Edf1005 Quiz 4

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Reading Quizzes & Trivia

Test on Chapter 4 and weekly readings


Questions and Answers
  • 1. 
    Magnet schools
    • A. 

      Science, math, history, English, foreign language

    • B. 

      Offer unique educational programs in such areas as technology or arts

    • C. 

      A study and a book that explore school practices and the purposes of schooling

    • D. 

      Students not required to attend closest public school

    • E. 

      Report showing reading gains for low-scoring students

  • 2. 
    Magnet schools
    • A. 

      Science, math, history, English, foreign language

    • B. 

      Offer unique educational programs in such areas as technology or arts

    • C. 

      A study and a book that explore school practices and the purposes of schooling

    • D. 

      Students not required to attend closest public school

    • E. 

      Report showing reading gains for low-scoring students

  • 3. 
    A Place Called School
    • A. 

      Science, math, history, English, foreign language

    • B. 

      English, social science, computer science, math, science

    • C. 

      A study and a book that explore school practices and the purposes of schooling

    • D. 

      Students not required to attend closest public school

    • E. 

      Allows for open enrollment, vouchers, and charter schools

  • 4. 
    A Place Called School
    • A. 

      Science, math, history, English, foreign language

    • B. 

      English, social science, computer science, math, science

    • C. 

      A study and a book that explore school practices and the purposes of schooling

    • D. 

      Students not required to attend closest public school

    • E. 

      Allows for open enrollment, vouchers, and charter schools

  • 5. 
    Edison Schools
    • A. 

      Students not required to attend closest public school

    • B. 

      Students not required to attend closest public school

    • C. 

      Involvement of for-profit companies in education

    • D. 

      Chris Whittle’s private-enterprise attempt to reform schools

    • E. 

      Science, math, history, English, foreign language

  • 6. 
    Edison Schools
    • A. 

      Students not required to attend closest public school

    • B. 

      Students not required to attend closest public school

    • C. 

      Involvement of for-profit companies in education

    • D. 

      Chris Whittle’s private-enterprise attempt to reform schools

    • E. 

      Science, math, history, English, foreign language

  • 7. 
    “five new basics”
    • A. 

      Report that criticized “cafeteria-style curriculum” and called for “five new basics”

    • B. 

      Report showing reading gains for low-scoring students

    • C. 

      Viewed schools as the center of a network of social service agencies

    • D. 

      English, social science, computer science, math, science

    • E. 

      Allows for open enrollment, vouchers, and charter schools

  • 8. 
    “five new basics”
    • A. 

      Report that criticized “cafeteria-style curriculum” and called for “five new basics”

    • B. 

      Report showing reading gains for low-scoring students

    • C. 

      Viewed schools as the center of a network of social service agencies

    • D. 

      English, social science, computer science, math, science

    • E. 

      Allows for open enrollment, vouchers, and charter schools

  • 9. 
    A Nation at Risk
    • A. 

      Report showing reading gains for low-scoring students

    • B. 

      Chris Whittle’s private-enterprise attempt to reform schools

    • C. 

      Viewed schools as the center of a network of social service agencies

    • D. 

      a law confirming that profits can be derived from public schooling

    • E. 

      Report that criticized “cafeteria-style curriculum” and called for “five new basics”

  • 10. 
    A Nation at Risk
    • A. 

      Report showing reading gains for low-scoring students

    • B. 

      Chris Whittle’s private-enterprise attempt to reform schools

    • C. 

      Viewed schools as the center of a network of social service agencies

    • D. 

      a law confirming that profits can be derived from public schooling

    • E. 

      Report that criticized “cafeteria-style curriculum” and called for “five new basics”

  • 11. 
    School choice
    • A. 

      . a law confirming that profits can be derived from public schooling

    • B. 

      Involvement of for-profit companies in education

    • C. 

      Allows public funding for religious education

    • D. 

      Allows for open enrollment, vouchers, and charter schools

    • E. 

