Literary Terms Multiple Choice Test 1

85 Questions | Total Attempts: 611

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Literary Terms Quizzes & Trivia

Multiple choice test that is both challenging and fair.


Questions and Answers
  • 1. 
    Means "advance guard" or "vanguard" and is used to refer to people or works that are experimental or innovative, particularly with respect to art, culture, and politics.
    • A. 

      Anachronism

    • B. 

      Catharsis

    • C. 

      Avant-garde

    • D. 

      Vernacular

  • 2. 
    A repition of sentences using the same structure.
    • A. 

      Adage

    • B. 

      Parallel Structure

    • C. 

      Aphorism

    • D. 

      Pastoral

  • 3. 
    The structure of a story; the sequence in which the author arranges events in a story; the structure of a five-act play often includes the rising action, the climax, the falling action, and the resolution.
    • A. 

      Pathetic Fallacy

    • B. 

      Verisimilitude

    • C. 

      Allusion

    • D. 

      Plot

  • 4. 
    A statement which can contain two or more meanings.
    • A. 

      Ambiguity

    • B. 

      Anecdote

    • C. 

      Epigraph

    • D. 

      Foil

  • 5. 
    The emotional content of a word.
    • A. 

      Connotation

    • B. 

      Figurative Language

    • C. 

      Denotation

    • D. 

      Epic

  • 6. 
    The dictionary definition of a word.
    • A. 

      Conotation

    • B. 

      Figure of Speech

    • C. 

      Denotation

    • D. 

      Epithet

  • 7. 
    A mild word or phrase which substitues for another which would be undesirable because it is too direct, unpleasant, or offensive.
    • A. 

      Euphemism

    • B. 

      Genre

    • C. 

      Point of View

    • D. 

      Picaresque Novel

  • 8. 
    The result of an action is the reverse of what the actor expected.
    • A. 

      Understatement

    • B. 

      Situational Irony

    • C. 

      Postmodernism

    • D. 

      Oxymoron

  • 9. 
    The audience knows something that the characters in the drama do not.
    • A. 

      Adage

    • B. 

      Bildungsroman

    • C. 

      Apostrophe

    • D. 

      Dramatic Irony

  • 10. 
    The contrast is between the literal meaning of what is said and what is meant.
    • A. 

      Verbal Irony

    • B. 

      Analogy

    • C. 

      Paradox

    • D. 

      Juxtaposition

  • 11. 
    The use of angry and insulting language.
    • A. 

      Jargon

    • B. 

      Invective

    • C. 

      Malapropism

    • D. 

      Mood

  • 12. 
    Pervasive irony created by a structural feature such as a naive protagonist whose viewpoint is consistently wrong, shared by neither author nor reader is known as this.
    • A. 

      Metonymy

    • B. 

      Myth

    • C. 

      Structural Irony

    • D. 

      Satire

  • 13. 
    A figure os speech wherein a comparison is made between two unlike quantities without the use of the words "like" or "as."
    • A. 

      Metaphor

    • B. 

      Soliloquy

    • C. 

      Simile

    • D. 

      Analogy

  • 14. 
    The hero or central character of a literary work.
    • A. 

      Genre

    • B. 

      Literary Theory

    • C. 

      Motif

    • D. 

      Protagonist

  • 15. 
    A device in literature where an object represents an idea.
    • A. 

      Narrator

    • B. 

      Parody

    • C. 

      Symbolism

    • D. 

      Theme

  • 16. 
    A statement which lessens or minimizes the importance of what is meant.
    • A. 

      Verisimilitude

    • B. 

      Understatement

    • C. 

      Colloquialism

    • D. 

      Hyperbole

  • 17. 
    Wise saying; proverb; short, memorable saying that expresses a truth nd is handed down from one generation to the next.
    • A. 

      Aphorism

    • B. 

      Analogy

    • C. 

      Adage

    • D. 

      Apostrophe

  • 18. 
    A purification of emotions in literature or art.
    • A. 

      Catharsis

    • B. 

      Colloquialism

    • C. 

      Vernacular

    • D. 

      Foil

  • 19. 
    An author's choice of words.
    • A. 

      Epic

    • B. 

      Diction

    • C. 

      Syntax

    • D. 

      Genre

  • 20. 
    A word or phrase preceding or following a name which serves to describe the character in literature.
    • A. 

      Hamartia

    • B. 

      Hubris

    • C. 

      Epigraph

    • D. 

      Epithet

  • 21. 
    Unintentional use of an inappropriate word similar in sound to the appropriate word, often with humorous effect.
    • A. 

      Naturalism

    • B. 

      Modernism

    • C. 

      Malapropism

    • D. 

