Internet Security

5 Questions | Total Attempts: 33

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Internet Security Quizzes & Trivia

Take pre-cautionary measures to protect yourself from Social Media Crimes, Phishing, and Job Scam.


Questions and Answers
  • 1. 
    Which of the three articles is this paragraph derived from: "Many Internet security experts consider the first virus attack on the PC to have occurred in 1986. By the early 1990s, viruses transmitted on floppy disks became ubiquitous. When the World Wide Web became widely available that same decade, viruses, worms and malware became problems in e-mail accounts, frustrating users who clicked on messages thought to be legitimate."
    • A. 

      Phishing

    • B. 

      Job Scam

    • C. 

      Social Media Crimes

  • 2. 
    Which of the three articles is this paragraph derived from: "In the new millennium, the most common form of malware attack has become known as drive-by downloads. While surfing on Google or Yahoo, spyware or a computer virus is automatically and invisibly downloaded on a computer, requiring no user interaction for the computer to be infected."
    • A. 

      Phishing

    • B. 

      Job Scam

    • C. 

      Social Media Crimes

  • 3. 
    Users can become a fan of "Facebook Security" and ...
    • A. 

      Attend their concerts

    • B. 

      Receive updates on how to protect their accounts.

    • C. 

      Receive a security stamp on their profile

  • 4. 
    Which of the three articles are these tips from: 1. Don't click on links in email, ever. Go to the Web site of the alleged inquiring party directly (type the URL into your browser or find it through Google) -- especially if it seems like a notice from your bank, eBay, or PayPal. 2. Start using OpenDNS. It's a great, free service that offers extra phishing protection for your entire home network without the need to install anything. 3. Upgrade your Web browser now. if you're still using Internet Explorer 6, you'd be better off not surfing the Web at all. If you're using Internet Explorer 7, I'd strongly recommend updating to IE 8 or switching to Firefox 3.0 instead. There are far more exploits in the wild for IE compared to Firefox. 4. Don't install anything until you've run it past a geek first. Same holds true for snakey emails. I always appreciate when my wife double checks with me before doing anything, although she's really good at detecting scams outright. 5. Verify the return address is a valid one. [email protected] is obviously not valid, though more legitimate-looking addresses can be spoofed as well; it's just another thing to double check. As for links within the email -- I can't stress this enough -- don't click them! 6. If you didn't initiate a transaction to which an email is referring, it's likely a scam. 7. Don't send people money, ever -- doesn't matter how "dire" their situation is. I've been taken by people I trusted before, so... just don't send people money. Tell your parents and grandparents not to do this, too -- please? Internet fraud is huge. 8. Avoid buying cameras and normally pricey gadgets from anywhere other than trusted retailers. Seriously, if a deal sounds too good to be true, it is. Absolutely. 1000000% fake
    • A. 

      Phishing

    • B. 

      Job Scam

    • C. 

      Social Media Crimes

  • 5. 
    Which of the three articles is this sample advice from: 1. Hold tight to your cash "No legitimate employer asks you for money. This is a foolproof tip off that something's not right," Giroir says. "There are a number of scams that work this way. You deposit your money in an offshore account and wait for your investment to make you wealthy, or you purchase a list of high-paying jobs you can do from home. Whatever the scam is, don't fall for it." 2. Make money while you sleep! "Beware of ads that make outrageous claims, don't specify job duties and don't require that you send a résumé. Legitimate employers are seeking candidates with specific skills, knowledge and education. Watch for ads, even for entry-level jobs, that use the phrase 'no experience necessary,' especially when there is a promise of big money," Giroir says. 3. "Work at home" appears in the header "'Work from home' is not a job title," Durst warns. "If it appears in the ad header, there's a good chance it's a come on. Scammers can rarely resist including it in the header -- it's the bait of their 'hook' as they fish for desperate people to reel in." 4. Miracles arrive in your inbox "How could this man from Romania have known you were looking for home-based work? Miracles do happen, but not via SPAM," Durst says. "Move [the e-mail] to your trash file without using the 'remove me from this list' link you're likely to find at the bottom of the page. These links are often used to confirm that your -email address is active and using them can result in even more SPAM."
    • A. 

      Phishing

    • B. 

      Job Scam

    • C. 

      Social Medica Crimes