      Viewed schools as the center of a network of social service agencies

  • 12. 
    School choice
    • A. 

      . a law confirming that profits can be derived from public schooling

    • B. 

      Involvement of for-profit companies in education

    • C. 

      Allows public funding for religious education

    • D. 

      Allows for open enrollment, vouchers, and charter schools

    • E. 

      Viewed schools as the center of a network of social service agencies

  • 13. 
    Zelman v. Simmons-Harris
    • A. 

      a law confirming that profits can be derived from public schooling

    • B. 

      Allows public funding for religious education

    • C. 

      Report that criticized “cafeteria-style curriculum” and called for “five new basics”

    • D. 

      Offer unique educational programs in such areas as technology or arts

    • E. 

      A study and a book that explore school practices and the purposes of schooling

  • 14. 
    Zelman v. Simmons-Harris
    • A. 

      a law confirming that profits can be derived from public schooling

    • B. 

      Allows public funding for religious education

    • C. 

      Report that criticized “cafeteria-style curriculum” and called for “five new basics”

    • D. 

      Offer unique educational programs in such areas as technology or arts

    • E. 

      A study and a book that explore school practices and the purposes of schooling

  • 15. 
    Third wave of school reform
    • A. 

      Chris Whittle’s private-enterprise attempt to reform schools

    • B. 

      A study and a book that explore school practices and the purposes of schooling

    • C. 

      Viewed schools as the center of a network of social service agencies

    • D. 

      Report that criticized “cafeteria-style curriculum” and called for “five new basics”

    • E. 

      a law confirming that profits can be derived from public schooling

  • 16. 
    Third wave of school reform
    • A. 

      Chris Whittle’s private-enterprise attempt to reform schools

    • B. 

      A study and a book that explore school practices and the purposes of schooling

    • C. 

      Viewed schools as the center of a network of social service agencies

    • D. 

      Report that criticized “cafeteria-style curriculum” and called for “five new basics”

    • E. 

      a law confirming that profits can be derived from public schooling

  • 17. 
    Privatization
    • A. 

      Allows public funding for religious education

    • B. 

      Offer unique educational programs in such areas as technology or arts

    • C. 

      Allows for open enrollment, vouchers, and charter schools

    • D. 

      Involvement of for-profit companies in education

    • E. 

      Viewed schools as the center of a network of social service agencies

  • 18. 
    Privatization
    • A. 

      Allows public funding for religious education

    • B. 

      Offer unique educational programs in such areas as technology or arts

    • C. 

      Allows for open enrollment, vouchers, and charter schools

    • D. 

      Involvement of for-profit companies in education

    • E. 

      Viewed schools as the center of a network of social service agencies

  • 19. 
    A state establishes “standards” that students must meet in order to graduate. The state is most likely focusing on which broad educational goal?
    • A. 

      Transmitting society’s knowledge and values

    • B. 

      Reconstructing society

    • C. 

      Developing individual talent and self-expression

    • D. 

      Developing strong self-esteem

  • 20. 
    A state establishes “standards” that students must meet in order to graduate. The state is most likely focusing on which broad educational goal?
    • A. 

      Transmitting society’s knowledge and values

    • B. 

      Reconstructing society

    • C. 

      Developing individual talent and self-expression

    • D. 

      Developing strong self-esteem

  • 21. 
    ) A colleague wants to learn more about economic reconstructionism. Which of the following would you recommend he or she read?
    • A. 

      Any of Milton Friedman’s early works

    • B. 

      The U.S. Department of Education’s A Nation at Risk

    • C. 

      Paulo Freire’s The Pedagogy of the Oppressed

    • D. 

      The Supreme Court case Lemon v. Kurtzman

  • 22. 
    ) A colleague wants to learn more about economic reconstructionism. Which of the following would you recommend he or she read?
    • A. 

      Any of Milton Friedman’s early works

    • B. 

      The U.S. Department of Education’s A Nation at Risk

    • C. 

      Paulo Freire’s The Pedagogy of the Oppressed

    • D. 