      Postmodernism

  • 22. 
    A revolt against the conservative values of realism.
    • A. 

      Naturalism

    • B. 

      Malapropism

    • C. 

      Modernism

    • D. 

      Postmodernism

  • 23. 
    In literature, an extreme form of realism that developed in France in the 19th Century.
    • A. 

      Naturalism

    • B. 

      Malapropism

    • C. 

      Modernism

    • D. 

      Postmodernism

  • 24. 
    A movement away from the viewpoint of modernism. 
    • A. 

      Naturalism

    • B. 

      Malapropism

    • C. 

      Modernism

    • D. 

      Postmodernism

  • 25. 
    A play on words wherein a word is used to convey two meanings at the same time.
    • A. 

      Pun

    • B. 

      Satire

    • C. 

      Hyperbole

    • D. 

      Paradox

  • 26. 
    A literary style in which one's thoughts and feelings are depicted in a continuous and uninterrupted flow.
    • A. 

      Stream of Consciousness

    • B. 

      Southern Gothic

    • C. 

      Sonnet

    • D. 

      Soliloquy

  • 27. 
    Language that is native to people (as opposed to learned language) and is used as everyday speech.
    • A. 

      Jarg

    • B. 

      Verisimilitude

    • C. 

      Figure of Speech

    • D. 

      Vernacular

  • 28. 
    A writer creates unreal characters and situations and asks the reader to pretend that they are real in a fictional work.
    • A. 

      Narrator

    • B. 

      Verisimilitude

    • C. 

      Point of View

    • D. 

      Vernacular

  • 29. 
    A reference in one literary work to a character or theme found in another literary work.
    • A. 

      Analogy

    • B. 

      Apostrophe

    • C. 

      Allusion

    • D. 

      Bildungsroman

  • 30. 
    The method a writer uses to reveal the personality of a character in a literary work.
    • A. 

      Characterization

    • B. 

      Simile

    • C. 

      Metaphor

    • D. 

      Foil

  • 31. 
    Characters that do not change during the course of a story.
    • A. 

      Flat Character

    • B. 

      Round Character

    • C. 

      Static Character

    • D. 

      Dynamic Character

  • 32. 
    Characters wiht only one dominant trait or aspect, such as greed or anger.
    • A. 

      Flat Character

    • B. 

      Round Character

    • C. 

      Static Character

    • D. 

      Dynamic Character

  • 33. 
    Characters that change during the course of a story.
    • A. 

      Flat Character

    • B. 

      Round Character

    • C. 

      Static Character

    • D. 

      Dynamic Character

  • 34. 
    Characters that have many traits or aspects to their personality.
    • A. 

      Flat Character

    • B. 

      Round Character

    • C. 

      Static Character

    • D. 

      Dynamic Character

  • 35. 
    A phrase that is common in everyday, uncoinstrained conversation, rather than in formal speech, academic writing, or paralinguistics.
    • A. 

      Classicism

    • B. 

      Realism

    • C. 

      Anachronism

    • D. 

      Colloquialism

  • 36. 
    Use of historically inaccurate details in a text.
    • A. 

      Classicism

    • B. 

      Realism

    • C. 

      Anachronoism

    • D. 

      Colloquialism

  • 37. 
    A movement that stressed the presentation of life as it is, without embellishment or idealization in literature.
    • A. 

      Classicism

    • B. 

      Realism

    • C. 

      Anachronism

    • D. 

      Colloquialism

  • 38. 
    A movement or tendency in art, music, and literature to retain the characteristics found in work originating in classical Greece and Rome.
    • A. 

      Classicism

    • B. 

      Realism

    • C. 

      Anachronism

    • D. 

      Colloquialism

  • 39. 
    A novel or story whose theme is the moral or psychological growth of the main character.
    • A. 

      Bildungsroman

    • B. 

      Avant-garde

    • C. 

      Literary Theory

    • D. 

      Pathetic Fallacy

  • 40. 
    A brief quotation whcih appears at the beginning of a literary work.
    • A. 

      Epic

    • B. 

      Epigraph

    • C. 

      Euphemism

    • D. 

      Epithet

  • 41. 
    A major work dealing with an important theme, generally in literature.
    • A. 

      Epic

    • B. 

      Epigraph

    • C. 

      Euphemism

    • D. 

      Epithet

  • 42. 
    An overused expression.
    • A. 

      Motif

    • B. 

      Pun

    • C. 

      Oxymoron

    • D. 

      Cliché

  • 43. 
    Greek word for PRIDE, which generally is the root of the tragic flaw of a hero in a tragedy.
    • A. 

      In Medias Res

    • B. 

      Hamartia

    • C. 

      Hubris

    • D. 

