Edf1005 Quiz 11

50 Questions

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Education Quizzes & Trivia

Quiz on the readings for weeks eleven, twelve and thirteen


Questions and Answers
  • 1. 
    "The two most influential groups in the United States who continue to favor this approach to education are some leaders in parochial education and those liberal arts professors who are under the influence of faculty psychology and the classical tradition. " This statement belongs to which of the following approaches to teaching/learning
    • A. 

      Mental discipline

    • B. 

      Natural unfoldment

    • C. 

      Apperception

  • 2. 
    "...teachers may deliberately keep their assignments difficult and may use some force if necessary to ensure that students complete them." This statement belongs to which of the following approaches to teaching/learning
    • A. 

      Mental discipline

    • B. 

      Natural unfoldment

    • C. 

      Apperception

  • 3. 
    "...schoolwork is better for a child if it is somewhat distasteful. " This statement belongs to which of the following approaches to teaching/learning
    • A. 

      Mental discipline

    • B. 

      Natural unfoldment

    • C. 

      Apperception

  • 4. 
    "...knowledge assumes the character of a fixed body of true principles, handed down as a heritage of humankind. " This statement belongs to which of the following approaches to teaching/learning
    • A. 

      Mental discipline

    • B. 

      Natural unfoldment

    • C. 

      Apperception

  • 5. 
      "...if a person pursues any type of unpleasant work long enough, the person's will will be strengthened. " This statement belongs to which of the following approaches to teaching/learning
    • A. 

      Mental discipline

    • B. 

      Natural unfoldment

    • C. 

      Apperception

  • 6. 
    "A human mind is assumed to be of such nature that, with adequate cultivation, it can know the world as it really is. " This statement belongs to which of the following approaches to teaching/learning
    • A. 

      Mental discipline

    • B. 

      Natural unfoldment

    • C. 

      Apperception

  • 7. 
    " If human nature is intrinsically evil, then a strongly developed will is necessary to harness its inherent evil. Will, in the sense in which it is employed here, refers to ability to implement, or put into effective practice, a decision that has been made." This statement belongs to which of the following approaches to teaching/learning
    • A. 

      Mental discipline

    • B. 

      Natural unfoldment

    • C. 

      Apperception

  • 8. 
    "The knowing faculty is divided into several others, which include perception, imagination, memory, and pure reason. The reasoning faculty is the ability to draw distinctions and form judgments. " This statement belongs to which of the following approaches to teaching/learning
    • A. 

      Mental discipline

    • B. 

      Natural unfoldment

    • C. 

      Apperception

  • 9. 
    The theory that people are naturally good and at the same time active in relation to their environments. All people are assumed to be free, autonomous, and forwardly active persons who are reaching out from themselves to make their worlds.Unless and until they are corrupted by some outside influences, every act that comes from them will be good.Each student is subjectively free, and each student's own choice and responsibility account for his or her life. That person, and that person alone, is the architect and builder of that life.
    • A. 

      Mental discipline

    • B. 

      Natural unfoldment

    • C. 

      Apperception

  • 10. 
    Children must not only develop their intellects, but their hearts and hands as well. Our learning materials not only help children learn to read, write, and think, but also to paint, draw, write poetry, play music, build things and learn through experience. In later grades students are encouraged to become involved in their communities, to develop a talent, to be of service to others, and to develop self-empowerment and leadership skills.
    • A. 

      Mental discipline

    • B. 

      Natural unfoldment

    • C. 

      Apperception

  • 11. 
    Like the seed that eventually becomes a flower, children develop in stages, each of which requires a unique learning approach. Because younger children learn through doing, our curriculum features lots of activity and movement. Later, children develop through their feelings and therefore need the emotional and social context to learning that our approach offers. The final stage of intellectual unfoldment can only flourish upon the foundation of these earlier stages.
    • A. 

      Mental discipline

    • B. 

      Natural unfoldment

    • C. 

      Apperception

  • 12. 
    Children learn in a variety of ways. Some learn best by doing, others by listening, still others by seeing or reading. All of these ways are valid and effective. The Oak Meadow curriculum offers students choices of exercises geared towards different learning styles, thereby helping children to experience ease and joy throughout their school years. We've also helped many "differently-abled" children excel when they are given the structure that supports their individual learning styles.
    • A. 

      Mental discipline

    • B. 

      Natural unfoldment

    • C. 

      Apperception

  • 13. 
      "Each student is subjectively free, and each student's own choice and responsibility account for his or her life. That person, and that person alone, is the architect and builder of that life. " This statement belongs to which of the following approaches to teaching/learning
    • A. 

