Film Exam Prep

60 Questions | Total Attempts: 170

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Film Exam Prep

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  • 1. 
    • A. 

      Examining implicit meaning.

    • B. 

      Analyzing form.

    • C. 

      Going beyond viewers’ expectations.

    • D. 

      Searching for a subtext.

  • 2. 
    The two images above exist in a relationship that can be described as:
    • A. 

      Quotation.

    • B. 

      Intertextual reference.

    • C. 

      Similar mise-en-scene.

    • D. 

      All of the above.

  • 3. 
    An approach that reads those two images in relation to one another:
    • A. 

      Is dependent on the filmmaker's intentions.

    • B. 

      Focuses on the expectations of audience.

    • C. 

      Focuses on reading practices and media literacy.

    • D. 

      Is contextual.

  • 4. 
    The choreography of characters in this shot contains the women on the porch. The result is:
    • A. 

      The shot implicitly aligns itself with the ideology of the Western that the West is not safe for women and children.

    • B. 

      The women are better lit, resulting in a naturalistic effect.

    • C. 

      A visually symmetric, and therefore balanced and interesting frame.

    • D. 

      A sense that in this film women will be the main protagonists.

  • 5. 
    The two frames from the shot in Once Upon a Time in the West exemplify how mise-en-scene embodies:
    • A. 

      Plot information about the feast organized in the remote farm.

    • B. 

      The Western’s obsessions with binaries such as nature/culture, wilderness/civilization.

    • C. 

      Montage conveying gender tensions (gun and girl).

    • D. 

      A perfect example of verisimilitude.

  • 6. 
    Crampton and Power quote Der Dorian (p. 245) who discusses virtual and virtuous wars. In your mind, video games such as Call of Duty set themselves as promoting a sense of:
    • A. 

      Virtual war.

    • B. 

      Virtuous war.

    • C. 

      Both virtual and virtuous war.

    • D. 

      Neither.

  • 7. 
    According to Crampton and Power Saving Private Ryan was perceived to be an authentic representation of WWII. Based on the lecture and reading it seems that audiences:
    • A. 

      Confuse realistic style with authenticity.

    • B. 

      Are overwhelmed by the documentary qualities of the film.

    • C. 

      Find death at war to be glorified due to the gory naturalistic portrayal.

    • D. 

      Cannot discern between explicit and implicit meanings.

  • 8. 
    Both Saving Private Ryan and Inglourious Basterds focus explicitly on WWII. However, it could be argued that implicitly, and more specifically, ideologically:
    • A. 

      Inglourious Basterds has the preoccupations of a Western.

    • B. 

      Saving Private Ryan should be considered a Vietnam era film.

    • C. 

      Both films don’t glorify the war, and as such are a unique evolution of the genre.

    • D. 

      Both films reflect the preoccupations of current wars, especially The Second Gulf War.

  • 9. 
    The mise-en-scene of these two shots:
    • A. 

      Reverses traditional association of high/low camera angle.

    • B. 

      Simply represents the height and position of each character.

    • C. 

      Implies that the German colonel will loom over the rest of the film.

    • D. 

      Mocks Lt. Aldo Raine.

  • 10. 
    The image above ties the iconography of Inglourious Basterds to:
    • A. 

      WWII film genre.

    • B. 

      Contemporary War genre.

    • C. 

      Italian Neorealism.

    • D. 

      Spaghetti Western.

  • 11. 
    Which of the following terms does not belong with the others?
    • A. 

      Colonialism

    • B. 

      Imperialism

    • C. 

      Euro-centrism

    • D. 

      All of those terms are strongly related to each other.

  • 12. 
    Which of the following terms does not belong with the others?
    • A. 

      Colonialism

    • B. 

      Communism

    • C. 

      Capitalism

    • D. 

      Neo-colonialism

  • 13. 
    What is unique about the mise-en-scene of this shot?
    • A. 

      The violence is staged up front and centre.

    • B. 

      Lt. Aldo Rainer is eating while someone dies.

