Do You Know About Genetics And Genes? Quiz

23 Questions | Total Attempts: 202

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Genetics Quizzes & Trivia

A gene is the basic physical and functional unit of heredity, whereas genetics involves the study of specific and limited numbers of genes. As an aspiring medical practitioner, just how much do you know about genes as a whole and do you think you know just enough to tackle this test? Why don’t you give it a chance and be sure to come back for more tests like it?


Questions and Answers
  • 1. 
    Embryonic lethal alleles cannot be dominant.  
    • A. 

      True

    • B. 

      False

  • 2. 
    At a single genetic locus, a diploid individual may have more than two different alleles.  
    • A. 

      True

    • B. 

      False

  • 3. 
    Skin color in humans is an example of a discontinuous trait.  
    • A. 

      True

    • B. 

      False

  • 4. 
    For a given species, sex-influenced traits are expressed in only one sex and have zero penetrance in the other sex.  
    • A. 

      True

    • B. 

      False

  • 5. 
    All human ABO blood group alleles are co-dominant.  
    • A. 

      True

    • B. 

      False

  • 6. 
    Epistatic genes must be dominant.  
    • A. 

      True

    • B. 

      False

  • 7. 
    Recessive alleles form no gene products, and thus are not expressed.  
    • A. 

      True

    • B. 

      False

  • 8. 
    A complementation group is a complete set of the genes controlling a phenotypic trait.  
    • A. 

      True

    • B. 

      False

  • 9. 
    Genomic imprinting and genetic anticipation both involve the inhibition of specific genes, or chromosomes, based on parental origin.  
    • A. 

      True

    • B. 

      False

  • 10. 
    A temperature-sensitive allele is an example of a phenocopy.  
    • A. 

      True

    • B. 

      False

  • 11. 
    Epistasis involves intra-allelic gene interaction.  
    • A. 

      True

    • B. 

      False

  • 12. 
    Sex-influenced traits are, by definition, on the X or Y chromosome.  
    • A. 

      True

    • B. 

      False

  • 13. 
    All the genetic material in a eukaryotic cell is found in the nucleus.  
    • A. 

      True

    • B. 

      False

  • 14. 
    Interactions among the human ABO blood group alleles involve _______ and ________.  
    • A. 

      Co-dominance

    • B. 

      Incomplete dominance

    • C. 

      Complete dominance

    • D. 

      Epistasis

    • E. 

      Continuous variation

  • 15. 
    Multi-factorial traits are influenced by _______ and ________.  
    • A. 

      Multiple genes

    • B. 

      Pleiotropy

    • C. 

      Dominance

    • D. 

      Genetic imprinting

    • E. 

      Environment

  • 16. 
    Genes can be located in which organelles (circle all that are right)?  
    • A. 

      Nucleus

    • B. 

      Ribosome

    • C. 

      Chloroplast

    • D. 

      Golgi

    • E. 

      Mitochondria

    • F. 

      Vacuole

  • 17. 
    The phenomenon in which a gene’s expression is determined by its parental origin is called __________.  
    • A. 

      Sex influenced

    • B. 

      Sex limited

    • C. 

      Genomic imprinting

    • D. 

      Maternal effect

    • E. 

      Paternal effect

  • 18. 
    What phenomenon describes a genetic trait that is expressed more strongly or earlier in development with each generation?  
    • A. 

      Epigenetics

    • B. 

      Maternally determined progeny phenotypes

    • C. 

      Epistasis

    • D. 

      Anticipation

    • E. 

      Norm of reaction

  • 19. 
    In order to determine if mutations from different organisms that exhibit the same phenotype are allelic, which test would you perform?  
    • A. 

      Test cross

    • B. 

      Epistasis test

    • C. 

      Complementation test

    • D. 

      Allelic series test

    • E. 

      Biochemical test

  • 20. 
    Define the phrase “norm of reaction” and explain how it influences how scientists design experiments and report their results.  
    • A. 

      Each genotype can have a range of phenotypes depending on environmental conditions such as temperature, humidity, light, nutrition, and so on. The range of phenotypes is called norm of reaction. Therefore, it is important that scientists strive to compare results from experiments that were done under controlled conditions and that those conditions are carefully recorded and reported. Otherwise, the norm of reaction may be such that the experiment is difficult to repeat.

    • B. 

      Not listed

  • 21. 
    In some plant species, a single pair of alleles is involved in both flower color and stem color. For example, a plant with red flowers may also have red stems, whereas white-flowered varieties of the same species have green stems. How would you explain this observation?  
    • A. 

      This phenomenon, called pleiotropy, is the condition where a single gene affects multiple, apparently unrelated, phenotypic traits. In many other cases of pleiotropism, a single gene affects more than two phenotypic traits. For example, a mutant white-eye gene in Drosophila (fruit fly) also affects the structure and color of internal organs, causes reduced fertility, and decreases life expectancy. Another example involves sickle-cell anemia in humans (caused by a single nucleotide change in a hemoglobin gene), which has adverse affects on different organs and tissues.

    • B. 

      Not listed

  • 22. 
    How do incomplete and co-dominance differ?  
    • A. 

      Incomplete dominant traits show a blended phenotype in the heterozygote (an intermediate flower color), while co-dominant traits show both phenotypes in the heterozygote (e.g., AB alleles of blood type).

    • B. 

      Co-dominant traits show a blended phenotype in the heterozygote (an intermediate flower color), while Incomplete dominant traits show both phenotypes in the heterozygote (e.g., AB alleles of blood type).

    • C. 

      None

    • D. 

      All of the above

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