      The Supreme Court case Lemon v. Kurtzman

  • 23. 
    Someone in favor of a social action curriculum would rate which of the following goals for schools HIGHEST?
    • A. 

      To prepare workers to compete successfully in a technological world economy

    • B. 

      To transmit the nation’s cultural heritage, preserving past accomplishments and insights

    • C. 

      To educate students in avoiding social pitfalls: unwanted pregnancy, AIDS, drugs, and alcoholism

    • D. 

      To encourage students to question and reform current practices and institutions

  • 24. 
     An examination of the history of school reform movements in the U.S. reveals
    • A. 

      Little change in the basic goals for school over time

    • B. 

      A consistent emphasis on raising standards and improving academic performance

    • C. 

      A consistent emphasis on meeting the needs of diverse learners and raising self-esteem

    • D. 

      That school goals tend to change to reflect the nation’s ever-changing priorities

  • 25. 
    Someone in favor of a social action curriculum would rate which of the following goals for schools HIGHEST?
    • A. 

      To prepare workers to compete successfully in a technological world economy

    • B. 

      To transmit the nation’s cultural heritage, preserving past accomplishments and insights

    • C. 

      To educate students in avoiding social pitfalls: unwanted pregnancy, AIDS, drugs, and alcoholism

    • D. 

      To encourage students to question and reform current practices and institutions

  • 26. 
    What principle do Educational Maintenance Organizations follow?
    • A. 

      What principle do Educational Maintenance Organizations follow?

    • B. 

      Voucher systems threaten to undermine the shared fabric of American life.

    • C. 

      Profits can be realized by investing in education.

    • D. 

      Schools should become one-stop shops for children’s services.

  • 27. 
     An examination of the history of school reform movements in the U.S. reveals
    • A. 

      Little change in the basic goals for school over time

    • B. 

      A consistent emphasis on raising standards and improving academic performance

    • C. 

      A consistent emphasis on meeting the needs of diverse learners and raising self-esteem

    • D. 

      That school goals tend to change to reflect the nation’s ever-changing priorities

  • 28. 
    What principle do Educational Maintenance Organizations follow?
    • A. 

      What principle do Educational Maintenance Organizations follow?

    • B. 

      Voucher systems threaten to undermine the shared fabric of American life.

    • C. 

      Profits can be realized by investing in education.

    • D. 

      Schools should become one-stop shops for children’s services.

  • 29. 
    In Lemon v. Kurtzman, the Supreme Court established criteria to
    • A. 

      Limit the extent of privatization of schools

    • B. 

      Determine the legality of government funds used in religious schools

    • C. 

      Promote effective charter schools in urban areas

    • D. 

      Regulate the explosive growth of home schooling

  • 30. 
    Charter schools typically enjoy
    • A. 

      Total freedom from state regulations

    • B. 

      Permission to operate for a fixed length of time

    • C. 

      The advantage of being able to administer admissions tests

    • D. 

      State-of-the-art facilities

  • 31. 
    In Lemon v. Kurtzman, the Supreme Court established criteria to
    • A. 

      Limit the extent of privatization of schools

    • B. 

      Determine the legality of government funds used in religious schools

    • C. 

      Promote effective charter schools in urban areas

    • D. 

      Regulate the explosive growth of home schooling

  • 32. 
    The neighborhood public school is
    • A. 

      Stronger than ever as a result of spectacular gains on standardized tests and the focus on greater accountability

    • B. 

      In competition with magnet schools, charter schools, and even for-profit schools

    • C. 

      Criticized by Jonathan Kozol, who believes we’ve given neighborhood schools every chance to perform

    • D. 

      Threatened most by a rise in home schooling

  • 33. 
    Charter schools typically enjoy
    • A. 

      Total freedom from state regulations

    • B. 

      Permission to operate for a fixed length of time

    • C. 

      The advantage of being able to administer admissions tests

    • D. 

