Diagnóstico De Inglés Para Realización De Exámenes GRE Y GMAT

19 Preguntas | Total Attempts: 143

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Diagnstico De Ingls Para Realizacin De Exmenes GRE Y GMAT

Esta es una herramienta de TestPoint - Standard Test and Admissions Preparation para evaluar el nivel de inglés de nuestros alumnos. NO predice su desempeño futuro en un examen estandarizado; la prueba está diseñada específicamente para detectar problemas estructurales -de fondo- en el dominio del inglés, de forma que el alumno pueda atenderlos antes de enfrentarse al examen estandarizado.


Questions and Answers
  • 1. 
    Find the missing word in the sentence.  We a television yesterday.
    • A. 

      Buy

    • B. 

      Buyed

    • C. 

      Bought

    • D. 

      Have bought

  • 2. 
    Find the missing word in the sentence.  After I for a couple of hours, I decided to stop.
    • A. 

      Was swimming

    • B. 

      Had been swimming

    • C. 

      Swim

    • D. 

      Had swam

  • 3. 
    Find the missing word in the sentence.  Shakespeare many plays.
    • A. 

      Writ

    • B. 

      Has written

    • C. 

      Had written

    • D. 

      Wrote

  • 4. 
    Find the missing word in the sentence. “What at seven o’ clock yesterday evening?”  “I was watching TV.”
    • A. 

      Did you do

    • B. 

      Were you doing

    • C. 

      Did you

    • D. 

      Were you

  • 5. 
    Which of the following sentences is correct?
    • A. 

      Tomorrow we may to be going to the beach.

    • B. 

      If Anna gets to the school before eight, she won't able to get in because they open at eight.

    • C. 

      In China you may need an international driver's license.

    • D. 

      I can't believe it; Sumiko would never has done such a thing!

    • E. 

      No, don't call them. At this time they would be sleeping.

  • 6. 
    Which of the following sentences is correct?
    • A. 

      Okay, who do you agree with?

    • B. 

      I could see three men, one of who was carrying a bag.

    • C. 

      Neither prawns nor mussels has that much zinc.

    • D. 

      An x-ray of all their equipment uncovered no illicit substances.

    • E. 

      We make pizza at it’s best!

  • 7. 
    Find the missing word in the sentence. She suddenly stopped speaking to him on the phone and the conversation came to an ____ end.
    • A. 

      Acute

    • B. 

      Arid

    • C. 

      Awful

    • D. 

      Abrupt

  • 8. 
    Find the missing word in the sentence. Although all the athletes were full of life at the start of the marathon, towards the end of the race a few were showing signs of tiredness and were clearly _____.
    • A. 

      Flogging

    • B. 

      Failing

    • C. 

      Flagging

    • D. 

      Foiling

  • 9. 
    Find the missing word in the sentence. Fortunately she took no notice of the reviews of her acting and was quite _____ to some of the more sarcastic comments.
    • A. 

      Important

    • B. 

      Impenetrable

    • C. 

      Immediate

    • D. 

      Impervious

  • 10. 
    Find the missing word in the sentence. Although her boss knew that she was not telling the truth, her explanations for being late were always so reasonable and totally _______ that he believed her.
    • A. 

      Pleasant

    • B. 

      Perceptive

    • C. 

      Penetrating

    • D. 

      Plausible

  • 11. 
    Find the missing word in the sentence. Everything about the village was what you'd call totally _______ because all the houses were well looked after and reminded you of a time long since gone.
    • A. 

      Quaint

    • B. 

      Queer

    • C. 

      Quiet

    • D. 

