English I Final

32 Questions | Total Attempts: 23

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English I Final

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Questions and Answers
  • 1. 
    What happens in a short story, novel, or play is the 
    • A. 

      Setting

    • B. 

      Mood

    • C. 

      Theme

    • D. 

      Plot

    • E. 

      Climax

  • 2. 
    The problem is called the
    • A. 

      Resolution

    • B. 

      Conflict

    • C. 

      Plot

    • D. 

      Climax

    • E. 

      Inference

  • 3. 
    The time and place of a story, play, or narrative poem is called
    • A. 

      Point of view

    • B. 

      Resolution

    • C. 

      Climax

    • D. 

      Theme

    • E. 

      Setting

  • 4. 
    The final part of the story in which the conflict is resolved and the story is brought to a close is called 
    • A. 

      Resolution

    • B. 

      Setting

    • C. 

      First-person

    • D. 

      Omniscient

    • E. 

      Mood

  • 5. 
    The general idea or insight about life that a work of literature reveals is called
    • A. 

      Mood

    • B. 

      Theme

    • C. 

      Resolution

    • D. 

      Point of view

    • E. 

      Setting

  • 6. 
    The use of clues or hints to suggest events that will occur later in the plot.
    • A. 

      Climax

    • B. 

      Resolution

    • C. 

      Mood

    • D. 

      Theme

    • E. 

      Foreshadowing

  • 7. 
    When one of the characters, using the personal pronoun I, tells the story. 
    • A. 

      Third person limited

    • B. 

      Omniscient

    • C. 

      First person

    • D. 

      Point of view

    • E. 

      Setting

  • 8. 
    A short,  fictional prose narrative is called a 
    • A. 

      Short story

    • B. 

      Climax

    • C. 

      Plot

    • D. 

      Theme

    • E. 

      Foreshadowing

  • 9. 
    The overall  feeling of a work of literature  is called
    • A. 

      Theme

    • B. 

      Mood

    • C. 

      Setting

    • D. 

      Inference

    • E. 

      Climax

  • 10. 
    The word for a  person or an animal in a story, a play, or another literary work.
    • A. 

      Setting

    • B. 

      Plot

    • C. 

      First person

    • D. 

      Mood

    • E. 

      Character

  • 11. 
    The most exciting moment in the story, when the outcome is decided one way or another is called 
    • A. 

      Short story

    • B. 

      Conflict

    • C. 

      Mood

    • D. 

      Climax

    • E. 

      Setting

  • 12. 
    When you take new information, add it to something you already know, and make an educated guess about what’s going on you are making a(n)
    • A. 

      Inference

    • B. 

      Point of view

    • C. 

      Climax

    • D. 

      Plot

    • E. 

      Setting

  • 13. 
    The type of point of view in a story where the narrator focuses on the thoughts and  feelings of only one character.
    • A. 

      Omniscient

    • B. 

      Third person limited

    • C. 

      First person

    • D. 

      Point of view

    • E. 

      Inference

  • 14. 
    A word that means all knowing is
    • A. 

      Foreshadowing

    • B. 

      Character

    • C. 

      Omniscient

    • D. 

      Climax

    • E. 

      Setting

  • 15. 
    A story that presents events in the time sequence in which they occured one right after the other is called
    • A. 

      Chronological order

    • B. 

      Plot

    • C. 

      Third-person limited

    • D. 

      Conflict

    • E. 

      Foreshadowing

  • 16. 
    The vantage point from which a story is told is 
    • A. 

      Chronological order

    • B. 

      Point of view

    • C. 

      Plot

    • D. 

      Conflict

    • E. 

      Inference

  • 17. 
    A word that imitates the sound it represents.
    • A. 

      Imagery

    • B. 

      Symbol

    • C. 

      Alliteration

    • D. 

      Onomatopoeia

  • 18. 
    An exaggeration or overstatement.
    • A. 

      Paradox

    • B. 

      Symbol

    • C. 

      Hyperbole

    • D. 

      Idiom

  • 19. 
    A comparison of two unlike things by stating that one is another, and not using like or as.
    • A. 

      Simile

    • B. 

      Metaphor

    • C. 

      Alliteration

    • D. 

      Symbol

  • 20. 
    The comparison of two unlike things using like or as.
    • A. 

      Metaphor

    • B. 

      Simile

    • C. 

      Allusion

    • D. 

      Personification

  • 21. 
    Two opposing ideas that reveal a kind of truth which at first seems contradictory but are nonetheless true.
    • A. 

      Metaphor

    • B. 

      Onomatopoeia

    • C. 

      Paradox

    • D. 

      Idiom

  • 22. 
    A brief reference to a person, event, or place, real or ficticious, or to a work of art. Casual reference to a famous historical or literary figure or event. May be drawn from history, geography, literature, or religion.
    • A. 

      Idiom

    • B. 

      Allusion

    • C. 

      Paradox

    • D. 

      Simile

  • 23. 
    Language that evokes one or all of the five senses: seeing, hearing, tasting, smelling, touching.
    • A. 

      Idiom

    • B. 

      Symbolism

    • C. 

      Overstatement

    • D. 

      Imagery

  • 24. 
    Using an object or action that means something more than its literal meaning.
    • A. 

      Irony

    • B. 

      Overstatement

    • C. 

      Allusion

    • D. 

      Symbol

  • 25. 
    An implied discrepancy between what is said and what is meant.
    • A. 

      Hyperbole

    • B. 

      Idiom

    • C. 

      Paradox

    • D. 

      Irony