    • C. 

      The frame is asymmetrical, therefore dynamic.

    • D. 

      The 180 degree rule is broken.

  • 14. 
    The mise-en-scene of this shot is designed to:
    • A. 

      Provide a bird’s eye point of view of the events.

    • B. 

      Compare war with entertainment in ancient Rome.

    • C. 

      Allow psychological distance from the violence taking place.

    • D. 

      Foreground the notion the Basterds are operating in a wilderness.

  • 15. 
    Kristof Haavik argues that Black Robe takes a position about the debate between Aboriginal and Christian beliefs. What does the film conclude (according to Haavik)?
    • A. 

      The film promotes the epistemic point of view of Father Laforgue (since he baptizes the Hurons).

    • B. 

      It establishes a diabolic binary between the two religions (as both sides seem to lose in the end).

    • C. 

      Black Robe affirms aboriginal spirituality (because Chomina’s dream comes true).

    • D. 

      It humanizes both positions, trying to bridge the cultural gaps (hence the baptism scene).

  • 16. 
    Which of the following is not part of point of view (POV)?
    • A. 

      A view from a character’s physical perspective

    • B. 

      A view from a character’s psychological perspective

    • C. 

      A view from a character’s epistemological perspective

    • D. 

      An omniscient view (a bird’s eye view)

  • 17. 
    The two frames above are taken from the scene in which Laforgue is lost in the forest. They both use a similar mise-en-scene, and they cut on a continuing panning movement. The article claims that the juxtaposition of these two shots is done in order to:
    • A. 

      Introduce a parallel narrative framework.

    • B. 

      Create a visual argument about the value of Aboriginal civilization.

    • C. 

      Show God’s omnipresence in Laforgue’s consciousness.

    • D. 

      Present Laforgue’s flashback as he fears death.

  • 18. 
    The send-off ceremony scene at the beginning of Black Robe creates a parallel between Jesuit and Algonquin cultures by:
    • A. 

      Using eye-line match cutting between Champlain and Chomina.

    • B. 

      Relying on Daniel’s POV to tell the story.

    • C. 

      Constructing jump-cuts to accentuate the cultural differences.

    • D. 

      Using crosscutting as the two communities prepare for the ceremony.

  • 19. 
    • A. 

      Father Laforgue

    • B. 

      Daniel

    • C. 

      Chomina

    • D. 

      Unlike Dances With Wolves, there is not one perspective that is prioritized.

  • 20. 
    The implication of scenes such as the puppy and gramophone in Nanook of the North is:
    • A. 

      The Inuit people are uncivilized.

    • B. 

      The Inuit people are brutal savages.

    • C. 

      Flaherty was intimately connected with his subjects.

    • D. 

      We have ethnographic evidence as to the life of Inuits in the 1920s.

  • 21. 
    The proponents of Realist cinema in the 1940s refrained from relying on:
    • A. 

      The mimetic tendencies of the camera.

    • B. 

      Long takes of continuous action.

    • C. 

      Montage editing.

    • D. 

      Naturalistic mise-en-scene.

  • 22. 
    The scene where Mathieu is looking with binoculars onto the Casbah exemplifies:
    • A. 

      Virilo’s theory of the virtual war.

    • B. 

      Reflexivity.

    • C. 

      Harrison’s thesis about mise-en-abyme.

    • D. 

      Neorealist design.

  • 23. 
    Which of the film clips shown in class belongs to the studio system?
    • A. 

      His Girl Friday

    • B. 

      Dances with Wolves

    • C. 

      The English Patient

    • D. 

      Bicycle Thief

  • 24. 
    Italian Neorealism came about as an aesthetic form of criticism, or as an alternative, to:
    • A. 

      Documentary aesthetics.

    • B. 

      The studio system.

    • C. 

      Colonialist ideology in film.

    • D. 

      Formalist film.

  • 25. 
    • A. 

      They both outline a problematic colonialist history, that the film’s drama avoids touching upon.

    • B. 

