Literary Terms MCQ: Practice Test! Quiz

57 Questions | Total Attempts: 59

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Literary Terms MCQ: Practice Test! Quiz

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Questions and Answers
  • 1. 
    The word, phrase, or clause to which a pronoun refers.    
    • A. 

      Anaphora

    • B. 

      Antecedent

    • C. 

      Asyndenton

    • D. 

      Clause

  • 2. 
    A figure of speech in which opposing or contrasting ideas are balanced against each other using grammatically parallel syntax. 
    • A. 

      Inversion

    • B. 

      Parallelism

    • C. 

      Antithesis

    • D. 

      Polysyndention

  • 3. 
    Grammatical structure in which the first clause or phrase is reversed in the second, sometimes repeating the same words. 
    • A. 

      Inversion

    • B. 

      Parallelism

    • C. 

      Anaphora

    • D. 

      Chiasmus

  • 4. 
    He comic substitution of one word for another similar in sound, but different in meaning. Functions to make characters look ignorant or amusingly uneducated. 
    • A. 

      Local color

    • B. 

      Psudonym

    • C. 

      Malapropism

    • D. 

      Satire

  • 5. 
    any form of literature that blends ironic humor and wit with criticism directed at a particular folly, vice or stupidity. 
    • A. 

      Juxtaposition

    • B. 

      Local color

    • C. 

      Satire

    • D. 

      Unity

  • 6. 
    The reflection in a work of the author’s attitude toward his or her subject.    
    • A. 

      Local color

    • B. 

      Voice

    • C. 

      Wit

    • D. 

      Tone

  • 7. 
    A technique that allows the reader to see the continuous, chaotic flow of half-formed and discontinuous thoughts, memories, sense impressions, random associations, images, feelings and re-flections that constitute a character’s consciousness 
    • A. 

      Unity

    • B. 

      Mood

    • C. 

      Stream of consciousness

    • D. 

      Voice

  • 8. 
    The use of a quotation at the beginning of a work that hints at its theme.    
    • A. 

      Epigraph

    • B. 

      Framed narrative

    • C. 

      Inference

    • D. 

      Jargon

  • 9. 
    Direct denunciation or name-calling.    
    • A. 

      Diction

    • B. 

      Jargon

    • C. 

      Invective

    • D. 

      Epigraph

  • 10. 
    In its broadest sense, the incongruity, or difference, between reality (what is) and appearance (what seems to be). 
    • A. 

      Epigraph

    • B. 

      Flashback

    • C. 

      Inference

    • D. 

      Irony

  • 11. 
    A word, phrase or attitude that has double or even multiple meanings, resulting in multiple interpretations 
    • A. 

      Colloquialism

    • B. 

      Convention

    • C. 

      Diatribe

    • D. 

      Ambiguity

  • 12. 
    Words or phrases that are used in everyday conversation or informal writing which are usually considered inappropriate for a formal essay. 
    • A. 

      Ambiguity

    • B. 

      Atmosphere

    • C. 

      Colloquialism

    • D. 

      Convention

  • 13. 
    The range of further associations that a word or phrase suggests in addition to its straightforward dictionary meaning. 
    • A. 

      Colloquialism

    • B. 

      Denotation

    • C. 

      Connotation

    • D. 

      Diatrube

  • 14. 
    Style of writing that rejects idealized portrayals of life and attempts complete accuracy, disinterested objectivity, and frankness in depicting life as a brutal struggle for survival. 
    • A. 

      Naturalism

    • B. 

      Modernism

    • C. 

      Primitivism

    • D. 

      Realism

  • 15. 
    an international movement in the arts of the early 20th century. rejected old forms and experimented with the new, which often led to controversy. Often on trivial or shocking subject matter – subject matter not traditionally the focus of art. 
    • A. 

      Modernism

    • B. 

      Neo-classicism

    • C. 

      Nihilism

    • D. 

      Romanticism

  • 16. 
    literature depicting emotional matter in an imaginative form. Characteristics include: individuality, subjectivity, spontaneity, freedom from rules, solitary life vs. life in society, the belief that imagination is superior to reason, devotion to beauty, worship of nature, fascination with the past, etc. 
    • A. 

      Modernism

    • B. 

      Naturalism

    • C. 

      Surrealism

    • D. 

      Romanticism

  • 17. 
    philosophy that suggests that virtually all knowledge is the result of our experiences. We are born “blank slates” and this theory discounts any role of nature in human behavior . 
    • A. 

      Empiricism

    • B. 

      Enlightenment

    • C. 

      Expressionism

    • D. 

      Hedomism

  • 18. 
    a philosophical movement that focuses on the individual human being’s experience of, recognition of, and triumph over the meaninglessness of existence. 
    • A. 

      Gothic

    • B. 

      Feminism

    • C. 

      Existentialism

    • D. 

      Metaphysical

  • 19. 
    philosophy that views a human being as an isolated existent who is cast into an alien universe, conceives the universe as possessing no inherent truth, value, or meaning, and represents human life, as it moves from the nothingness whence it came toward the nothingness where it must end, 
    • A. 

      Absurdism

    • B. 

      Aestheticism

    • C. 

      Baroque

    • D. 

      Egoism

  • 20. 
    reverence for beauty; movement that held beautiful form is to be valued more than instructive content. (Art for art’s sake.) 
    • A. 

      Baroque

    • B. 

      Aestheticism

    • C. 

      Classicism

    • D. 

      Determinism

  • 21. 
    An adherence to the principals of Greek and Roman literature.    
    • A. 

      Aestheticism

    • B. 

      Baroque

    • C. 

      Deism

    • D. 

      Classicism

  • 22. 
    Philosophy which draws on Newton's description of the universe as a great clock built by the Creator and then set in motion, the deists among the philosophes argued that everything—physical motion, human physiology, politics, society, economics—had its own set of rational principles established by God which could be understood by human beings solely by means of their reason. 
    • A. 

      Aestheticism

    • B. 

      Baroque

    • C. 

      Classicism

    • D. 

      Deism

  • 23. 
    writing that borders on lecturing. Scholarly, academic, and often overly difficult and distant. 
    • A. 

      Novelette

    • B. 

      Parable

    • C. 

      Pedantic

    • D. 

      Play

  • 24. 
    a novel whose principal character is a low-born rogue who lives by his/her wits and who becomes involved in one predicament after another. 
    • A. 

      Paean

    • B. 

      Parable

    • C. 

      Parody

    • D. 

      Picaresque

  • 25. 
    a type of novel characterized by mystery, horror, and the supernatural, often with haunted castles, secret passageways, grisly visions, and all of the paraphernalia of the tale of terror . 
    • A. 

      Gothic

    • B. 

      Homily

    • C. 

      Memoir

    • D. 

      Mock epic

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