      Mental discipline

    • B. 

      Natural unfoldment

    • C. 

      Apperception

  • 14. 
    " Early development of this point of view usually is associated with Jean J. Rousseau (1712-1778). Later, the Swiss educational reformer Heinrich Pestalozzi (174~1827) and the German philosopher, educator, and founder of the kindergarten movement Friedrich Froebel (1782-1852), to a large degree used this outlook as a basis for their pedagogical thinking. " This statement belongs to which of the following approaches to teaching/learning
    • A. 

      Mental discipline

    • B. 

      Natural unfoldment

    • C. 

      Apperception

  • 15. 
    "This outlook on the nature of learning stems logically from the theory that people are assumed to be free, autonomous, and forwardly active persons who are reaching out from themselves to make their worlds " This statement belongs to which of the following approaches to teaching/learning
    • A. 

      Mental discipline

    • B. 

      Natural unfoldment

    • C. 

      Apperception

  • 16. 
    "learning is little more than a process of growth and development in accordance with the genetic patterns of individuals." This statement belongs to which of the following approaches to teaching/learning
    • A. 

      Mental discipline

    • B. 

      Natural unfoldment

    • C. 

      Apperception

  • 17. 
     "This outlook on the nature of learning stems logically from the theory that people are naturally good and at the same time active in relation to their environments. " This statement belongs to which of the following approaches to teaching/learning
    • A. 

      Mental discipline

    • B. 

      Natural unfoldment

    • C. 

      Apperception

  • 18. 
    "Since children grow up unfolding what nature has enfolded within them, devotees of this position tend to place great emphasis on the study of child growth and development and to minimize the study of learning" This statement belongs to which of the following approaches to teaching/learning
    • A. 

      Mental discipline

    • B. 

      Natural unfoldment

    • C. 

      Apperception

  • 19. 
    "ideas, not persons, are dynamic. Persons are passive containers within which laws of mental chemistry operate." This statement belongs to which of the following approaches to teaching/learning.
    • A. 

      Mental discipline

    • B. 

      Natural unfoldment

    • C. 

      Apperception

  • 20. 
    "This outlook on the nature of learning is a dynamic mental associationism based upon the fundamental premise that there are no innate ideas and everything one knows comes to one from outside oneself." This statement belongs to which of the following approaches to teaching/learning
    • A. 

      Mental discipline

    • B. 

      Natural unfoldment

    • C. 

      Apperception

  • 21. 
    "Understanding occurs when the common, or shared, attributes of a series of ideas make themselves seen. It involves generalization-deriving rules, principles, or laws from a group of specifics." This statement belongs to which of the following approaches to teaching/learning
    • A. 

      Mental discipline

    • B. 

      Natural unfoldment

    • C. 

      Apperception

  • 22. 
    "If a teacher builds up the right sequence of the right conduct follows. Hence, the real work of instruction is implantation not only of knowledge but also of inner volitions or will by means of presented ideas. Psychologically, students' mentalities are determined by the kind of ideas that are presented to them from without." This statement belongs to which of the following approaches to teaching/learning
    • A. 

      Mental discipline

    • B. 

      Natural unfoldment

    • C. 

      Apperception

  • 23. 
    "every mental state has an inherent quality, giving it an affinity for certain other mental states and an aversion for some others; respective ideas either attract or repel one another. Whereas the ideas of "book" and "school" would have an affinity and attract each other, the ideas of "book" and "fishing rod" would have a repugnancy and repel one another." This statement belongs to which of the following approaches to teaching/learning.
    • A. 

      Mental discipline

    • B. 

      Natural unfoldment

    • C. 

      Apperception

  • 24. 
    "Each idea in the mind of a person has once been in the center of the person's consciousness and strives to return, seeking self-preservation. Furthermore, it tries to enter into relations with other ideas." This statement belongs to which of the following approaches to teaching/learning.
    • A. 

      Mental discipline

    • B. 

      Natural unfoldment

    • C. 

      Apperception

  • 25. 
    " Until a first presentation occurs, there is nothing whatever present in a mind; except for its inherent receptivity, it is completely passive." This statement belongs to which of the following approaches to teaching/learning.
    • A. 

      Mental discipline

    • B. 

      Natural unfoldment

    • C. 

      Apperception

  • 26. 
    "In this outlook on the nature of learning, mind is wholly a matter of content -- a compound of elemental impressions bound together by association and formed when subject matter is presented from without and makes certain associations or connections with prior content of the mind." This statement belongs to which of the following approaches to teaching/learning.
    • A. 

