Mixtures, Compounds, And Elements

5 Questions | Total Attempts: 44

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Mixtures, Compounds, And Elements

IPS chapter 5 & 6 concepts


Questions and Answers
  • 1. 
    Suppose you wish to separate a mixture of substance I and substance II by fractional distillation.  In what property must substances I and II differ?
    • A. 

      Boiling point

    • B. 

      Solubility

    • C. 

      Density

    • D. 

      Melting point

    • E. 

      None of the above

  • 2. 
    We electrolyze water and obtain 20 cm3 of hydrogen and 10 cm3 of oxygen.  We mix these gases with an additional 10 cm3 of hydrogen, and pass a spark through the mixture.  What do you predict would be observed?
    • A. 

      No action takes place, since the amounts of hydrogen and oxygen have been changed.

    • B. 

      The gases combine completely to form water.

    • C. 

      The gases combine completely, but the product is root beer.

    • D. 

      Water is formed, but 10 cm3 of hydrogen is left uncombined.

    • E. 

      Water is formed, but 10 cm3 of oxygen is left uncombined.

  • 3. 
    The table below shows the results of tests on five samples of matter.     sample Separated into fractions by distillation Separated into fractions by mixing with water and filtering Separated into components by electrolysis 1 2 3 4 5 yes no -- no no -- no yes no yes -- no yes yes yes   According to the table, which of the samples probably contain only one element?
    • A. 

      Both 1 and 2

    • B. 

      Both 1 and 4

    • C. 

      1 only

    • D. 

      2 only

    • E. 

      4 only

  • 4. 
    The table below shows the results of tests on five samples of matter.     sample Separated into fractions by distillation Separated into fractions by mixing with water and filtering Separated into components by electrolysis 1 2 3 4 5 yes no -- no no -- no yes no yes -- no yes yes yes According to the table, which of the samples are definitely mixtures?
    • A. 

      1, 2, 3, and 5

    • B. 

      3, 4, and 5

    • C. 

      2, 3, and 5

    • D. 

      1, 2, and 3

    • E. 

      1, 3, and 5

  • 5. 
    Equal volumes of hydrochloric Acid were poured into eight evaporating dishes. Zinc strips of varying mass were added to each Dish and left until the reaction stopped.  Each solution was then evaporated to dryness, and the mass of the residue (zinc chloride) was determined.  Class data were graphed as shown: If 3.0 g of zinc had been used in the experiment, the mass of zinc chloride formed would have been:
    • A. 

      About 1.5 g

    • B. 

      About 6.0 g

    • C. 

      About 14.5 g

    • D. 

      Dependent upon the time it took to complete the reaction.

    • E. 

      Impossible to determine from these data.

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