Identity Theft

10 Questions | Total Attempts: 122

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Identity Quizzes & Trivia

This is a pre and post test, you will complete the test before and after the group


Questions and Answers
  • 1. 
    What is Identity Theft?
    • A. 

      Taking a victim’s identity to obtain credit

    • B. 

      Stealing someone's license

    • C. 

      When someone cuts their hair or changes certain features of themselves to look like you

    • D. 

      I don't know

  • 2. 
    • A. 

      Asking you for it

    • B. 

      By knowing you personally and everything about you

    • C. 

      All that is needed is your social security number, your birth date and other identifying information such as your address and phone number and whatever else they can find out about you. With this information, and a false driver’s license with their own picture, they can begin the crime.

    • D. 

      I do not know

  • 3. 
    Where would someone get information about you?
    • A. 

      Your doctor, accountant, lawyer, dentist, school, place of work, health insurance carrier, and many others have your identifying information.

    • B. 

      In a dumpster (if this information is not disposed of with a shredder, a "dumpster-diver" could pick up the information)

    • C. 

      On the internet, at courts, and accessible from public documents.

    • D. 

      All of the above

  • 4. 
    How can you stop the fraud?
    • A. 

      There is no way to stop the fraud

    • B. 

      As soon as you are made aware of the fraud you must immediately contact the three major credit reporting agencies by phone and letter to put a fraud alert on your credit profile.

    • C. 

      I do not know

    • D. 

      Get copies of the reports so that you will know which are the fraud accounts, and call the police in the county where the fraud occurs. A creditor will contact you or you will be denied credit, or you will see charges that are not yours on bills

    • E. 

      B & D

  • 5. 
    Should you change your social security number if you are a victim of identity-theft?
    • A. 

      No. You have had that number for many years and it is attached to many documents, including your credit report and various other private and governmental documents.

    • B. 

      Yes if you don't have your old social is not active then they can't use it

    • C. 

      I don't know

  • 6. 
    • A. 

      Yes absolutely if someone else has them why would you continue to keep it open

    • B. 

      No pay off what someone else charged and then ask for a new account number and pin

    • C. 

      No. Since your credit worthiness is shaky due to the fraud, you will probably have a hard time getting new credit in the near future. If you have stopped your credit, you may have trouble getting loans, a rental car, or even a job. Instead, for those accounts that have not be touched by the impersonator, immediately notify each credit grantor of your true accounts, that you are a victim of identity fraud.

    • D. 

      I dont' know

  • 7. 
    • A. 

      Aside from getting a credit report at least once a year to monitor your credit, you should always be alert when your monthly financial statements arrive.

    • B. 

      If you're moving, contact all your creditors and update them of your address changes immediately. You don't want credit information and new credit cards being delivered to the wrong address. Likewise, if your credit card expires and you don't receive a new one, call your creditor immediately.

    • C. 

      Get a cross-cut shredder and shred bank statements, credit card offers, or any other document with your financial information on it.

    • D. 

      Be watchful of shoulder-surfers. At ATMs and phone booths, thieves will stand close enough to see PIN numbers punched in by users.

    • E. 

      All of the above

  • 8. 
    What are some of the new credit card laws
    • A. 

      Limited interest rate hikes: Interest rate hikes on existing balances would be allowed only under limited conditions, such as when a promotional rate ends, there is a variable rate or if the cardholder makes a late payment. Interest rates on new transactions can increase only after the first year. Significant changes in terms on accounts cannot occur without 45 days' advance notice of the change.

    • B. 

      Limited credit to young adults: Credit card issuers will be banned from issuing credit cards to anyone under 21, unless they have adult co-signers on the accounts or can show proof they have enough income to repay the card debt. Credit card companies must stay at least 1,000 feet from college campuses if they are offering free pizza or other gifts to entice students to apply for credit cards.

    • C. 

      More time to pay monthly bills: Under the credit card law, issuers would have to give card account holders "a reasonable amount of time" to make payments on monthly bills. That means payments would be due at least 21 days after they are mailed or delivered. Consumers have complained about due dates that change without notice or are moved up, giving them less time to pay their bills and increasing the likelihood of late fees.

    • D. 

      Limits on over-limit fees: Consumers must "opt in" to over-limit fees. Those who opt out would have their transactions rejected if they exceed their credit limits, thus avoiding over-limit fees. Fees charged for going over the limit must be reasonable.

    • E. 

      All of the above

  • 9. 
    What does your credit card company have to tell you?
    • A. 

      How long it will take to pay off your balance

    • B. 

      When they plan to increase your rate or other fees

    • C. 

      Late Payment Warning

    • D. 

      All of the above

    • E. 

      I don't know

  • 10. 
    What is one benefit that a young consumer will recieve from the new credit card laws?
    • A. 

      Nothing

    • B. 

      Protections for young consumers Credit-card companies face greater restrictions on marketing cards to college students. More generally, those under 21 will have to prove that they have the means to pay off their card limits or have a cosigner before they can be granted a card.

    • C. 

      More credit limits

    • D. 

      I don't know