      They both focus on Orientalist practices in the films discussed.

    • C. 

      Each argues against the anti-colonialist style of the film, claiming it defeats the film’s purpose.

    • D. 

      They base their analysis on the problematic relations between realism as a style, and historical facts.

  • 26. 
    Barsam and Monahan argue that the mise-en-scene of a film:
    • A. 

      Is subordinated to the realist demands on cinema.

    • B. 

      Sometimes overwhelms the narrative.

    • C. 

      Needs to be servicing the narrative demands of the film.

    • D. 

      Builds design and composition in conflicting relations.

  • 27. 
    In this scene the mise-en-scene is organized to:
    • A. 

      Emphasize the sexist attitude of the soldiers at the checkpoint .

    • B. 

      Highlight the woman’s masquerade as French.

    • C. 

      Demonize the woman as a cold-hearted terrorist.

    • D. 

      Show the surveillance techniques of the French.

  • 28. 
    Orientalism is:
    • A. 

      Fields of scientific study of the Orient (such as archeology, ethnography, history).

    • B. 

      A form of stereotyping targeting people from the Orient.

    • C. 

      A critical look at the relationship between researcher and his/her subjects.

    • D. 

      Both A and B.

    • E. 

      Both A and C.

  • 29. 
    • A. 

      They both use mise-an-abyme.

    • B. 

      They are both reflexive films.

    • C. 

      They both rely on non-diegetic music to enhance emotional impact.

    • D. 

      All of the above

  • 30. 
    Barsam and Monahan would describe this form of mise-en-scene (from Bicycle Thief) as:
    • A. 

      Meticulous design.

    • B. 

      Staging in the studio.

    • C. 

      Composition using a location setting.

    • D. 

      They would argue this type of cinematography should not be considered mise-en-scene.

  • 31. 
    Ajami belongs to the following genre(s):
    • A. 

      Neorealism

    • B. 

      Hyperlink film

    • C. 

      Documentary

    • D. 

      Both A and B

    • E. 

      Both A and C

  • 32. 
    • A. 

      They are different names for the same concept.

    • B. 

      They are different aspects of the story.

    • C. 

      The plot is the linear trajectory of a film, the narrative a post-viewing product.

    • D. 

      Narrative relates to cinematic elements (such as mise-en-scene, editing, etc.), while plot relates to the content.

  • 33. 
    The mise-en-scene of the torture scene is designed to:
    • A. 

      Enhance our sense that Barnes is a hero who withstands torture.

    • B. 

      Designate Barnes’ ruin as an aging man, and as a CIA agent.

    • C. 

      Demonize the Arabs in the film in general.

    • D. 

      Show us that Barnes is fluent in Arabic.

  • 34. 
    The storyline of Wassim Khan in Syriana is a good example of:
    • A. 

      An approach that ties Khan’s radicalization to economic deprivation.

    • B. 

      A typical Western media approach that ties terrorism and Islam.

    • C. 

      An Orientalist sub-plot unrelated to the main plot of the film.

    • D. 

      A good example of “blow-back."

  • 35. 
    Following Camolli and Narboni we can argue that Syriana is:
    • A. 

      A film that is political in content but not in form.

    • B. 

      A film that is only superficially political in content.

    • C. 

      A film that is political in both content and form.

    • D. 

      A typical Third Worldist film.

  • 36. 
    Which of the characters in Syriana ends up surprising audiences by revealing information that he knew all along, and the audience did not suspect?
    • A. 

      Bob Barnes (George Clooney- the a CIA agent in Iran, Lebanon, and Saudi Arabia)

    • B. 

      Bryan Woodman (Matt Damon as the oil consultant to Saudi prince Nassir)

    • C. 

      Bennett Holiday (Jeffrey Wright as he investigates oil companies merge)

    • D. 

      Wassim Khan (Mazhar Munir the an unemployed Pakistani in Saudi Arabia)

  • 37. 
    David Gregory argues that Syriana and Why We Fight expose the real interests of the United States in the Middle East as:
    • A. 

