Negotiating Chapter 3 Quiz

5 Questions | Total Attempts: 12

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Writing Quizzes & Trivia

This test is to test how well you learned the key concepts taught in Module 3. The quiz, as always, is only for your own benefit. Answering the quiz questions will ensure you learned what was most important in the module, and also prepare you for the certification test at the course conclusion.


Questions and Answers
  • 1. 
    What are the three most common feelings negotiators report having after concluding a negotiation?
    • A. 

      Mad, Angry, and Frustrated

    • B. 

      Confused, Distant, Melancholy

    • C. 

      Good, Relieved, Satisfied

    • D. 

      Tired, Hungry, Baffled

  • 2. 
    We often feel good, relieved, and satisfied at the conclusion of a negotiation because we are happy to get the negotiation over with, and because we simply aren't aware of how much value we left on the table.
    • A. 

      True

    • B. 

      False

  • 3. 
    The "Big Secret" is...
    • A. 

      We routinely leave a great deal of value on the table in our negotiations without ever even realizing it.

    • B. 

      We routinely get distracted in our negotiations by the smell of popcorn.

    • C. 

      We routinely give the other party reasons to share information with us.

  • 4. 
    Because we routinely leave a great deal of value on the table in our negotiations without ever even realizing it, and because we tend to repeat this process over and over again, it's one good reason why many of us never get the wiser as negotiators, and fail to ever really improve as negotiators.
    • A. 

      True

    • B. 

      False

  • 5. 
    Now that the "Big Secret" is out, and we realize that we are unknowingly leaving a great deal of value on the table routinely, without ever really having realized it, now we can begin focusing on what it takes to both create and capture more value in our negotiations and to maximize our negotiated outcomes!
    • A. 

      True

    • B. 

      False