Hematology Exam Questions! Trivia Quiz

56 Questions | Total Attempts: 263

SettingsSettingsSettings
Please wait...
Hematology Exam Questions! Trivia Quiz

Are you preparing for a hematology exam? Just how knowledgeable are you when it comes to the field of hematology? Do you know the various diseases that humans are threatened with when it comes to blood and the right amount of blood components within the body and their given functions? Try answering the hematology exam questions in this trivia quiz and see how much revision you actually require. All the best!


Questions and Answers
  • 1. 
    The anemia of chronic disease is characterized by:
    • A. 

      A normal level of serum of iron

    • B. 

      Decreased transferrin

    • C. 

      A decreased circulating ferritin

    • D. 

      Normal or increased iron stores

  • 2. 
    Which of the following statements is true concerning hemoglobin (Hb) variants?
    • A. 

      Hb E and C can not be separated using alkaline-buffered agarose electrophoresis

    • B. 

      Hb A and Hb S can not be separated using acid-buffered agarose electrophoresis

    • C. 

      Hb F can not be resolved from Hb A2 using a combination of acid and alkaline electrophoresis

    • D. 

      Hb C and E can not be resolved using a combination of acid and alkaline electrophoresis

  • 3. 
    Which of the following are characteristics of beta-thalassemia major (B0)?
    • A. 

      Depleted normal hemoglobin A2

    • B. 

      Intramedullary death of RBC progenitors

    • C. 

      Extravascular hemolysis and splenomegaly

    • D. 

      Progressive lifetime iron overload

    • E. 

      All of the above

  • 4. 
    Rapid testing for glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase deficiency in a patient with active hemolysis and Plasmodium falciparum infection is best performed by:
    • A. 

      Isoelectric focusing electrophoresis

    • B. 

      Detection of G6PD mutation by PCR

    • C. 

      RBC kinetic colorimetric enzyme assay

    • D. 

      Testing a fraction of RBC enriched for reticulocytes

  • 5. 
    The most informative, sensitive and specific test for paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria utilizes which of the following methods?
    • A. 

      The autohemolysis assay

    • B. 

      The sucrose hemolysis

    • C. 

      Osmotic gradient ektacytometry

    • D. 

      The osmotic fragility assay

    • E. 

      CD 55 and CD 59 expression levels

    • F. 

      The direct antiglobin test

  • 6. 
    Which of the following methods has the most sensitivity and specificity for the diagnosis of hereditary spherocytosis?
    • A. 

      Autohemolysis assay

    • B. 

      Sucrose hemolysis assay

    • C. 

      Osmotic gradient ektacytometry

    • D. 

      Osmotic fragility assay

    • E. 

      CD 55 and C59 expression

  • 7. 
    A mutated stop codon produces this abnormal hemoglobin alpha chain:
    • A. 

      Hemoglobin Constant Spring

    • B. 

      Hemoglobin S

    • C. 

      Hemoglobin Lepore

    • D. 

      Hemoglobin Bart's

    • E. 

      Hemoglobin M

    • F. 

      Hemoglobin C

    • G. 

      Hemoglobin H

    • H. 

      Hemoglobin E

    • I. 

      Hemoglobin O Arab

  • 8. 
    This hemoglobin quaternary structure is composed of 4 gamma-globin polypeptides and has an abnormally high oxygen affinity:
    • A. 

      Hemoglobin Constant Spring

    • B. 

      Hemoglobin S

    • C. 

      Hemoglobin Lepore

    • D. 

      Hemoglobin Bart's

    • E. 

      Hemoglobin M

    • F. 

      Hemoglobin C

    • G. 

      Hemoglobin H

    • H. 

      Hemoglobin E

    • I. 

      Hemoglobin O Arab

  • 9. 
    This is the most prevalent hemoglobin variant in Southeast Asia
    • A. 

      Hemoglobin Constant Spring

    • B. 

