Mr. Guiney's Weekly History Bowl Prep - Week 2, 10-question Quiz On European History Pack

10 Questions

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Mr. Guiney

Hi History Bowl Squad!Have you been learning your European history pack of questions? Try these 10 questions and see how you get on!Remember to come to D204 next week to collect the third week's pack, African History. Good luck and keep having fun. But he more you learn the more you'll enjoy the tournament!Ps If you score 10/10 please see me (with evidence) for 2 x Housepoints. Mr. Guiney


Questions and Answers
  • 1. 
    This was a powerful city-state that emerged thanks to the seagoing development of the port of Piraeus. It dominates the Attica region and is one of the world’s oldest cities with a recorded history spanning 3,400 years. Widely referred to as the cradle of Western civilisation and the birthplace of democracy it is famous mostly for its political and cultural life. It is home to two UNESCO World Heritage sites, the Acropolis and the medieval Daphni Monastery and the most famous of all its landmarks is the Parthenon. For the points name this capital and largest city of Ancient Greece.
    • A. 

      Athens

    • B. 

      Sparta

    • C. 

      Corsica

    • D. 

      Corfu

  • 2. 
    He was once described by Suetonius as "unusually handsome and exceedingly graceful at all periods of his life." He was the founder of the Roman Principate and considered the first Roman Emperor, controlling the Roman Empire from 27BC until his death in AD14. He was born Gaius Octavius into an old and wealthy family. He, Marc Anthony, and Marcus Lepidus formed the second triumvirate to defeat the assassins of Caesar, which was eventually torn apart by the competing ambitions of its members. He rejected monarchical titles and died in 14AD at the age of 75. He is typically referred to as Octavius. For the points name this Roman Emperor and heir to Caesar who was succeeded by his adopted son Tiberius. 
    • A. 

      Marcus Aurelius

    • B. 

      Augustus

    • C. 

      Caesar

    • D. 

      Frankie Howerd

  • 3. 
    He was native speaker of Latin born in modern day Serbia. He ruled for 38 years and revived his Empire’s greatness to reconquer the lost western half of the historical Roman Empire. He married Theodora and has sometimes been called the “last Roman”. This man is famous for the uniform writing of Roman Law which is still the basis of civil law in many modern states and he built masterpieces such as the church of Hagia Sophia. A devastating plague in the early 540s marked an end of an age of this man’s splendour. Traditionally known as ‘the Great’ name this man who is also a saint and who was Emperor of the Byzantine Empire from 527 to 565.
    • A. 

      Julian I

    • B. 

      Josephine I

    • C. 

      Joliet I

    • D. 

      Justinian I

  • 4. 
    Incredibly, the model Cindy Crawford can trace her lineage back to this lover of books who married at least four times and who had three legitimate sons of whom only Louis the Pious survived to succeed him. He did not like drunkenness but was fond of food and his favourite item was roasted meat. This man was said to be seven times the height of his feet, with white hair, and towards the end he dragged one leg. He has been called the "Father of Europe" and ruled for 13 years from his imperial capital of Aachen in modern day Germany. His empire covered most of modern western Europe and he launched attacks on the Moors. He was the oldest son of Pepin the Short and Bertrada of Laon and became King in 768 after the death of his father, going on to control Europe three centuries after the decline of the Romans. For the points name this King of the Franks, King of the Lombards, and Emperor of the Romans who united much of Europe during the early Middle Ages in what was known as the Carolingian Empire.
    • A. 

      Otto I

    • B. 

      Henry IV

    • C. 

      Charlemage

    • D. 

      Pepin the Short

  • 5. 
    It is 17 feet tall and made of marble which was quarried in northern Tuscany and it weighs more than six tonnes. It shows a nude male with intense eyes representing a Biblical character and was originally commissioned as one of a series of statues for Florence Cathedral but was placed instead in a public square outside the Palazzo Vecchio, the seat of government in Florence. There is a replica of it in London in which the character's nakedness was covered up by a plaster fig leaf, allegedly so as to not shock of offend Queen Victoria. For ten points name this Renaissance Masterpiece sculpture created between 1501 and 1504 by Michelangelo named after the giant-killer who defeated Goliath.
    • A. 