      Queenly

  • 12. 
    Stoicism is a noble philosophy that has proven to be more practicable than a modern cynic would expect. The Stoic viewpoint is often misunderstood because the casual reader misses the point—that all talk is in reference to the “inner life.” Stoics belittle physical harm, but this is not braggadocio. They are speaking of it in comparison to the devastating agony of shame they fancied good men generating when they knew in their hearts that they had failed to do their duty vis-à-vis their fellow men or God. Though pagan, the Stoics had a monotheistic natural religion and were great contributors to Christian thought. (…)  The Stoic demand for disciplined thought naturally won only a small minority to its standard, but those few were the strongest characters of that time. In theory a doctrine of pitiless perfectionism, Stoicism actually created men of courage, saintliness, and goodwill. Rhinelander singled out three examples: Cato the Younger, Emperor Marcus Aurelius, and Epictetus. Cato was the great Roman Republican who pitted himself against Julius Caesar. He was the unmistakable hero of our own George Washington; scholars find quotations of Cato in Washington's Farewell Address—without quotation marks. Emperor Marcus Aurelius took the Roman Empire to the pinnacle of its power and influence. And Epictetus, the great teacher, played his part in changing the leadership of Rome from the swill he had known under Nero to the power and decency it knew under Marcus Aurelius. Epictetus drew the same sort of audience Socrates had drawn 500 years earlier—young aristocrats destined for careers in finance, the arts, public service. The best families sent him their sons in their middle 20s—to be told what the good life consisted of, to be disabused of the idea that they deserved to become playboys, and to be taught that their job was to serve their fellow men. Epictetus’ model graduate was not a person “able to speak fluently about philosophic principles as an idle babbler, but about things that will do you good if your child dies, or your brother dies, or if you must die or be tortured. (…) Let others practice lawsuits, others study problems, others syllogisms; here you practice how to die, how to be enchained, how to be racked, how to be exiled.” A man is responsible for his own “judgments, even in dreams, in drunkenness, and in melancholy madness.” Each individual brings about his own good and his own evil, his good fortune, his ill fortune, his happiness, and his wretchedness. It is unthinkable that one man’s error could cause another’s suffering; suffering, like everything else in stoicism, was all intemal—remorse at destroying yourself. Epictetus was telling his students that there can be no such thing as being the “victim” of another. You can only be a “victim” of yourself. It's all in how you discipline your mind. Who is your master? “He who has authority over any of the things on which you have set your heart. (…) What is the result at which all virtue aims? Serenity. (…) Show me a man who though sick is happy, who though in danger is happy, who though in prison is happy, and I’II show you a Stoic.” From what can be inferred from the passage above, what is the author’s position on Stoicism?
    • A. 

      In favor

    • B. 

      Against

    • C. 

      Indifferent

    • D. 

      It cannot be determined from the passage

  • 13. 
    Stoicism is a noble philosophy that has proven to be more practicable than a modern cynic would expect. The Stoic viewpoint is often misunderstood because the casual reader misses the point—that all talk is in reference to the “inner life.” Stoics belittle physical harm, but this is not braggadocio. They are speaking of it in comparison to the devastating agony of shame they fancied good men generating when they knew in their hearts that they had failed to do their duty vis-à-vis their fellow men or God. Though pagan, the Stoics had a monotheistic natural religion and were great contributors to Christian thought. (…) The Stoic demand for disciplined thought naturally won only a small minority to its standard, but those few were the strongest characters of that time. In theory a doctrine of pitiless perfectionism, Stoicism actually created men of courage, saintliness, and goodwill. Rhinelander singled out three examples: Cato the Younger, Emperor Marcus Aurelius, and Epictetus. Cato was the great Roman Republican who pitted himself against Julius Caesar. He was the unmistakable hero of our own George Washington; scholars find quotations of Cato in Washington's Farewell Address—without quotation marks. Emperor Marcus Aurelius took the Roman Empire to the pinnacle of its power and influence. And Epictetus, the great teacher, played his part in changing the leadership of Rome from the swill he had known under Nero to the power and decency it knew under Marcus Aurelius.  Epictetus drew the same sort of audience Socrates had drawn 500 years earlier—young aristocrats destined for careers in finance, the arts, public service. The best families sent him their sons in their middle 20s—to be told what the good life consisted of, to be disabused of the idea that they deserved to become playboys, and to be taught that their job was to serve their fellow men. Epictetus’ model graduate was not a person “able to speak fluently about philosophic principles as an idle babbler, but about things that will do you good if your child dies, or your brother dies, or if you must die or be tortured. (…) Let others practice lawsuits, others study problems, others syllogisms; here you practice how to die, how to be enchained, how to be racked, how to be exiled.” A man is responsible for his own “judgments, even in dreams, in drunkenness, and in melancholy madness.” Each individual brings about his own good and his own evil, his good fortune, his ill fortune, his happiness, and his wretchedness. It is unthinkable that one man’s error could cause another’s suffering; suffering, like everything else in stoicism, was all intemal—remorse at destroying yourself. Epictetus was telling his students that there can be no such thing as being the “victim” of another. You can only be a “victim” of yourself. It's all in how you discipline your mind. Who is your master? “He who has authority over any of the things on which you have set your heart. (…) What is the result at which all virtue aims? Serenity. (…) Show me a man who though sick is happy, who though in danger is happy, who though in prison is happy, and I’II show you a Stoic.” What is the central argument of the passage?
    • A. 

      That the Stoic viewpoint is often misunderstood

    • B. 

      That each individual brings about his (or her) own good and evil

    • C. 

      That Stoicism has produced great men (or women) in history

    • D. 

      That Stoic philosophy has proven to be more applicable than is often thought

    • E. 