      Mental discipline

    • B. 

      Natural unfoldment

    • C. 

      Apperception

  • 27. 
    "right thinking will produce right action; volition or willing has its roots in thought." This statement belongs to which of the following approaches to teaching/learning
    • A. 

      Mental discipline

    • B. 

      Natural unfoldment

    • C. 

      Apperception

  • 28. 
    _______________believed that childhood is unlike adulthood and those differences should be allowed and encouraged. Children should not be expected to take on adult responsibilities or forced to live by adult standards.
    • A. 

      Herbart

    • B. 

      Pestalozzi

    • C. 

      Froebel

    • D. 

      Rousseau

  • 29. 
    _______________"This educator believed that without love...' neither the physical not the intellectual powers will develop naturally'.
    • A. 

      Herbart

    • B. 

      Pestalozzi

    • C. 

      Froebel

    • D. 

      Rousseau

  • 30. 
    ______________"This educator thought that a mind had no innate natural faculties or talents whatsoever for receiving or producing ideas and that not even any remote dispositions toward perception. thought, willing or action lay within it."
    • A. 

      Herbart

    • B. 

      Pestalozzi

    • C. 

      Froebel

    • D. 

      Rousseau

  • 31. 
    _______________"This educator believed that the complete harmony between the developed human faculties and external nature was the great purpose of human existence."
    • A. 

      Herbart

    • B. 

      Pestalozzi

    • C. 

      Froebel

    • D. 

      Rousseau

  • 32. 
    _______________urged teachers to permit students to live close to nature so that they might indulge freely in their natural impulses, instincts, and feelings
  • 33. 
    Before Pestalozzi, it was ______________________________ who believed that in motivating children we should rely on natural curiosity, not force.
  • 34. 
    _______________"This educator is a classic example of the 'reflective practitioner'. He is concerned with action, with experimentation and yet, at the same time, he is committed to observation and reflection, and to trying to make sense of experiences and situations. ."
  • 35. 
    _______________"This educator developed the doctrine of Anschauung - direct concrete observation."
  • 36. 
      _______________"This educator believed strove to combat the tyranny of method and 'correctness'. It is ironical that his approach should become known as a method; and that observers attempted to systematize his thought."
  • 37. 
      _______________"This educator believed that a mind was an aggregate not of faculties, but of ideas or mental states.."
  • 38. 
    _______________"This educator believed that the learning process proceeds through an ordered series of steps that a teacher should understand and follow. Accordingly, effective teaching requires that regardless of obstacles, the proper succession of steps be pursued
  • 39. 
    _______________"This educator introduced the idea of threshold of consciousness."
  • 40. 
    _______________"This educator regarded all perception is apperception; it is a process of new ideas relating themselves to the store of old mental states."
  • 41. 
    _______________"Through the use of the concepts presentations, mental states, apperception, and apperceptive mass, this educator expanded the notion of a mind's neutral passivity into a systematic theory of learning and teaching."
  • 42. 
    _______________"This educator believed that the complete harmony between the developed human faculties and external nature was the great purpose of human existence."
  • 43. 
      _______________"This educator attended the training institute run by Johan Pestalozzi at Yverdon from 1808 to 1810. He left the institution accepting the basic principles of Pestalozzi's theory: permissive school atmosphere, emphasis on nature, and the object lesson. He went on to invent the "child's Garden" or kindergarten
  • 44. 
    _______________"This educator let children represent their observations objectively and certainly, not only by imitation but freely by remembrance, which thereby prepared them for inventive activity."
  • 45. 
    _______________"This educator's method proposed to banish all that is merely mechanical, and offer the means of methodically exercising the limbs and senses in every productive work...children are thereby elevated to productive activity in the full sense of the word, and artistic conception will be prepared for wherever the inborn capacity for it exists."
  • 46. 
    _______________"This educator believed that children need to have play time in order to learn..
  • 47. 
    ___________emphasized nature and the natural way of doing things. Education should occur in a natural rather than artificial environment and should be a natural outgrowth of the child's development rather than a set of contrived experiences
  • 48. 
    An _________________is any general psychological concept within which it is assumed that the process of learning is one of combining irreducible elements and that, in recall, we connect ideas or actions simply because they were connected in our earlier experiences with them.
  • 49. 
      _______________"This educator believed strove to combat the tyranny of method and 'correctness'. It is ironical that his approach should become known as a method; and that observers attempted to systematize his thought."
  • 50. 
    _______________"This educator promoted the making of education accessible to the poor, not only by providing schools but by teaching subjects in those schools that were interesting to and valued by common folk."