Gld Ch. 9t-3(Cell)

46 Questions | Total Attempts: 40

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Cell Quizzes & Trivia

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Questions and Answers
  • 1. 
    1. Which of the following cells produce new bone?
    • A. 

      Osteocytes

    • B. 

      Osteoblasts

    • C. 

      Osteoclasts

    • D. 

      Stem cells from the bone marrow

  • 2. 
    2. What is the chemical transmitter released at the neuromuscular junction?
    • A. 

      Norepinephrine

    • B. 

      GABA

    • C. 

      Serotonin

    • D. 

      Acetylcholine

  • 3. 
    3. What are the two types of bone tissue?
    • A. 

      Vascular and nonvascular

    • B. 

      Spongy and calcified

    • C. 

      Compact and cancellous

    • D. 

      Dense and pliable

  • 4. 
    4. Which of the following would identify an open or compound fracture?
    • A. 

      The skin and soft tissue are exposed at the fracture site.

    • B. 

      A bone is crushed into many small pieces.

    • C. 

      The bone appears bent with a partial fracture line.

    • D. 

      One end of a bone is forced into an adjacent bone.

  • 5. 
    5. Which of the following describes a Colles’ fracture?
    • A. 

      The distal radius is broken.

    • B. 

      The distal fibula is broken.

    • C. 

      A vertebra appears crushed.

    • D. 

      A spontaneous fracture occurs in weakened bone.

  • 6. 
    6. During the fracture healing process, the hematoma:
    • A. 

      Is broken down and absorbed immediately.

    • B. 

      Provides the base for bone cells to produce new bone.

    • C. 

      Is the structure into which granulation tissue grows.

    • D. 

      Produces fibroblasts to lay down new cartilage.

  • 7. 
    7. When a fracture is healing, the procallus or fibrocartilaginous callus:
    • A. 

      Can bear weight.

    • B. 

      Serves as a splint across the fracture site.

    • C. 

      Is the tissue that lays down new cartilage.

    • D. 

      Is made up of new bone.

  • 8. 
    8. The inflammation surrounding a fracture site during the first few days may complicate healing by causing:
    • A. 

      Excessive bone movement.

    • B. 

      Severe ischemia and tissue necrosis.

    • C. 

      Malunion or nonunion.

    • D. 

      Fat emboli to form.

  • 9. 
    9. What is a sign of a dislocation?
    • A. 

      Crepitus

    • B. 

      Pain and tenderness

    • C. 

      Increased range of motion at a joint

    • D. 

      Deformity at a joint

  • 10. 
    10. All of the following predispose to osteoporosis EXCEPT:
    • A. 

      Weight-bearing activity.

    • B. 

      A sedentary lifestyle.

    • C. 

      Long-term intake of glucocorticoids.

    • D. 

      Calcium deficit.

  • 11. 
    11. Which of the following statements does NOT apply to osteoporosis?
    • A. 

      Bone resorption is greater than bone formation.

    • B. 

      It causes compression fractures of the vertebrae.

    • C. 

      Osteoporosis is always a primary disorder.

    • D. 

      It often leads to kyphosis and loss of height.

  • 12. 
    12. Which of the following best describes the typical bone pain caused by osteogenic sarcoma?
    • A. 

      Intermittent, increasing with activity

    • B. 

      Sharp, increased with joint movement

    • C. 

      Mild, aching when weight-bearing

    • D. 

      Steady, severe, and persisting with rest

  • 13. 
    13. How is Duchenne’s muscular dystrophy inherited?
    • A. 

      Autosomal recessive gene

    • B. 

      X-linked recessive gene

    • C. 

      Autosomal dominant gene

    • D. 

      Codominant gene

  • 14. 
    14. Which of the following is true about Duchenne’s muscular dystrophy?
    • A. 

      There is difficulty climbing stairs or standing up at 2 to 3 years of age.

    • B. 

      It involves only the legs and pelvis.

    • C. 

      Skeletal muscle atrophy can be seen in the legs of a toddler.

    • D. 

      It cannot be detected in any carriers.

  • 15. 
    15. The most common type of joint, which are freely movable, are called:
    • A. 

      Synarthroses

    • B. 

      Amphiarthroses

    • C. 

      Anarthroses

    • D. 

      Diarthroses

  • 16. 
    16. Which of the following is characteristic of osteoarthritis?
    • A. 

      Inflammation and fibrosis develop at the joints.

    • B. 

      Degeneration of articulating cartilage occurs in the large joints.

    • C. 

      It progresses bilaterally through the small joints.

    • D. 

      There are no changes in the bone at the affected joints.

  • 17. 
    17. What is a typical characteristic of the pain caused by osteoarthritis?
    • A. 

      Decreases over time

    • B. 

      Quite severe in the early stages

    • C. 

      Aggravated by general muscle aching

    • D. 

      Increased with weight-bearing and activity

  • 18. 
    18. What limits joint movement in osteoarthritis?
    • A. 

      The osteophytes and irregular cartilage surface

    • B. 

      The wider joint space

    • C. 

      Decreased amount of synovial fluid in the cavity

    • D. 

      Fibrosis involving the joint capsule and ligaments

  • 19. 
    19. Joints affected by osteoarthritis can sometimes affect healthy joints by:
    • A. 

      Causing enzymes to be released that travel to other joints.

    • B. 

      Bacteria traveling from the affected join to a healthy one through the bloodstream.

    • C. 

      Inflammation and edema affecting the entire limb.

    • D. 

      The affected individual’s exerting stress on the normal joint to protect the damaged one.

  • 20. 
    20. What is the typical joint involvement with rheumatoid arthritis?
    • A. 

      Random single joints, progressing to involve other joints

    • B. 

      Bilateral small joints, symmetrical progression to other joints

    • C. 

      Abused or damaged joints first, then joints damaged by compensatory movement

    • D. 

      Progressive degeneration in selected joints

  • 21. 
    21. What is the basic pathology of rheumatoid arthritis?
    • A. 

      Degenerative disorder involving the small joints

    • B. 

      Chronic inflammatory disorder affecting all joints

    • C. 

      Systemic inflammatory disorder due to an autoimmune reaction

    • D. 

      Inflammatory disorder causing damage to many organs

  • 22. 
    22. How is the articular cartilage damaged in rheumatoid arthritis?
    • A. 

      Enzymatic destruction by the pannus

    • B. 

      Inflamed synovial membrane covers the cartilage

    • C. 

      Fibrous tissue connects the ends of the bones

    • D. 

      Blood supply to the cartilage is lost

  • 23. 
    23. How does the joint appear during an exacerbation of rheumatoid arthritis?
    • A. 

      Relatively normal

    • B. 

      Enlarged, firm, crepitus with movement

    • C. 

      Deformed, pale, and nodular

    • D. 

      Red, warm, swollen, and tender to touch

  • 24. 
    24. Ankylosis and deformity develop in rheumatoid arthritis because:
    • A. 

      Skeletal muscle hypertrophies.

    • B. 

      Fibrosis occurs in the joint.

    • C. 

      Replacement cartilage changes alignment.

    • D. 

      Ligaments and tendons shorten.

  • 25. 
    25. Systemic effects of rheumatoid arthritis are manifested as:
    • A. 

      Nodules in various tissues, severe fatigue, and anorexia.

    • B. 

      Headache, leukopenia, and high fever.

    • C. 

      Swelling and dysfunction in many organs.

    • D. 

      Progressive damage to a joint.