      Hemoglobin S

    • C. 

      Hemoglobin Lepore

    • D. 

      Hemoglobin Bart's

    • E. 

      Hemoglobin M

    • F. 

      Hemoglobin C

    • G. 

      Hemoglobin H

    • H. 

      Hemoglobin E

    • I. 

      Hemoglobin A2

  • 10. 
    This unstable hemoglobin variant is composed of 4 beta polypeptide chains and, in large amounts, tends to form Heinz bodies.
    • A. 

      Hemoglobin Constant Spring

    • B. 

      Hemoglobin S

    • C. 

      Hemoglobin Lepore

    • D. 

      Hemoglobin Bart's

    • E. 

      Hemoglobin M

    • F. 

      Hemoglobin C

    • G. 

      Hemoglobin H

    • H. 

      Hemoglobin E

    • I. 

      Hemoglobin A2

  • 11. 
    This hemoglobin variant co-migrates with hemoglobins C and E on alkaline agarose electrophoresis:
    • A. 

      Hemoglobin Constant Spring

    • B. 

      Hemoglobin S

    • C. 

      Hemoglobin Lepore

    • D. 

      Hemoglobin Bart's

    • E. 

      Hemoglobin M

    • F. 

      Hemoglobin C

    • G. 

      Hemoglobin H

    • H. 

      Hemoglobin E

    • I. 

      Hemoglobin A2

  • 12. 
    This hemoglobin is produced in abnormally high amounts when there are deletions of three alpha globin loci on chromosome 16
    • A. 

      Hemoglobin Constant Spring

    • B. 

      Hemoglobin S

    • C. 

      Hemoglobin Lepore

    • D. 

      Hemoglobin Bart's

    • E. 

      Hemoglobin M

    • F. 

      Hemoglobin C

    • G. 

      Hemoglobin H

    • H. 

      Hemoglobin E

    • I. 

      Hemoglobin A2

  • 13. 
    This is the most prevalent hemoglobin structural mutation in the world.
    • A. 

      Hemoglobin Constant Spring

    • B. 

      Hemoglobin S

    • C. 

      Hemoglobin Lepore

    • D. 

      Hemoglobin Bart's

    • E. 

      Hemoglobin M

    • F. 

      Hemoglobin C

    • G. 

      Hemoglobin H

    • H. 

      Hemoglobin E

    • I. 

      Hemoglobin A2

  • 14. 
    This hemoglobin variant has a lysine in position 26 of the beta-globin chain, instead of the usual glutamate.
    • A. 

      Hemoglobin Constant Spring

    • B. 

      Hemoglobin S

    • C. 

      Hemoglobin Lepore

    • D. 

      Hemoglobin Bart's

    • E. 

      Hemoglobin M

    • F. 

      Hemoglobin C

    • G. 

      Hemoglobin H

    • H. 

      Hemoglobin E

    • I. 

      Hemoglobin A2

  • 15. 
    This observation characterizes congenital dyserythropoietic anemias in general:
    • A. 

      Erythroblastic multinuclearity

    • B. 

      Hypocellular monocytopenia

    • C. 

      Selective loss of RBC progenitors

    • D. 

      Defects in chromosomal stability and repair

  • 16. 
    Diamond-Blackfan anemia is characterized by this finding:
    • A. 

      Erythroblastic multinuclearity

    • B. 

      Hypocellular monocytopenia

    • C. 

      Selective loss of RBC progenitors

    • D. 

      Defects in chromosomal stability and repair

  • 17. 
    This finding best characterizes Fanconi's anemia
    • A. 

      Erythroblastic multinuclearity

    • B. 

      Hypocellular monocytopenia

    • C. 

      Selective loss of RBC progenitors

    • D. 

      Defects in chromosomal stability and repair

  • 18. 
    Anemias which result from anti-intrinsic factor antibodies are characterized by which of the following RBC morphologies?
    • A. 

      Microcytic, hypochromic

    • B. 