      Literary Theory

  • 44. 
    Latin phrase for in the middle of things, meaning that a story begins in the middle of the plot, usually at an exciting part.
    • A. 

      In Medias Res

    • B. 

      Hamartia

    • C. 

      Hubris

    • D. 

      Literary Theory

  • 45. 
    Systematic study of the nature of literature and the methods for analyzing literature.
    • A. 

      In Medias Res

    • B. 

      Hamartia

    • C. 

      Hubris

    • D. 

      Literary Theory

  • 46. 
    Serious character flaw of the main character of a Greek tragedy, whcihc generally this flaw is great pride.
    • A. 

      In Medias Res

    • B. 

      Hamartia

    • C. 

      Hubris

    • D. 

      Literary Theory

  • 47. 
    A moment when a character is alone and speaks his or her thoughs aloud.
    • A. 

      Synechdoche

    • B. 

      Soliloquy

    • C. 

      Myth

    • D. 

      Metonymy

  • 48. 
    A figure os speech in which a word represents something else which it suggests.
    • A. 

      Synecdoche

    • B. 

      Soliloquy

    • C. 

      Myth

    • D. 

      Metonymy

  • 49. 
    A figure of speech wherein a part of something represents the whole thing.
    • A. 

      Synecdoche

    • B. 

      Soliloquy

    • C. 

      Myth

    • D. 

      Metonymy

  • 50. 
    An unverifiable story based on a religious belief.
    • A. 

      Synecdoche

    • B. 

      Soliloquy

    • C. 

      Myth

    • D. 

      Metonymy

  • 51. 
    Expresses the author's attitude toward his or her subject.
    • A. 

      Mood

    • B. 

      Tone

    • C. 

      Theme

    • D. 

      Style

  • 52. 
    The author's use of figurative language, diction, sound effects and other literary devices.
    • A. 

      Mood

    • B. 

      Tone

    • C. 

      Theme

    • D. 

      Style

  • 53. 
    The atmosphere or feeling created by a literary work, partly by a description of the objects or by the style of the descriptions.
    • A. 

      Mood

    • B. 

      Tone

    • C. 

      Theme

    • D. 

      Style

  • 54. 
    An ingredient of a literary work which gives the work unity.
    • A. 

      Mood

    • B. 

      Tone

    • C. 

      Theme

    • D. 

      Style

  • 55. 
    A situation or a statement that seems to contradict itself, but on closer inspection, does not.
    • A. 

      Parody

    • B. 

      Pathetic Fallacy

    • C. 

      Oxymoron

    • D. 

      Paradox

  • 56. 
    A combination of contradictory terms.
    • A. 

      Parody

    • B. 

      Pathetic Fallacy

    • C. 

      Oxymoron

    • D. 

      Paradox

  • 57. 
    A literary device wherein something nonhuman found in nature - a beast, plant, stream, natural force, etc. - performs as though from human feeling or motivation.
    • A. 

      Parody

    • B. 

      Pathetic Fallacy

    • C. 

      Oxymoron

    • D. 

      Paradox

  • 58. 
    A literary work that imitates the style of another literary work.
    • A. 

      Paradox

    • B. 

      Pathetic Fallacy

    • C. 

      Oxymoron

    • D. 

      Parody

  • 59. 
    Fictional genre with a setting in the Southern United States that vests its stories with foreboding and grotesquerie.
    • A. 

      Sonnet

    • B. 

      Southern Gothic

    • C. 

      Picaresque Novel

    • D. 

      Stream of Consciousness

  • 60. 
    An episodic, often autobiographical novel about a rogue or picaro (a person of low social status) wandering around living off his wits.
    • A. 

      Sonnet

    • B. 

      Southern Gothic

    • C. 

      Picaresque Novel

    • D. 

      Stream of Consciousness

  • 61. 
    A lyric poem of fourteen lines whose rhyme scheme is mixed on the meter that is iambic pentameter.
    • A. 

      Sonnet

    • B. 

      Southern Gothic

    • C. 

      Picaresque Novel

    • D. 

      Stream of Consciousness

  • 62. 
    The way words are put together to form phrases, clauses, and sentences.
    • A. 

      Genre

    • B. 

      Syntax

    • C. 

      Symbolism

    • D. 

      Diction

  • 63. 
    A brief statement whcih expresses an observation on life, usually intented as a wise observation.
    • A. 

      Genre

    • B. 

      Aphorism

    • C. 

      Foil

    • D. 

      Analogy

  • 64. 
    Comparison of two things that are alike in some respects.
    • A. 

      Genre

    • B. 

      Aphorism

    • C. 

      Foil

    • D. 

