Culture Analysis

12 Questions

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Culture Quizzes & Trivia

Each multiple choice option represents an aspect of a different type of school culture. Read through each statement and then select the one that BEST represents your school. Remember to be honest and remove personal bias from your selection. Adapted from School Culture Rewired (Gruenert & Whitaker, 2015).


Questions and Answers
  • 1. 
    Student Achievement
    • A. 

      Most teacher discussions related to student achievement are restricted to within departments, cliques, or close friends.

    • B. 

      Teachers are given time to discuss student achievement and spend this time critically analyzing one another’s practice.

    • C. 

      Teachers usually do not discuss issues related to student achievement.

    • D. 

      Many teachers believe that if students fail it is the students’ fault.

    • E. 

      Teachers are given time to discuss student achievement but spend most of this time giving one another advice.

    • F. 

      Teachers are given time to discuss student achievement and are expected to use it for that purpose.

  • 2. 
    Collegial Awareness
    • A. 

      Most of the teachers are unaware of what other teachers are teaching.

    • B. 

      Most teachers are aware of only what their friends in the school are teaching.

    • C. 

      Teachers occasionally observe and discuss what their colleagues are teaching.

    • D. 

      Many teachers do not care about the effectiveness of other teachers.

    • E. 

      Teachers seek out opportunities to observe and discuss what other teachers are teaching.

    • F. 

      School leaders expect teachers to know what their colleagues are teaching.

  • 3. 
    Shared Values
    • A. 

      School leaders provide teachers with a list of school values.

    • B. 

      Values that many teachers share don’t fit with students’ needs.

    • C. 

      There is not much agreement among teachers concerning educational values.

    • D. 

      There are small groups of teachers who share educational values.

    • E. 

      Teachers generally agree on educational values.

    • F. 

      Teachers strongly agree on educational values.

  • 4. 
    Decision Making
    • A. 

      Teachers occasionally show an interest in decisions made concerning students.

    • B. 

      Teachers are usually not interested in participating in decisions that concern students.

    • C. 

      School leaders expect teachers to participate in all decisions concerning students.

    • D. 

      Teachers are expected to participate in decisions concerning students.

    • E. 

      There are small groups of teachers who attempt to control all decisions concerning students.

    • F. 

      Decisions are easily made because many teachers don’t care what happens.

  • 5. 
    Risk Taking
    • A. 

      Teachers are constantly looking for new ideas.

    • B. 

      School leaders mandate that teachers try new ideas.

    • C. 

      Teachers occasionally like to experiment with new ideas.

    • D. 

      Innovations are usually initiated within a single grade or department.

    • E. 

      Many teachers protect their teaching styles from “innovation”.

    • F. 

      Most teachers typically do not experiment with new ideas.

  • 6. 
    Trust
    • A. 

      Trust among teachers is not considered necessary.

    • B. 

      Trust among teachers is assumed and not a critical issue.

    • C. 

      There are teachers who only trust certain colleagues.

    • D. 

      There is strong interdependence among teachers.

    • E. 

      Teachers are placed in situations where they are required to trust each other.

    • F. 

      Teachers talk behind their colleagues’ backs.

  • 7. 
    Openness
    • A. 

      Teachers who are committed to students and to learning are subject to criticism.

    • B. 

      Teachers usually keep their opinions about instruction among their friends.

    • C. 

      Teachers usually are not interested in suggestions concerning instruction made by other teachers.

    • D. 

      Teachers are occasionally open to giving or receiving advice concerning instruction.

    • E. 

      Teachers are expected to contribute to discussions about effective teaching at meetings.

    • F. 

      Teachers are very interested in their colleagues’ opinions concerning instruction.

  • 8. 
    Parent Relations
    • A. 

      School leaders require teachers to be in contact with parents regularly.

    • B. 

      Teachers would rather not have parents’ input regarding instructional practice.

    • C. 

      Teachers aggressively seek the involvement of parents in classroom instruction.

    • D. 

      Many teachers avoid parents whenever possible.

    • E. 

      There are cliques of teachers that parents perceive as superior to others.

    • F. 

      Most teachers are comfortable when parents want to be involved in instructional practices.

  • 9. 
    Leadership
    • A. 

      School leaders are seen as obstacles to growth and development.

    • B. 

      School leaders monitor teacher collaboration.

    • C. 

      School leaders encourage teachers to give each other advice without being too critical.

    • D. 

      School leaders challenge ineffective teaching and encourage teachers to do the same.

    • E. 

      School leaders are not very visible in the school.

    • F. 

      School leaders frequently visit or praise the same teachers.

  • 10. 
    Communication
    • A. 

      It is difficult to have productive dialogue with certain groups of teachers.

    • B. 

      Any teacher can talk to any other teacher about teaching practice.

    • C. 

      School policies seem to inhibit teachers’ abilities to discuss student achievement.

    • D. 

      Communication is dominated by top-down mandates.

    • E. 

      Communication among teachers is not considered important.

    • F. 

      Warm and fuzzy conversations permeate the school.

  • 11. 
    Socialization
    • A. 

      New teachers are encouraged to share their experiences with other faculty members.

    • B. 

      New teachers are informally labeled, then typecast as belonging to certain teacher cliques.

    • C. 

      New teachers are quickly indoctrinated by negative staff members.

    • D. 

      All teachers assume some responsibility for helping new teachers adjust.

    • E. 

      There are many mandatory meetings for new teachers to attend.

    • F. 

      Teachers quickly learn that the school has an “every man for himself” culture.

  • 12. 
    Organization History
    • A. 

      There is an understanding that school improvement is a continuous issue.

    • B. 

      “Teachers asking for help” has traditionally been considered a professional weakness.

    • C. 

      The school is known for its constant celebrations.

    • D. 

      School leaders have established strong control over much of what goes on at school.

    • E. 

      Teachers are quick to share negative stories about the school.

    • F. 

      Some grades, departments, or teams consider their successes as separate from the whole school.