      Derek

    • B. 

      Peter

    • C. 

      David

    • D. 

      Edward

  • 6. 
    Born in 1394 as the third child of the Portuguese King John I he is regarded as the man who began what would be known as the Age of Discoveries. He became fascinated with Africa in general and achieved incredible maritime feats – indeed, he was only 21 when he captured the Moorish port of Ceuta in northern Morocco. Under his guidance a new ship, the caravel, was invented – which was much more manoeuvrable and could sail much nearer the wind. His full real name was Henrique, Duke of Viseu and the nickname by which we now refer to him was never used in his own lifetime. For ten points name this Prince who was an important figure in 15th century Portuguese politics and who changed navigation forever. 
    • A. 

      Henry the Navigator

    • B. 

      Louis the Lookout

    • C. 

      David the Directions

    • D. 

      Thomas the Tank Engine

  • 7. 
    Its opening words are “When our Lord and Master Jesus Christ said repent he willed the entire life of believers to be one of repentance.” In this document a number of complaints were listed about Catholic practices, such as the ability to pay for reduced heavenly punishment, known as an indulgence. Some believe the document was posted on the door of All Saints’ Church and other churches in Wittenberg but what we do know is that they were quickly reprinted, translated and distributed. They were written by Martin Luther, a professor of moral theology at the University of Wittenberg. For ten points name these theses which were also known as Disputation on the Power of Indulgences and which, in 1517, started the Reformation and profoundly changed Europe.
    • A. 

      80 Theses

    • B. 

      85 Theses

    • C. 

      90 Theses

    • D. 

      95 Theses

  • 8. 
    This event formed the framework for European international politics until the outbreak of the First World War in 1914. During this event France lost recent conquests, Prussia, Austria and Russia made gains, and Austria gained Venice and much of northern Italy. The immediate background to it was Napoleon's defeat and surrender in May 1814 which brought to an end 25 years of almost continuous war in Europe. This event's final act was signed nine days before Napoleon's final defeat at Waterloo.  Most of the discussions which took place here were informal face to face discussions among the Great Powers. For the points name this meeting of ambassadors of European states chaired by Austrian statesman Klemens von Metternich and held in Vienna from November 1814 to June 1815 whose objective was to provide a long-term peace plan for Europe by settling issues arising from the French Revolutionary Wars and the Napoleonic Wars. 
    • A. 

      Peace of Augsburg

    • B. 

      Treaty of Versailles

    • C. 

      Congress of Vienna

    • D. 

      Peace of Westphalia

  • 9. 
    They first emerged in 1678 when they opposed the Whig-supported Exclusion Bill which set out to disinherit the heir presumptive James, Duke of York. This party ceased to exist as an organised political unity in the early 1760s although a few decades later a new party would rise to establish a hold on British government between 1783 and 1830, with William Pitt the Younger followed by Robert Jenkinson, 2nd Earl of Liverpool. Under the leadership of Robert Peel, the Tamworth Manifesto was issued, which began to transform them into the Conservative Party. However, Peel lost many of his supporters by repealing the Corn Laws, causing the party to break apart. One faction, led by Benjamin Disraeli, survived to become the modern Conservative Party, whose members are commonly referred to, for ten points, by which name?
    • A. 

      Labour

    • B. 

      Whigs

    • C. 

      Tories

    • D. 

      Lib Dems

  • 10. 
    It was announced through the Declaration of Breda on 4th April 1660. This period followed the interregnum in which Oliver Cromwell and his son Richard acted as Lord Protectors following the execution of King Charles I and the end of the English Civil Wars and a key cause of it was Richard Cromwell's reluctance to support the army and to treat parliament in a similar way to the previous King. It was followed by the Georgian era and Monarchs in this period included Charles II, James II, William III, Mary II, and Anne. During this period Oliver Cromwell's body was dug up, hanged, and beheaded. For the points name this period of British history in which the English monarchy was restored to the throne during the Stuart period when in 1660 Charles II, also known as the Merry Monarch, became King.
    • A. 

      The Interregnum

    • B. 

      The Restoration

    • C. 

      The Reformation

    • D. 

      Coronation