      State-of-the-art facilities

  • 34. 
    The neighborhood public school is
    • A. 

      Stronger than ever as a result of spectacular gains on standardized tests and the focus on greater accountability

    • B. 

      In competition with magnet schools, charter schools, and even for-profit schools

    • C. 

      Criticized by Jonathan Kozol, who believes we’ve given neighborhood schools every chance to perform

    • D. 

      Threatened most by a rise in home schooling

  • 35. 
    • A. 

      Tokens of Uruk

    • B. 

      Impressed tablet from Susa

    • C. 

      Envelope with tokens

    • D. 

      Cuneiform tablet from Umma

  • 36. 
    • A. 

      Envelope with tokens

    • B. 

      Tokens of Uruk

    • C. 

      Cuneiform tablet from Umma

    • D. 

      Impressed tablet from Susa

  • 37. 
    • A. 

      Tokens of Uruk

    • B. 

      Impressed tablet from Susa

    • C. 

      Envelope with tokens

    • D. 

      Cuneiform tablet from Umma

  • 38. 
    • A. 

      Envelope with markings from Susa

    • B. 

      Tokens of Uruk

    • C. 

      Envelope with tokens

    • D. 

      Cuneiform tablet from Umma

  • 39. 
    • A. 

      Envelope with tokens

    • B. 

      Tokens of Uruk

    • C. 

      Cuneiform tablet from Umma

    • D. 

      Impressed tablet from Susa

  • 40. 
    • A. 

      Envelope with tokens

    • B. 

      Envelope with markings from Susa

    • C. 

      Cuneiform tablet from Umma

    • D. 

      Tokens of Uruk

  • 41. 
    • A. 

      Envelope with markings from Susa

    • B. 

      Tokens of Uruk

    • C. 

      Envelope with tokens

    • D. 

      Cuneiform tablet from Umma

  • 42. 
    • A. 

      Envelope with tokens

    • B. 

      Tokens of Uruk

    • C. 

      Cuneiform tablet from Umma

    • D. 

      Envelope with markings from Susa

  • 43. 
    • A. 

      Envelope with tokens

    • B. 

      Envelope with markings from Susa

    • C. 

      Cuneiform tablet from Umma

    • D. 

      Tokens of Uruk

  • 44. 
    According to Catherine Harris, the Egyptians invariably used Papyrus until the 9th-11th centuries, that is, for ________years.
    • A. 

      10,000

    • B. 

      4000

    • C. 

      1000

    • D. 

      500

  • 45. 
    • A. 

      Envelope with tokens

    • B. 

      Tokens of Uruk

    • C. 

      Cuneiform tablet from Umma

    • D. 

      Envelope with markings from Susa

  • 46. 
    According to Catherine Harris, children destined to be scribes were sent to formal school at the age of ________ and left the school at the age of _________ to begin work.
    • A. 

      6-7:15

    • B. 

      12: 18

    • C. 

      11/12: 16

    • D. 

      9:12

    • E. 

      None of these

  • 47. 
    According to Catherine Harris, the Egyptians invariably used Papyrus until the 9th-11th centuries, that is, for ________years.
    • A. 

      10,000

    • B. 

      4000

    • C. 

      1000

    • D. 

      500

  • 48. 
    According to Catherine Harris, "___________ is what Egyptian scribes were taught, a series of brush strokes to express thoughts and reach eternity.
    • A. 

      Caligraphy

    • B. 

      Cuneiform

    • C. 

      Heiratic

    • D. 

      Sanskrit

  • 49. 
    According to Catherine Harris, children destined to be scribes were sent to formal school at the age of ________ and left the school at the age of _________ to begin work.
    • A. 

      6-7:15

    • B. 

      12: 18

    • C. 

      11/12: 16

    • D. 

      9:12

    • E. 

      None of these

  • 50. 
    Mesopotamian schools for scribes, students began their study with a simple syllabary to learn how to write the basic sounds of the language comparable to our abc's.
    • A. 

      True

    • B. 

