ESL Carnival Of Be/ Esp

24 Questions

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ESL Carnival Of Be/ Esp

This quiz is a review of the blog posts written by BE/ESP teachers and entered into the ESL Carnival of BE/ ESP published on 1 November 2010. organized by Anne Hodgson for BESIG.


Questions and Answers
  • 1. 
    Spotlight: International EnglishIan McMaster's post looks at what international English really is and how useful native-speaker models are for learners. He highlights three essential problems with English as a lingua franca (ELF), including
    • A. 

      There aren't enough teachers to teach everyone English.

    • B. 

      ELF can't be taught, because it's the result, not the input.

    • C. 

      Native speakers have trouble understanding foreign dialects.

  • 2. 
    Spotlight: Sarah Palin's Shakespearean TweetsDeborah Capras says Sarah Palin is no Shakespeare, but the business community can still learn something from her tweets on Twitter. Analyzing Sarah Palin's 'new word', what does  Deborah say is necessary to create a genuine portmanteau?
    • A. 

      Combining any two words

    • B. 

      A gap in the language that makes a new word necessary

    • C. 

      A slip of the tongue by a famous person

  • 3. 
    English Raven: The best approach to exam prep is an unplugged oneIn this post Jason Renshaw presents three consecutive lessons that show that while the "unplugged" (or Dogme ELT) approach in combination with exam prep might sound like an unlikely and unholy union at first, it is actually a highly effective alliance.What did he do to make exam prep classes effective?
    • A. 

      He banned books and materials and made the students speak more.

    • B. 

      He did not allow any technology, not to distract from speaking.

    • C. 

      He alligned student generated content to the test question format.

  • 4. 
    For ESP to work, keep it realVirginia Allum maintains that teachers of ESP require a knowledge of technical content so that their students can practise with authentic materials which will ensure that students are industry-ready and confident when they leave the classroom.Which of the following does Virginia Allum consider essential in ESP?
    • A. 

      Learners need authentic workplace dialogues

    • B. 

      They must have specific intercultural skills

    • C. 

      They need a high level of general, everyday fluency

  • 5. 
    Is there such as a thing as "general principles for the teaching of ESP"?Nick Robinson presents some initial thoughts on the ground rules for successful ESP teaching across all fields.What does he say should form the basis for choosing materials to teach ESP?
    • A. 

      The student's level of English and experience learning the language.

    • B. 

      The student's 'web of relationships'.

    • C. 

      The work-related materials the student can bring along.

  • 6. 
    Kalinago English: Wiki that company!Karenne Sylvester's blogpost for teachers shows how to spark a meaningful, workplace-related conversation with a group of adult Business English students who all work for the same company, by playing a very simple game requiring zero prep on your part and few materials. How does she have students produce language in her game 'Wiki that company!' ?
    • A. 

      Orally, face to face

    • B. 

      In an online text chat (can be in the same room)

    • C. 

      In writing, creating a wiki (can be in the same room)

  • 7. 
    Aleksandra Luczak's blog Business and Legal English Blog for N.E.Body contains links to materials and references to projects, while her second blog English for Polish Students of Law is a collection of her own articles and annotated excerpts from news sources to trigger and develop her students' discussion skills.What surprising area did she blog about incorporating into her teaching in October?
    • A. 

      Law in literature

    • B. 

      Law in poetry

    • C. 

      Law in songs

  • 8. 
    OUP ELT Global: What was the question?In this article and video, Sam McCarter, author of 'Medicine 1' and '2', considers the importance of clinical communication skills.What does he say is essential for a doctor to recognize in order to ask good questions?
    • A. 

      The fact that the patient may not speak perfect English

    • B. 

      That the patient may not be telling him/her everything

    • C. 

      Non-verbal elements in the patient's response

  • 9. 
    OUP ELT Global: Take time to teach negotiatingJohn Hughes, author of 'Business Result', has advice on the importance of negotiation skills and language for Business English learners. (For more, see his blog Training ELTeachers)Not allowing plenty of time during a lesson on negotiating causes things to go wrong, John Hughes says, because students
    • A. 

      Need time to overcome their shyness

    • B. 

      Need to think about their role

    • C. 

      Need to practice the necessary phrases

  • 10. 
    OUP ELT Global: Activities for techiesVicki Hollett, author of the 'Tech Talk' series, gives her thoughts on the types of activities that work for Technical English students, and gives you a few to try out.What does she say sets the techie learner apart from the general business English student?
    • A. 

      They have to learn much more vocabulary.

    • B. 

      They prefer fixing and solving problems.

    • C. 

      They need to learn with a concrete purpose.

  • 11. 
    Learning to speak 'merican: Got any time to spare?In this post on her blog, BE and ESP writer Vicki Hollett introduces trainer Marshall Goldsmith presenting an activity for developing skills in giving (and receiving) feedback.It is very applicable in BE training, or any kind of training, really, and is called
    • A. 

      Feed-up

    • B. 

      Feed-down

    • C. 

      Feed-forward

  • 12. 
    Candy van Olst: Is THIS dogme, perhaps?Candy van Olst describes an early job of teaching "survival English" to a group of refugees in Africa... with "nothing but students and me". What made them learn English? She says it was
    • A. 

