Hum 180 Vocab Quiz 3

14 Questions | Total Attempts: 14

SettingsSettingsSettings
Please wait...
Hum 180 Vocab Quiz 3

.


Questions and Answers
  • 1. 
    Common schools
    • A. 

      the educational process that destroys a student's culture and replaces it with a new culture. Deculturalization was the goal of boarding schools that removed American Indian students from their homes at early ages with the goal of turning them toward Christianity and the Anglo Saxon culture.

    • B. 

      Eighteenth-century schools that mixed students from different socioeconomic ic levels in the same classes using the same curricula.

    • C. 

      Laws and practices that segregated whites from blacks in the use of facilities such as water fountains, restrooms, hotels, buses, restaurants, and movie theaters.

    • D. 

      Action such as segregated residential areas that is brought about through laws and the actions of state and local officials.

  • 2. 
    Charity schools
    • A. 

       Laws and practices that segregated whites from blacks in the use of facilities such as water fountains, restrooms, hotels, buses, restaurants, and movie theaters.

    • B. 

      The process of learning one's cultural expectations for behavior, communications, and ways of knowing.

    • C. 

       the educational process that destroys a student's culture and replaces it with a new culture. this was the goal of boarding schools that removed American Indian students from their homes at early ages with the goal of turning them toward Christianity and the Anglo Saxon culture.

    • D. 

      Schools established for poor children in urban areas prior to the common school.

  • 3. 
    Compulsory attendance
    • A. 

       a social construct based on cultural membership that is political based on differences in power (this concept needs a little more elaboration than an abstract definition can provide. Here is an extended quotation from the text itself: "Borders are sometimes drawn in schools around speaking one's native language or dialect in school or around wearing certain clothes such as a hijab as required for religious reasons. Cultural borders are established in classrooms when teachers ground all activity and communications in their culture alone. Being able to function comfortably in different cultures allows educators to cross cultural borders, incorporating the students' cultures and experiences into the curriculum and classroom activities. It also allows teachers to model respect for cultural differences and the cultural borders some students must cross on a daily basis"

    • B. 

      Required attendance at school from age and to an age set by state legislatures. it is not an attendance grade or a school rule but a law enacted by a state legislative body

    • C. 

      The voluntary segregation or isolation of racial, ethnic, or socioeconomic groups in a community, leading to neighborhood schools attended by students from one group.

    • D. 

      Judging other cultural groups through the lens of members of that culture rather than applying the standards of one's own culture.

  • 4. 
    Cultural borders
    • A. 

      Students from different ethnic, racial, and socioeconomic groups attend the same schools and participate in the same classes and activities within the school.

    • B. 

      A form of management that requires submission to the strict rule of a teacher or another person (as opposed to certain schools of 19th-century pedagogical theory that emphasized "children's learning  through their own play, songs, stories, and activities", the methodology of German educator Friedrich Froebel who established the first kindergarten in 1837).

    • C. 

      A social construct based on cultural membership that is political based on differences in power. established in classrooms when teachers ground all activity and communications in their culture alone. Being able to function comfortably in different cultures allows educators to cross cultural borders, incorporating the students' cultures and experiences into the curriculum and classroom activities. It also allows teachers to model respect for cultural differences and the cultural borders some students must cross on a daily basis

    • D. 

      Action such as segregated residential areas that is brought about through laws and the actions of state and local officials.

  • 5. 
    Cultural relativism
    • A. 

      Eighteenth-century schools that mixed students from different socioeconomic ic levels in the same classes using the same curricula.

    • B. 

      The educational process that destroys a student's culture and replaces it with a new culture. Deculturalization was the goal of boarding schools that removed American Indian students from their homes at early ages with the goal of turning them toward Christianity and the Anglo Saxon culture.

    • C. 

      The rights of personal liberty guaranteed by the 13th and 14th amendments to the U.S. Constitution and by acts of Congress. The 13th amending abolished slavery and the 14th amendment regarded the civil rights of citizenship.

    • D. 

      Judging other cultural groups through the lens of members of that culture rather than applying the standards of one's own culture.

  • 6. 
    Enculturation
    • A. 

      Students from different ethnic, racial, and socioeconomic groups attend the same schools and participate in the same classes and activities within the school.

    • B. 

      The educational process that destroys a student's culture and replaces it with a new culture. it was the goal of boarding schools that removed American Indian students from their homes at early ages with the goal of turning them toward Christianity and the Anglo Saxon culture.

    • C. 

       the process of learning one's cultural expectations for behavior, communications, and ways of knowing.

    • D. 

      Laws and practices that segregated whites from blacks in the use of facilities such as water fountains, restrooms, hotels, buses, restaurants, and movie theaters.

  • 7. 
    Authoritarian
    • A. 

       Laws and practices that segregated whites from blacks in the use of facilities such as water fountains, restrooms, hotels, buses, restaurants, and movie theaters.

    • B. 

      Action such as segregated residential areas that is brought about through laws and the actions of state and local officials.

    • C. 

      The constitutional amendment ratified during the Reconstruction era (the period of recovery following the Civil War, approximately 1863-1877) on July 9, 1868, to provide citizenship to all persons born or naturalized in the United States other than American Indians and Asians. It also reaffirmed and extended the civil rights act passed in 1866 and served as the foundation for Brown v. Board of Education of Topeka and other civil rights cases in the 20th and 21st century.

    • D. 

      A form of management that requires submission to the strict rule of a teacher or another person (as opposed to certain schools of 19th-century pedagogical theory that emphasized "children's learning  through their own play, songs, stories, and activities" (189), the methodology of German educator Friedrich Froebel who established the first kindergarten in 1837).

