Advanced Psychology - Qp9

10 Questions | Total Attempts: 469

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Advanced Psychology - Qp9

Questions and Answers
  • 1. 
    Interpersonal perception refers to the way in which we make assumptions about the personality characteristics that other people possess.
    • A. 

      True

    • B. 

      False

  • 2. 
    Peripheral traits are held to influence global perception because they are evaluative - to do with whether the person is liked or disliked.
    • A. 

      True

    • B. 

      False

  • 3. 
    ______ looked at how global perception affected the participants’ interaction with a real person.
    • A. 

      Asch

    • B. 

      Kelley

    • C. 

      Luchins

    • D. 

      Jones

  • 4. 
    Recency refers to the way in which our perception is influenced by what we learn about the person later on.
    • A. 

      True

    • B. 

      False

  • 5. 
    Heider (1944) was the first to study the attribution process. He made three basic points: (Select two)
    • A. 

      People have a tendency to perceive behaviour as happening on its own.

    • B. 

      We need to understand how people make these perceptions

    • C. 

      These perceptions are generally based on ideas that the behaviour we see is due to either the person (internal causes), the situation (external causes) or a combination of both.

  • 6. 
    _______ refers to the distinctive features of the behaviour and the choices available.
    • A. 

      Analysis of the non-common effects of the person’s behaviour

    • B. 

      Social desirability

  • 7. 
    Correspondent Inference theory helps you to make a decision about why people are behaving in a particular way.
    • A. 

      True

    • B. 

      False

  • 8. 
    ______ refers to a tendency for actors and observers to make different attributions about the same event.
    • A. 

      Fundamental attribution error

    • B. 

      Actor-Observer Effect

    • C. 

      Self-serving attributional bias

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