New Testament Summary

12 Questions

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New Testament Quizzes & Trivia

Tests the knowledge of the individual books of the New Testament.


Questions and Answers
  • 1. 
    This book shows Paul defending his apostolic authority, describes the ministry of reconciliation within and outside of the church. Also shows further development of the church as a spiritual "body." Paul seems to imply that believers are already developing a spiritual body which will clothe them at the moment of death, as each becomes a new creation and that spiritual renewal is God's plan for reconciling humanity to Himself.
    • A. 

      2 Corinthians

    • B. 

      Ephesians

    • C. 

      Galatians

    • D. 

      1 Peter

    • E. 

      Colossians

  • 2. 
    This Book is an earnest declaration of Christianity's independence from Judaism, defends Paul's doctrine of salvation by faith, closely examines his own spiritual state attempting to show how the human experience of Christ achieves what the law failed to do-- assure him of God's love and acceptance.
    • A. 

      Colossians

    • B. 

      1 Thessalonians

    • C. 

      1 Corinthians

    • D. 

      Galatians

    • E. 

      Phillippians

  • 3. 
    This book is a warm and friendly communication with the first church established in Europe. It includes Paul's quotation or composition of an early Christian hymn that depicts Jesus as Adam's opposite... a humbly obedient son whose self-emptying leads to his heavenly exaltation. Paul's use of the Greek "morphe/form" may refer to the divine image that both Adam and Jesus reflect.
    • A. 

      Ephesians

    • B. 

      Phillippians

    • C. 

      2 Timothy

    • D. 

      1 Thessalonians

    • E. 

      Galatians

  • 4. 
    This book survey's man's predicament, alienated from God and enslaved to imperfection, and argues that Jews and Gentiles suffer equally from the results of Adam's original disobedience and its result, death. The Torah, although holy and just, serves only to increase the awareness of our inadequacy by condemning the universal failure to keep its standards. 
    • A. 

      Hebrews

    • B. 

      Philemon

    • C. 

      2 Peter

    • D. 

      Romans

    • E. 

      Jude

  • 5. 
    This book is a reinterpretation of Paul's eschatology, asserting that a number of traditional apocalyptic signs  must precede the eschation. The present is linked to the coming revelation because evil forces are at work, gathering strength until an unnamed "restrainer" disappears, allowing the wicked personage to emerge in power.
    • A. 

      Revelations

    • B. 

      Jude

    • C. 

      2 Thessalonians

    • D. 

      1 Peter

    • E. 

      Colossians

  • 6. 
    This book warns of impending judgment on false teachers who challenge orthodox doctrine and intends to persuade its recipients to join in total rejection of the persons who offer a different Christianity than that which the apostles propagated. It is also notable for its citation of extra-biblical sources such as the books of Enoch. The lyric doxology at the end balances its fairly strident tone.
    • A. 

      Jude

    • B. 

      2 Peter

    • C. 

      Titus

    • D. 

      1 Corinthians

    • E. 

      Ephesians

  • 7. 
    Often compared to a baptism sermon, this book reminds Christians of their unique privileges and ethical responsibilities. It addresses an audience who had not known Jesus and emphasizes the value of faith transmitted to them. Present trials are to be regarded as opportunities to display the depth of their commitment and the quality of their love. It also identifies Christians as a royal priesthood and advises peaceful submission to the constituted authority.
    • A. 

      Titus

    • B. 

      1 Peter

    • C. 

      2 Peter

    • D. 

      1 Thessalonians

    • E. 

      James

  • 8. 
    Paul's earliest surviving letter written from Corinth about 50 CE to a church that Paul, Timothy, and Silas. The urgent expectation of Christ's return is clear along with the emphasis on the resurrection of the dead. The Greek converts are given the basics of Christianity and Christians are exhorted to hold firmly to their new faith and live morals lives because Jesus will return to judge all humanity.
    • A. 

      1 Thessalonians

    • B. 

      Ephesians

    • C. 

      James

    • D. 

      1 Peter

    • E. 

      Galatians

  • 9. 
    This book urges the readers to overcome their serious divisions, abandon competitive behaviors, and strive for unity of belief and purpose. Topics include differences between Christian ethics and responsibilities, proper conduct at Communion, appreciating gifts and differences, and the affirmation of the resurrection of the dead.
    • A. 

      1 Timothy

    • B. 

      Romans

    • C. 

      Hebrews

    • D. 

      1 Corinthians

    • E. 

      Colssians

  • 10. 
    This book emphasizes Jesus' identity with the cosmic power and wisdom by for which the universe was created. The divine secret is revealed as Christ's spirit dwelling in the believer and the instruction of this book confronted a cult within the church which blended pagan and marginal Jewish speculations about angels and "elemental spirits of the universe" to which the accorded some form of worship. This letter argues for the unique and preeminent nature as the only channel to spiritual reality; lesser spirits are his "captives."
    • A. 

      Galatians

    • B. 

      Ephesians

    • C. 

      Colossians

    • D. 

      2 Peter

    • E. 

      Romans

  • 11. 
    This book argues that the unity of Christ and the cosmos must be reflected in the unity of the church, whose members are at war with supernatural evil which opposes the ultimate unity which will be achieved through Christ. Although the human race had become alienated from God, God's redemptive act in Jesus' death and resurrection has reconciled the believing world to Himself. The age old secret secret plan to join Jews and Gentiles in Christ as part of the same body and inheritance is made clear.
    • A. 

      1 Corinthians

    • B. 

      2 Thessalonians

    • C. 

      2 John

    • D. 

      3 John

    • E. 

      Ephesians

  • 12. 
    An appeal to show hospitality to an itinerant teacher, this book asks its recipient to extended a welcome to missionaries.  Disunity is not a sign of the love that Christian brethren are to practice toward one another.
    • A. 

      3 John

    • B. 

      2 Corinthians

    • C. 

      1 Peter

    • D. 

      2 Timothy

    • E. 

      1 Thessalonians