  • 8. 
    Deculturalization
    • A. 

      Required attendance at school from age and to an age set by state legislatures (note: this is not an attendance grade or a school rule but a LAW enacted by a state legislative body).

    • B. 

       judging other cultural groups through the lens of members of that culture rather than applying the standards of one's own culture.

    • C. 

      The educational process that destroys a student's culture and replaces it with a new culture. it was the goal of boarding schools that removed American Indian students from their homes at early ages with the goal of turning them toward Christianity and the Anglo Saxon culture.

    • D. 

      The voluntary segregation or isolation of racial, ethnic, or socioeconomic groups in a community, leading to neighborhood schools attended by students from one group.

  • 9. 
    Integration
    • A. 

      A form of management that requires submission to the strict rule of a teacher or another person (as opposed to certain schools of 19th-century pedagogical theory that emphasized "children's learning  through their own play, songs, stories, and activities" (189), the methodology of German educator Friedrich Froebel who established the first kindergarten in 1837).

    • B. 

       Laws and practices that segregated whites from blacks in the use of facilities such as water fountains, restrooms, hotels, buses, restaurants, and movie theaters.

    • C. 

       students from different ethnic, racial, and socioeconomic groups attend the same schools and participate in the same classes and activities within the school.

    • D. 

      The rights of personal liberty guaranteed by the 13th and 14th amendments to the U.S. Constitution and by acts of Congress. The 13th amending abolished slavery and the 14th amendment regarded the civil rights of citizenship.

  • 10. 
    Fourteenth Amendment
    • A. 

      Laws and practices that segregated whites from blacks in the use of facilities such as water fountains, restrooms, hotels, buses, restaurants, and movie theaters.

    • B. 

      A form of management that requires submission to the strict rule of a teacher or another person (as opposed to certain schools of 19th-century pedagogical theory that emphasized "children's learning  through their own play, songs, stories, and activities" (189), the methodology of German educator Friedrich Froebel who established the first kindergarten in 1837).

    • C. 

      The rights of personal liberty guaranteed by the 13th and 14th amendments to the U.S. Constitution and by acts of Congress. The 13th amending abolished slavery and the 14th amendment regarded the civil rights of citizenship.

    • D. 

      The constitutional amendment ratified during the Reconstruction era (the period of recovery following the Civil War, approximately 1863-1877) on July 9, 1868, to provide citizenship to all persons born or naturalized in the United States other than American Indians and Asians. It also reaffirmed and extended the civil rights act passed in 1866 and served as the foundation for Brown v. Board of Education of Topeka and other civil rights cases in the 20th and 21st century.

  • 11. 
    Jim crow laws 
    • A. 

       the voluntary segregation or isolation of racial, ethnic, or socioeconomic groups in a community, leading to neighborhood schools attended by students from one group.

    • B. 

      The process of learning one's cultural expectations for behavior, communications, and ways of knowing.

    • C. 

      Laws and practices that segregated whites from blacks in the use of facilities such as water fountains, restrooms, hotels, buses, restaurants, and movie theaters.

    • D. 

      Judging other cultural groups through the lens of members of that culture rather than applying the standards of one's own culture.

  • 12. 
    De facto segregation 
    • A. 

      The voluntary segregation or isolation of racial, ethnic, or socioeconomic groups in a community, leading to neighborhood schools attended by students from one group.

    • B. 

      The process of learning one's cultural expectations for behavior, communications, and ways of knowing.

    • C. 

      Required attendance at school from age and to an age set by state legislatures (note: this is not an attendance grade or a school rule but a LAW enacted by a state legislative body).

    • D. 

      Action such as segregated residential areas that is brought about through laws and the actions of state and local officials.

  • 13. 
    De jure segregation
    • A. 

      The rights of personal liberty guaranteed by the 13th and 14th amendments to the U.S. Constitution and by acts of Congress. The 13th amending abolished slavery and the 14th amendment regarded the civil rights of citizenship.

    • B. 

      Action such as segregated residential areas that is brought about through laws and the actions of state and local officials.

    • C. 

      Judging other cultural groups through the lens of members of that culture rather than applying the standards of one's own culture.

    • D. 

       the voluntary segregation or isolation of racial, ethnic, or socioeconomic groups in a community, leading to neighborhood schools attended by students from one group.

  • 14. 
    Civil rights
    • A. 

      A form of management that requires submission to the strict rule of a teacher or another person (as opposed to certain schools of 19th-century pedagogical theory that emphasized "children's learning  through their own play, songs, stories, and activities" (189), the methodology of German educator Friedrich Froebel who established the first kindergarten in 1837).

    • B. 

      The rights of personal liberty guaranteed by the 13th and 14th amendments to the U.S. Constitution and by acts of Congress. The 13th amending abolished slavery and the 14th amendment regarded the civil rights of citizenship.

    • C. 

      The constitutional amendment ratified during the Reconstruction era (the period of recovery following the Civil War, approximately 1863-1877) on July 9, 1868, to provide citizenship to all persons born or naturalized in the United States other than American Indians and Asians. It also reaffirmed and extended the civil rights act passed in 1866 and served as the foundation for Brown v. Board of Education of Topeka and other civil rights cases in the 20th and 21st century.

    • D. 

      Required attendance at school from age and to an age set by state legislatures (note: this is not an attendance grade or a school rule but a LAW enacted by a state legislative body).

Back to Top Back to top