. 
    Go to the Internet and research Ham from the Bible--in a outline of 10 items--explain how Ham was used as a basis for slavery. Cite work using Bibme.org, etc. (Question is worth 5 points.)
  • 12. 
    Honor's class (Only)--Choose a question from your lists of questions given in your notes and explain thoroughly the concepts in that question--most importantly--relate this question to slavery. If you use the Internet, you must cite your work using bibme.org. (Question is worth 20 points.)This should have five paragraphs.
  • 13. 
    Read the following paragraph--explain (in your own words) the difference between classical reasoning and practical reasoning--take quotes from the work. Use the citation below--to cite your work. (Points 5) In philosophy, practical reason is the use of reason to decide how to act. This contrasts with theoretical reason (often called speculative reason), which is the use of reason to decide what to follow. For example: agents use practical reason to decide whether to build a telescope, but theoretical reason to decide which of two theories of light and optics is the best. Practical reason is understood by most philosophers as determining a plan of action. Thomistic ethics defines the first principle of practical reason as "good is to be done and pursued, and evil is to be avoided."[1] For Kant, practical reason has a law-abiding quality because the categorical imperative is understood to be binding one to one's duty rather than subjective preferences. Utilitarians tend to see reason as an instrument for the satisfactions of wants and needs.In classical philosophical terms, it is very important to distinguish three domains of human activity: theoretical reason, which investigates the truth of contingent events as well as necessary truths; practical reason, which determines whether a prospective course of action is worth pursuing; and productive or technical reason, which attempts to find the best means for a given end. Aristotle viewed philosophical activity as the highest activity of the human being and gave pride of place to metaphysics or wisdom. Since Descartes, practical judgment and reasoning have been treated with less respect because of the demand for greater certainty and an infallible method to justify beliefs.Wikipedia contributors. "Practical reason." Wikipedia, The Free Encyclopedia. Wikipedia, The Free Encyclopedia, 14 Jul. 2014. Web. 22 Aug. 2014.
  • 14. 
    Click on the link--and describe, using vivid language three of the pictures you saw (Question is worth 5 points): http://www.history.com/topics/black-history/slavery/pictures/slave-trade/point-of-no-return-monument-on-the-route-des-esclaves 
  • 15. 
    Explain in your own words how you met the Common Core Standards--citing examples from the Common Core statements from each of the standards below (Use I statements to address each standard) (5 points):Common Core State Standards:CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.RI.11-12.1Cite strong and thorough textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text, including determining where the text leaves matters uncertain.CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.W.11-12.1.AIntroduce precise, knowledgeable claim(s), establish the significance of the claim(s), distinguish the claim(s) from alternate or opposing claims, and create an organization that logically sequences claim(s), counterclaims, reasons, and evidence.CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.W.11-12.2Write informative/explanatory texts to examine and convey complex ideas, concepts, and information clearly and accurately through the effective selection, organization, and analysis of content.​CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.SL.11-12.1.ACome to discussions prepared, having read and researched material under study; explicitly draw on that preparation by referring to evidence from texts and other research on the topic or issue to stimulate a thoughtful, well-reasoned exchange of ideas.
  • 16. 
    Tomorrow is Alon Gaudet's birthday make sure to wish him a very happy birthday. Alon, enjoy your birthday, you have made a powerful impact on so many people--keep up the great work. Dr. Handy
  • 17. 
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  • 18. 
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  • 19. 
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