Fusionmeet Cross -cultural Competency Part 2

10 Questions
Fusionmeet Cross -cultural Competency Part 2

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Questions and Answers
  • 1. 
    How diverse is your social circle?  Do you have social relationships with people from different religions, cultures, ethnicities and/or sexual orientations?
    • A. 

      No, I don't. I prefer to socialize with people I can relate to.

    • B. 

      Sort of. I talk to people from different backgrounds in school-related situations, but I usually find it difficult to become good friends with them.

    • C. 

      I have one or two friends from different backgrounds. I don’t go out of my way to make friends with people who have different perspectives or beliefs.

    • D. 

      Yes, my social circle reflects the diversity around me. I think a diverse group of friends can really enrich your life.

  • 2. 
    Are you curious about international issues?
    • A. 

      Not really. I generally just pay attention to local news.

    • B. 

      Sort of. I follow major international news stories that are reported on national stations.

    • C. 

      Yes, I seek out any international news stories reported through sources in my home country. (US sources: New York Times, Wall Street Journal, BBC-America, The Daily Beast; Canadian sources: The Globe and Mail, CBC, National Post, Le Devoir.)

    • D. 

      Yes, I follow the media and regularly consult Websites or publications from outside North America. (International sources: BBC World, The Economist, The Guardian Weekly, Al Jazeera, etc.)

  • 3. 
    Are you an adventurous eater? What would you do if a foreign student prepared you an elaborate, spicy meal with ingredients you’d never even heard of?
    • A. 

      I would eat it, of course! If you don’t try new things, you’ll never know if you like them. Whether I liked it or not I’d be sure to ask about the ingredients and other food customs from the student’s home country.

    • B. 

      I’d be uneasy, but would try a few bites in order not to hurt her feelings. I’m sure I wouldn’t really like it.

    • C. 

      I would eat what the student made. Even if I didn’t like it, I would try to think of it as a learning experience!

    • D. 

      Yikes! I’d probably thank them but wouldn’t try it. I don’t like eating strange foods.

  • 4. 
    Could you share living space with an international student or host family abroad? How would you adjust to living with an international student or local family while abroad?
    • A. 

      I think I'd be good at compromising. It might even be interesting to see how other cultures do things at home.

    • B. 

      I don't think I would deal with it particularly well. My personal space is very important to me.

    • C. 

      I'd love to live with someone from another background. What better way to learn about the intricacies of their culture and understand, for example, how others define the concepts of personal space?

    • D. 

      It would be fine as long as we had some rules in place about personal space, kitchen usage and other parts of home life.

  • 5. 
    What experience do you have of living abroad? Have you been abroad to volunteer, intern, study, work or for cross-cultural travel?
    • A. 

      No, I have done none of the above.

    • B. 

      Yes. I have spent time in another country for more than three months.

    • C. 

      No, but I am considering going abroad to volunteer, intern, study, work or travel.

    • D. 

      Yes. I have spent time in another country for up to three months.

  • 6. 
    Can you travel independently? How would you deal with traveling alone in a foreign country?
    • A. 

      I’d be very anxious, especially if I didn’t speak the language. I’d rather stay home than go alone.

    • B. 

      Traveling alone is the best way to experience a foreign culture. I’d be confident and open to any unexpected opportunity that presented itself.

    • C. 

      I might find some parts of it challenging, but I think I could rise to the occasion if I pushed myself.

    • D. 

      I would be nervous. I’d want to plan all the details of my journey before leaving and would try to make sure local people show me around.

  • 7. 
    Can you travel in a way that is “street smart?” f you were traveling alone in a foreign city, and weren’t sure which areas were safe, what would you do?
    • A. 

      I’d talk to local people about safety before exploring the town. I’d try to make my dress and body language blend in to avoid drawing attention to myself and hire a guide if necessary.

    • B. 

      I would consult my guidebook to see if there were any areas to avoid and I’d steer clear of those areas. If I got lost, I’d approach local merchants for directions.

    • C. 

      I would go wherever I wanted, but I’d make sure I always knew my location and had a sense of my surroundings.

    • D. 

      I’d probably just go wherever I wanted, no matter the time of day. Worrying about safety would ruin my trip.

  • 8. 
    Do you consider yourself to be self-aware?  If you were traveling in a foreign country where you got the impression that everyone was staring at you, what would you do?
    • A. 

      I would ask a local person to help me behave appropriately, and I’d have to accept that I might get attention simply because I’m a foreigner.

    • B. 

      I would look to see what other people were doing and try to see whether I was in some way drawing attention to myself.

    • C. 

      I would leave the area fairly quickly. I don’t like being looked at.

    • D. 

      I would get angry and make it clear that I didn’t want to be looked at. Tourists should be allowed to go where they like without people making them feel uncomfortable.

  • 9. 
    Are you resourceful in frustrating circumstances? Imagine that you have twice submitted paperwork requesting an extension on your visa while interning abroad; now the government official says that you have to return with yet another document. What do you do?
    • A. 

      I would storm out of the office. My time is too valuable to waste on bureaucratic procedures. I skip getting the visa extension and prepare to take my chances without it.

    • B. 

      I would comment on how inefficient the place was and ask to speak to a supervisor.

    • C. 

      My body language might show my disappointment, but I would comply with the request.

    • D. 

      I would ask the official to write down what was needed and ask whether I could bring my documentation back to him directly. A personal touch might make the process run more smoothly!

  • 10. 
    Would you be respectful of other cultures’ traditions abroad? How would you feel in a country where you had to be very conscious of your clothing, gestures, etc.? (For example, in a country where traditional, modest dress was the custom.
    • A. 

      I would feel anxious. I’d only change how I dress and behave if I was forced to.

    • B. 

      I would feel a little uncomfortable, but I could tolerate it, especially if it was only for a short period.

    • C. 

      I might not feel like myself in the beginning, but I’d be aware that showing respect would help me become integrated into my host culture.

    • D. 

      I understand the importance of being respectful and culturally sensitive about my appearance and gestures. I’d learn how to recognize my host country’s cultural cues as quickly as I could and enjoy adapting to them as necessary.