      An economic interest in oil.

    • B. 

      An imperialist attempt to convert the Middle East to the “American way of life.”

    • C. 

      An Orientalist tendency towards the Other .

    • D. 

      To find an enemy for the Militarized Industrial complex.

  • 38. 
    Barsam and Monahan identify lighting as an important aspect of mise-en-scene, which is decided upon by:
    • A. 

      The cinematographer shooting the film.

    • B. 

      The director, as he is overall responsible for the look of the film.

    • C. 

      The gaffer who lights the scene.

    • D. 

      The storyboard artists in the pre-production.

  • 39. 
    Hyperlink narratives share a tendency to:
    • A. 

      Rely heavily on computer graphics.

    • B. 

      Present a story without a beginning or an end.

    • C. 

      Present parallel stories that don’t merge into one climax.

    • D. 

      Are interactive films that can be screened only on computers.

  • 40. 
    In designing the character of Bob Barnes, George Clooney forms a critique of American values utilizing:
    • A. 

      His own star aura as a super capable male.

    • B. 

      A view of ruined and aging masculinity.

    • C. 

      A sober presentation of an amoral CIA agent.

    • D. 

      All of the above.

  • 41. 
    Barsam and Monahan claim that films like Bicycle Thief are a good example of:
    • A. 

      Lack of mise-en-scene (since they are shot on location).

    • B. 

      A masterful choreography of real spaces, rather than studio space.

    • C. 

      Expressionist European films.

    • D. 

      Deliberate use of costume, makeup and hairstyle.

  • 42. 
    Maria Pramaggiore’s reading of 11’09”01- September 11th focuses primarily on which cinematic aspect?
    • A. 

      Editing

    • B. 

      Mise-en-scene

    • C. 

      Cinematography

    • D. 

      Sound design

  • 43. 
    News media reporting of the September 11th 2001 attacks needs to be understood as reflecting a relationship between:
    • A. 

      Entertainment industries and political events.

    • B. 

      Responsible journalism and jaded opinions.

    • C. 

      Documentary film and onsite reporting.

    • D. 

      Truth and ideology

  • 44. 
    In Fahrenheit 911 Michael Moore chooses to keep the screen black during the time the towers are coming down because:
    • A. 

      He wants to be respectful to the victims (which news outlets weren’t).

    • B. 

      He wants us to focus on sound so we identify with the victims.

    • C. 

      He is breaking away from iconic representations of the event.

    • D. 

      All of the above

  • 45. 
    One difference between Moore’s Fahrenheit 911 and Hijacking Catastrophe is:
    • A. 

      The former relies on narrative conventions, the latter on documentary ones.

    • B. 

      Moore has a villain to crucify, while Earp and Jhally criticize a system/ideology.

    • C. 

      Moore inserts himself as the protagonist/focalizer, while Earp and Jhally are missing from their film.

    • D. 

      All of the above

  • 46. 
    The late 20th century saw a shift in cultural criticism:
    • A. 

      From formalism to structuralism.

    • B. 

      From postmodernism to identity politics.

    • C. 

      From analyzing icons to studying signs (semiotics).

    • D. 

      From focus on the author to focus on reception.

  • 47. 
    In 09’11”01- September 11th Ken Loach’s film segment is unique because:
    • A. 

      It is the only film identified as originating from one country (United Kingdom) but its plot takes place in another (Chile).

    • B. 

      It reminds viewers that there was another important September 11th in history, when the U.S. backed coup d’etat in Chile ousted the democratically elected Salvador Allende.

    • C. 

      It is the most experimental film in the group.

    • D. 

      It exemplifies the City Symphony approach as Prammagiore describes it in her article.

  • 48. 
    In 09’11”01- September 11th Lelouch and Penn’s films were criticized by the Village Voice for:
    • A. 

      Using the Sept 11th tragedy as a backdrop for their narratives.

    • B. 

      Being too experimental and difficult to understand.

    • C. 