      False

  • 51. 
    Which of the following, according to Douglas Frayne, were not a part of the curriculum of the Sumero-Akkadian Scribal school?
    • A. 

      Syllable lists

    • B. 

      Cuneiform signs

    • C. 

      The hubullu, an inventory of material culture

    • D. 

      Music

    • E. 

      All of the above are a part of the curriculum

  • 52. 
    According to Catherine Harris, "___________ is what Egyptian scribes were taught, a series of brush strokes to express thoughts and reach eternity.
    • A. 

      Caligraphy

    • B. 

      Cuneiform

    • C. 

      Heiratic

    • D. 

      Sanskrit

  • 53. 
    In Mesopotamian schools for scribes, students regardless of social position were able to receive training as scribes.
    • A. 

      True

    • B. 

      False

  • 54. 
    Mesopotamian schools for scribes, students began their study with a simple syllabary to learn how to write the basic sounds of the language comparable to our abc's.
    • A. 

      True

    • B. 

      False

  • 55. 
    In Ancient Egypt,young men usually choose their own careers, with the blessing of the king, of course.
    • A. 

      True

    • B. 

      False

  • 56. 
    Which of the following, according to Douglas Frayne, were not a part of the curriculum of the Sumero-Akkadian Scribal school?
    • A. 

      Syllable lists

    • B. 

      Cuneiform signs

    • C. 

      The hubullu, an inventory of material culture

    • D. 

      Music

    • E. 

      All of the above are a part of the curriculum

  • 57. 
    Girls from less lofty families learned at home how to manage a household, and how to sing, dance and play musical instruments. These last would be important if the girl took on temple service as a singer or musician.
    • A. 

      True

    • B. 

      False

  • 58. 
    In Ancient Mesopotamia,the center of intellectual activity and training was the_______________, which was usually housed in a temple under the supervision of influential priests.
    • A. 

      Hypostyle

    • B. 

      Ziggurat

    • C. 

      Antechamber

    • D. 

      Library

  • 59. 
    In Mesopotamian schools for scribes, students regardless of social position were able to receive training as scribes.
    • A. 

      True

    • B. 

      False

  • 60. 
    "If an artisan take a son for adoption and teach him his handicraft, one may not bring claim for him. If he does not teach him his handicraft, that adopted son may return to his father's house." This is a a quotation from _______________
    • A. 

      Epic of Gilgamesh

    • B. 

      The Book of the Dead

    • C. 

      Books of Instruction

    • D. 

      Hammarabi's Code

  • 61. 
    In Ancient Egypt,young men usually choose their own careers, with the blessing of the king, of course.
    • A. 

      True

    • B. 

      False

  • 62. 
    Girls from less lofty families learned at home how to manage a household, and how to sing, dance and play musical instruments. These last would be important if the girl took on temple service as a singer or musician.
    • A. 

      True

    • B. 

      False

  • 63. 
    In Ancient Mesopotamia, formal education was practical and aimed to train scribes and priests. It was extended from basic reading, writing, and religion to higher learning in law, medicine, and astrology.
    • A. 

      True

    • B. 

      False

  • 64. 
    In Ancient Mesopotamia,the center of intellectual activity and training was the_______________, which was usually housed in a temple under the supervision of influential priests.
    • A. 

      Hypostyle

    • B. 

      Ziggurat

    • C. 

      Antechamber

    • D. 

      Library

  • 65. 
    "If an artisan take a son for adoption and teach him his handicraft, one may not bring claim for him. If he does not teach him his handicraft, that adopted son may return to his father's house." This is a a quotation from _______________
    • A. 

      Epic of Gilgamesh

    • B. 

      The Book of the Dead

    • C. 

      Books of Instruction

    • D. 

      Hammarabi's Code

  • 66. 
    In Ancient Mesopotamia, formal education was practical and aimed to train scribes and priests. It was extended from basic reading, writing, and religion to higher learning in law, medicine, and astrology.
    • A. 

      True

    • B. 

      False