      Analogy

  • 65. 
    A character in a play who sets off the main character or other characters by comparison.
    • A. 

      Genre

    • B. 

      Aphorism

    • C. 

      Foil

    • D. 

      Analogy

  • 66. 
    A literary type or form.
    • A. 

      Genre

    • B. 

      Aphorism

    • C. 

      Foil

    • D. 

      Analogy

  • 67. 
    A way of saying one thing and meaning something else in literature.
    • A. 

      Apostrophe

    • B. 

      Figure of Speech

    • C. 

      Figurative Language

    • D. 

      Anecdote

  • 68. 
    A very short tale told by a charcater in a literary work.
    • A. 

      Apostrophe

    • B. 

      Figure of Speech

    • C. 

      Figurative Language

    • D. 

      Anecdote

  • 69. 
    A figure of speech wherein the speaker speaks directly to something nonhuman.
    • A. 

      Apostrophe

    • B. 

      Figure of Speech

    • C. 

      Figurative Language

    • D. 

      Anecdote

  • 70. 
    An example of figurative language that states something that is not literally true in order to create an effect.
    • A. 

      Apostrophe

    • B. 

      Figurative Language

    • C. 

      Figure of Speech

    • D. 

      Anecdote

  • 71. 
    Vocabulary understood by members of a profession or trade but usually not by other members of the general public.
    • A. 

      Motif

    • B. 

      Jargon

    • C. 

      Vernacular

    • D. 

      Invective

  • 72. 
    A distinctive feature or repeated theme or idea in a piece of literature.
    • A. 

      Jargon

    • B. 

      Vernacular

    • C. 

      Motif

    • D. 

      Invective

  • 73. 
    A figure of speech whcih takes the form of a comparison between two unlike quantities for which a basis for comparison can be found, and which uses the words "like" or "as" in the comparison.
    • A. 

      Personification

    • B. 

      Simile

    • C. 

      Metaphor

    • D. 

      Point of View

  • 74. 
    A literary work that has to do with shephards and rustic settings.
    • A. 

      Point of View

    • B. 

      Pun

    • C. 

      Personification

    • D. 

      Pastoral

  • 75. 
    A piece of literature contains a speaker who is speaking either in the first person, telling things fromhhis or her own perspective, or in third person, telling things fromt he perspective of an onlooker.
    • A. 

      Point of View

    • B. 

      Personification

    • C. 

      Naturalism

    • D. 

      Nihilism

  • 76. 
    A figure of speech in which something nonhuman is given human characteristics.
    • A. 

      Understatement

    • B. 

      Nihilism

    • C. 

      Symbolism

    • D. 

      Personification

  • 77. 
    A philosophy that calls for the destruction of existing traditions, customs, beliefs, and institutions and requires its adherents to reject all values, including religious and aesthetic principles, in favor of belief in nothing.
    • A. 

      Modernism

    • B. 

      Nihilism

    • C. 

      Narrator

    • D. 

      Plot

  • 78. 
    A word or group of words in a literary work which appeal to one or more of the senses: sight, taste, touch, hearing, and smell.
    • A. 

      Inference

    • B. 

      Hyperbole

    • C. 

      Imagery

    • D. 

      Narrator

  • 79. 
    A figure of speech in which an overstatement or exaggeration occurs.
    • A. 

      Inference

    • B. 

      Hyperbole

    • C. 

      Imagery

    • D. 

      Narrator

  • 80. 
    A judgment based on reasoning rather than on direct or explicit statement. A conclusion based on facts or circumstances.
    • A. 

      Hyperbole

    • B. 

      Imagery

    • C. 

      Narrator

    • D. 

      Inference

  • 81. 
    The voice and implied speaker of a fictional work, to be distinguished from the actual living author.
    • A. 

      Narrator

    • B. 

      Inference

    • C. 

      Hyperbole

    • D. 

      Imagery

  • 82. 
    Placing of two items side by side to create a certain effect, reveal an attitude, or accomplish some other purpose.
    • A. 

      Juxtaposition

    • B. 

      Romanticism

    • C. 

      Satire

    • D. 

      Short Story

  • 83. 
    A piece of literature designed ro ridicule the subject of the work.
    • A. 

      Juxtaposition

    • B. 

      Satire

    • C. 

      Short Story

    • D. 

      Romanticism

  • 84. 
    A short fictional narrative.
    • A. 

      Romanticism

    • B. 

      Satire

    • C. 

      Short Story

    • D. 

      Juxtaposition

  • 85. 
    A movement that championed imagination and emotions as more powerful than reason and systematic thinking in literature.
    • A. 

      Short Story

    • B. 

      Juxtaposition

    • C. 

      Satire

    • D. 

      Romanticism