      Using iconic representations of the tragedy in stereotypical ways.

    • D. 

      A sharp disjunction between image and sound.

  • 49. 
    The mise-en-scene of the two images above is designed to:
    • A. 

      Emphasize the gap between sound and image tracks in the films.

    • B. 

      Present the main character slightly “off centre” but prominently.

    • C. 

      Enunciate the “glocal” nature of the films.

    • D. 

      Be reflexive, to remind us of the mediated nature of the event.

  • 50. 
    Open and closed frames refer to:
    • A. 

      Narratives with or without closure.

    • B. 

      Realism and formalism respectively.

    • C. 

      Composition that draws attention “off-screen” or “on screen.”

    • D. 

      The use of different grounds to achieve or restrict depth of field.

  • 51. 
    The image above (from Aladdin) exemplifies:
    • A. 

      Orientalism.

    • B. 

      Stereotypes.

    • C. 

      Hyper sexuality.

    • D. 

      All of the above.

  • 52. 
    Orientalism and Colonialism use this to reduce the agency of colonized subjects.
    • A. 

      Stereotypes

    • B. 

      Capitalist ideology

    • C. 

      Ideology in general

    • D. 

      Binary oppositions

  • 53. 
    In representing checkpoints, The Bubble and Paradise Now differ greatly. What is the most pronounced aspect of the difference?
    • A. 

      Each film is loyal to its country’s official ideology.

    • B. 

      The Bubble relies on stereotypes while Paradise Now subverts them.

    • C. 

      The Bubble ironically is more critical of Israel’s policies in the West Bank than Paradise Now.

    • D. 

      Paradise Now is sympathetic to suicide operations while The Bubble is critical of them.

  • 54. 
    A comparison of the same two scenes mentioned in question 3 also shows:
    • A. 

      The way censorship works to limit freedom of expression.

    • B. 

      The way self-representation allows for diverse images of the same reality.

    • C. 

      The difference between first and third cinema.

    • D. 

      The problems with self-censorship.

  • 55. 
    The image above (from The Simpsons episode "In the Holyland") makes a visual claim that takes on:
    • A. 

      Orientalizing perceptions about Israel and the Middle East (as seen in the architecture of the arches).

    • B. 

      Stereotypes of American tourists (as loud, obnoxious, etc).

    • C. 

      Ideological blind spots in the American public vis-à-vis Israel-America relations.

    • D. 

      A parody of anti-Semitic stereotypes.

  • 56. 
    According to Bronstein, Paradise Now:
    • A. 

      Uses the mise-en-scene of melodrama.

    • B. 

      Uses pre-digested generic codes of political thriller.

    • C. 

      Aligns itself with anti-colonial critique.

    • D. 

      Is a subversive alternative to all of the above.

  • 57. 
    Bronstein suggests that Abu-Assad follows Partha Chaterjee who suggests:
    • A. 

      Violent anti-colonial struggle becomes as oppressive as colonialism.

    • B. 

      Anti-colonial resistance is a direct response to colonial aggression.

    • C. 

      There is an economy of spectacular violence in the Middle East.

    • D. 

      It is poverty and not religious fanaticism that leads to suicide operations.

  • 58. 
    Paradise Now can be described as:
    • A. 

      First Cinema.

    • B. 

      Second Cinema.

    • C. 

      Third Cinema.

    • D. 

      Anti-colonial film.

  • 59. 
    The mise-en-scene of this shot is based on an intertextual reference in order to:
    • A. 

      Present Sa’id and Khaled as innocent victims.

    • B. 

      Humanize subjects that are traditionally demonized by mainstream media.

    • C. 

      Glorify martyrdom.

    • D. 

      All of the above

  • 60. 
    A unique aspect of the way the above image (question 9) is read by audiences is:
    • A. 

      Its reference to DaVinci’s painting.

    • B. 

      It can only be understood by media literate people.

    • C. 

      It works primarily for one audience group, and not others.

    • D. 

      It is a mise-en-abyme.