Ncdj Terminology Quiz

10 Questions | Total Attempts: 945

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Terminology Quizzes & Trivia

Take this quiz to find out the right - and wrong - ways to write and talk about disability issues.


Questions and Answers
  • 1. 
    What constitutes a "developmental disability"?
    • A. 

      A disability that develops slowly over time.

    • B. 

      A disability one is born with.

    • C. 

      A mental and/or physical impairment that manifests before age 22 and limits functionality in areas such as learning, language and mobility.

    • D. 

      A mental impairment that affects a person’s day-to-day life.

    • E. 

      A physical impairment that affects a person's day-to-day life.

  • 2. 
    When describing an individual in a story, when is it appropriate to reference a disability?
    • A. 

      Don't reference a disability unless it is clearly pertinent to the story.

    • B. 

      It’s appropriate to mention a disability in a story only if the individual you are writing about brings it up.

    • C. 

      It’s never appropriate to reference a disability.

    • D. 

      Only reference a disability if it is clearly pertinent to the story and then refer to the person first and the disability second.

    • E. 

      Only reference a disability when the subject of your story agrees that it is OK.

  • 3. 
    What is the appropriate way to describe a person who has a disability such as muscular dystrophy?
    • A. 

      “He battles muscular dystrophy.”

    • B. 

      “He is afflicted with muscular dystrophy.”

    • C. 

      “He is stricken with muscular dystrophy.”

    • D. 

      “He has muscular dystrophy.”

    • E. 

      “He suffers from muscular dystrophy.”

  • 4. 
    When is it appropriate to use the words handicap or handicapped in a story?
    • A. 

      Ask the person you are interviewing what he or she prefers.

    • B. 

      Never use the words handicap or handicapped in a story.

    • C. 

      These terms are appropriate in most uses.

    • D. 

      Use these terms only when applied to a person.

    • E. 

      Use these terms when describing a place or thing (handicapped parking), but not when describing a person (handicapped person).

  • 5. 
    Is it accurate to say that people who are comatose are in a "vegetative state"?
    • A. 

      It’s better to use precise medical terminology when possible or a more general phrase, such as “non-responsive.”

    • B. 

      Yes, and it’s also appropriate to refer to the person as a “vegetable.”

    • C. 

      Use the phrase only if the doctor uses it.

    • D. 

      Use the phrase only if the patient’s family uses it.

    • E. 

      Never use this phrase.

  • 6. 
    What does it mean when a person is said to have a "congenital disability"?
    • A. 

      The disability developed after birth.

    • B. 

      The disability is undiagnosed.

    • C. 

      The person has a disability but doesn’t realize it.

    • D. 

      The person has difficulty with cognitive reasoning.

    • E. 

      The person has had the disability since birth.

  • 7. 
    Which of the following sentences correctly refers to the genetic, chromosomal disorder named after Dr. J. Langdon Down?
    • A. 

      “He has Down disease.”

    • B. 

      “He has Down syndrome.”

    • C. 

      “He has Down’s.”

    • D. 

      “He is a Down Syndrome child.”

    • E. 

      “He is a Down’s child.”

  • 8. 
    Which is the preferred term: Dwarf, little person, midget or someone of short stature?
    • A. 

      Dwarf

    • B. 

      Little Person

    • C. 

      Midget

    • D. 

      Someone of short stature

    • E. 

      It depends. Ask your subject what he or she prefers.

  • 9. 
    What is the best way to describe someone who uses a wheelchair?
    • A. 

      Confined to a wheelchair

    • B. 

      Forced to rely on a wheelchair

    • C. 

      Handicapped

    • D. 

      Person who uses a wheelchair or wheelchair user

    • E. 

      Wheelchair bound

  • 10. 
    Is it appropriate to describe an individual as being blind?
    • A. 

      It’s usually better to say “visually impaired” but ask the individual what he or she prefers.

    • B. 

      Never call someone blind because it has negative connotations.

    • C. 

      The term is appropriate if it’s used by a medical doctor.

    • D. 

      The term is never appropriate.

    • E. 

      You may describe anyone with limited sight as being blind.