      Normochromic, macrocytic

    • C. 

      Macrocytic, hypochromic

    • D. 

      Normochromic normocytic

  • 19. 
    This phenomenon is the cause of the premature death of RBC progenitors in beta thalassemia major.
    • A. 

      Depletion of RBC NADPH and glutathione levels

    • B. 

      Precipitation of excess alpha globin chains

    • C. 

      Mutation in spectrin affecting contact region between spectrin dimers

    • D. 

      One normal and abnormally mutated anion channel protein

    • E. 

      Complement-mediated intravascular hemolysis

    • F. 

      Precipitation of hemoglobin containing 4 beta-globin chains

    • G. 

      Mutation in spectrin affecting contact with plasma membrane

  • 20. 
    This is the cause of the hemolysis seen in glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase deficiency.
    • A. 

      Depletion of RBC NADPH and glutathione levels

    • B. 

      Precipitation of excess alpha globin chains

    • C. 

      Mutation in spectrin affecting contact region between spectrin dimers

    • D. 

      One normal and abnormally mutated anion channel protein

    • E. 

      Complement-mediated intravascular hemolysis

    • F. 

      Precipitation of hemoglobin containing 4 beta-globin chains

    • G. 

      Mutation in spectrin affecting contact with plasma membrane

  • 21. 
    This represents the genetic defect in hereditary pyropoikocytosis:
    • A. 

      Depletion of RBC NADPH and glutathione levels

    • B. 

      Precipitation of excess alpha globin chains

    • C. 

      Mutation in one alpha spectrin gene, deletion of the other

    • D. 

      One normal and abnormally mutated anion channel protein

    • E. 

      Complement-mediated intravascular hemolysis

    • F. 

      Precipitation of hemoglobin containing 4 beta-globin chains

    • G. 

      Mutation in spectrin affecting contact with plasma membrane

  • 22. 
    This is the reason for the appearance of Heinz bodies seen in alpha thalassemia
    • A. 

      Depletion of RBC NADPH and glutathione levels

    • B. 

      Precipitation of excess alpha globin chains

    • C. 

      Mutation in one alpha spectrin gene, deletion of the other

    • D. 

      One normal and abnormally mutated anion channel protein

    • E. 

      Complement-mediated intravascular hemolysis

    • F. 

      Precipitation of hemoglobin containing 4 beta-globin chains

    • G. 

      Mutation in spectrin affecting contact with plasma membrane

  • 23. 
    This is the cause of hemolysis in paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria:
    • A. 

      Depletion of RBC NADPH and glutathione levels

    • B. 

      Precipitation of excess alpha globin chains

    • C. 

      Mutation in one alpha spectrin gene, deletion of the other

    • D. 

      One normal and abnormally mutated anion channel protein

    • E. 

      Complement-mediated intravascular hemolysis

    • F. 

      Precipitation of hemoglobin containing 4 beta-globin chains

    • G. 

      Mutation in spectrin affecting contact with plasma membrane

  • 24. 
    This is frequently found in cases of hereditary spherocytosis:
    • A. 

      Depletion of RBC NADPH and glutathione levels

    • B. 

      Precipitation of excess alpha globin chains

    • C. 

      Mutation in one alpha spectrin gene, deletion of the other

    • D. 

      One normal and abnormally mutated anion channel protein

    • E. 

      Complement-mediated intravascular hemolysis

    • F. 

      Precipitation of hemoglobin containing 4 beta-globin chains

    • G. 

      Quantitative spectrin deficiency

  • 25. 
    Patients with B-cell lymphomas, infectious mononucleosis, and B-lymphocyte leukemias are at increased risk of which of the following types of anemia?
    • A. 

      Paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria

    • B. 

      Autoimmune hemolytic

    • C. 

      Acquired elliptocytosis

    • D. 

      Congenital dyserythroblastic anemia

Related Topics
Back to Top Back to top