      The basic human need to communicate through language.

    • B. 

      The need to have practical language skills.

    • C. 

      The ability to focus on an objective learning target.

  • 13. 
    Compelling Conversations: Have You Added Informational Interviews to Your Advanced ESL Class Yet?Eric Roth advocates using informational interviews in Advanced English classes, and details the many advantages for students looking to expand their social network and business English skills.But what exactly are "informational interviews"?
    • A. 

      Interviews with job seekers.

    • B. 

      Interviews used for a survey or study.

    • C. 

      Interviews to get an idea of an occupation.

  • 14. 
    TEFLtastic: Getting Away with Games in Business English ClassesIn this post on his popular blog, Alex Case explains "how to use fun stuff if you want to, even if they are convinced they don't."    What is his fall back strategy if business students don't want to play a game?
    • A. 

      He makes them do it anyway.

    • B. 

      He has a less game-like variation to fall back on.

    • C. 

      He begs them to do it. If they don't like it, they'll never have to do it again.

  • 15. 
    Goodopenenglish: Creative Writing for English learnersStewart Tunnicliff details three simple creative writing tasks for English learners in BE/ESP, to collect as portfolio mementos.How does he feel about the teacher or a native speaker, or other students editing a student's work?
    • A. 

      He says he doesn't try to interfere too much.

    • B. 

      He suggests peer and native speaker editing at given points in the process.

    • C. 

      He doesn't mention editing at all.

  • 16. 
    English for the Workplace: On teaching the language of meetingsEvan Frendo shares some thoughts about how we help our learners operate more effectively when they have to use English in meetings.    He says our biggest difficulty is that "we ourselves are not members of the discourse communities which our learners are trying to become full members of." To give us the information we need, he specifically suggests
    • A. 

      Asking students to film or record their actual meetings

    • B. 

      Having learners replay past meetings

    • C. 

      Anecdote circles, a structured way of relating experience

  • 17. 
    The PLN Staff Lounge: When Good Workplaces Go Bad Sue Lyon-Jones, who runs the free English Language lessons website ESOL Courses, contributes a modern day fable set in a corporate workplace.In the fable, who falls victim to bureaucracy?
    • A. 

      The owl

    • B. 

      The ant

    • C. 

      The cicada

  • 18. 
    My integrating technology journey: My best websites to teach writingThis post is a list of links to sites that Jennifer Verschoor uses to teach teenage students to write.She says she really finds it difficult to motivate teenagers
    • A. 

      To write in class

    • B. 

      To write for homework

    • C. 

      To write emails

  • 19. 
    Techno Tool Tames Transcription TroubleMike Harrison's post is not connected to any specific type of English, but he's got an extremely handy tip if you're using online video to teach English, discovered by his students.Mike's tip revolves around
    • A. 

      Adding subtitles

    • B. 

      Downloading scripts

    • C. 

      Slowing down the video

  • 20. 
    Forever Teaching: Oh, I just don't know where to beginBetty Carlson lists the many TEFL issues she'll be dealing with in the coming months. Where outside the UK does she say many of her Twitter contacts are based in?
    • A. 

      France

    • B. 

      Germany

    • C. 

      Turkey

  • 21. 
    Teacher Reboot Camp: Goal Setting with a new classOUP ELT Global: Motivating Adult LearnersShelly Terrell's two entries are her blogpost on Goal Setting with a new class (with Wallwisher), and a guest post on the OUP ELT Global blog on Motivating Adult Learners (with Skype, including over 10 activities).What are the seating arrangements when she teaches using Skype?
    • A. 

      Everyone in the room has their own laptop and webcam.

    • B. 

      They are distance learners, at home with their own computers.

    • C. 

      Everyone sits together so they can see the screen and be seen.

  • 22. 
    Vicky Loras's Blog: Teaching Business English in SwitzerlandVicky Loras's post shows how she and her colleagues teach Business English lessons in companies and banks, starting off with conversation and incorporating role-play.What does Vicki leave on the board during the entire lesson?
    • A. 

      The agenda of the lesson

    • B. 

      The vocabulary that comes up

    • C. 

      An inspirational quote

  • 23. 
    PSA: Business English materials in the digital age: what's new?Pete Sharma announces what he'll be doing at BESIG. What does he say his position will be in the debate on Dogme, published materials and digital approaches on Sunday?
    • A. 

      He'll defend using the software approach.

    • B. 

      He'll introduce 'Dogme goes Digital'.

    • C. 

      Sorry, but he's given up on software.

  • 24. 
    Delta Publishing: Teaching Online 5: Five steps to becoming a (good) online tutorNicky Hockly has posted a guest blog that tells you, step-by-step, how to start teaching online. As many business English teachers would like to start to offer online or blended options, this general introduction could be useful. (See her own blog, e-moderation station, for deeper discussions of online teaching methodology.)How does she say you should start out?
    • A. 

      Select 20% of your syllabus and create a short pilot course out of it.

    • B. 

      Take an online course yourself to gain the experience of a learner

    • C. 

      Get hard (tech) skills training to be able to handle the platforms.