      That in Stoicism, all talk is about the “inner life”

  • 14. 
    Stoicism is a noble philosophy that has proven to be more practicable than a modern cynic would expect. The Stoic viewpoint is often misunderstood because the casual reader misses the point—that all talk is in reference to the “inner life.” Stoics belittle physical harm, but this is not braggadocio. They are speaking of it in comparison to the devastating agony of shame they fancied good men generating when they knew in their hearts that they had failed to do their duty vis-à-vis their fellow men or God. Though pagan, the Stoics had a monotheistic natural religion and were great contributors to Christian thought. (…) The Stoic demand for disciplined thought naturally won only a small minority to its standard, but those few were the strongest characters of that time. In theory a doctrine of pitiless perfectionism, Stoicism actually created men of courage, saintliness, and goodwill. Rhinelander singled out three examples: Cato the Younger, Emperor Marcus Aurelius, and Epictetus. Cato was the great Roman Republican who pitted himself against Julius Caesar. He was the unmistakable hero of our own George Washington; scholars find quotations of Cato in Washington's Farewell Address—without quotation marks. Emperor Marcus Aurelius took the Roman Empire to the pinnacle of its power and influence. And Epictetus, the great teacher, played his part in changing the leadership of Rome from the swill he had known under Nero to the power and decency it knew under Marcus Aurelius.  Epictetus drew the same sort of audience Socrates had drawn 500 years earlier—young aristocrats destined for careers in finance, the arts, public service. The best families sent him their sons in their middle 20s—to be told what the good life consisted of, to be disabused of the idea that they deserved to become playboys, and to be taught that their job was to serve their fellow men. Epictetus’ model graduate was not a person “able to speak fluently about philosophic principles as an idle babbler, but about things that will do you good if your child dies, or your brother dies, or if you must die or be tortured. (…) Let others practice lawsuits, others study problems, others syllogisms; here you practice how to die, how to be enchained, how to be racked, how to be exiled.” A man is responsible for his own “judgments, even in dreams, in drunkenness, and in melancholy madness.” Each individual brings about his own good and his own evil, his good fortune, his ill fortune, his happiness, and his wretchedness. It is unthinkable that one man’s error could cause another’s suffering; suffering, like everything else in stoicism, was all intemal—remorse at destroying yourself. Epictetus was telling his students that there can be no such thing as being the “victim” of another. You can only be a “victim” of yourself. It's all in how you discipline your mind. Who is your master? “He who has authority over any of the things on which you have set your heart. (…) What is the result at which all virtue aims? Serenity. (…) Show me a man who though sick is happy, who though in danger is happy, who though in prison is happy, and I’II show you a Stoic.” According to the author, why do Stoics belittle physical harm?
    • A. 

      Because they do not seek to physically harm others

    • B. 

      Because they believe in a monotheistic God

    • C. 

      Because they compare it to the deep shame of failing to do your duty in the face of your fellow men or God

    • D. 

      Because they know what to do if their child or brother dies, or if they must die or undergo pain

  • 15. 
    Stoicism is a noble philosophy that has proven to be more practicable than a modern cynic would expect. The Stoic viewpoint is often misunderstood because the casual reader misses the point—that all talk is in reference to the “inner life.” Stoics belittle physical harm, but this is not braggadocio. They are speaking of it in comparison to the devastating agony of shame they fancied good men generating when they knew in their hearts that they had failed to do their duty vis-à-vis their fellow men or God. Though pagan, the Stoics had a monotheistic natural religion and were great contributors to Christian thought. (…) The Stoic demand for disciplined thought naturally won only a small minority to its standard, but those few were the strongest characters of that time. In theory a doctrine of pitiless perfectionism, Stoicism actually created men of courage, saintliness, and goodwill. Rhinelander singled out three examples: Cato the Younger, Emperor Marcus Aurelius, and Epictetus. Cato was the great Roman Republican who pitted himself against Julius Caesar. He was the unmistakable hero of our own George Washington; scholars find quotations of Cato in Washington's Farewell Address—without quotation marks. Emperor Marcus Aurelius took the Roman Empire to the pinnacle of its power and influence. And Epictetus, the great teacher, played his part in changing the leadership of Rome from the swill he had known under Nero to the power and decency it knew under Marcus Aurelius.  Epictetus drew the same sort of audience Socrates had drawn 500 years earlier—young aristocrats destined for careers in finance, the arts, public service. The best families sent him their sons in their middle 20s—to be told what the good life consisted of, to be disabused of the idea that they deserved to become playboys, and to be taught that their job was to serve their fellow men. Epictetus’ model graduate was not a person “able to speak fluently about philosophic principles as an idle babbler, but about things that will do you good if your child dies, or your brother dies, or if you must die or be tortured. (…) Let others practice lawsuits, others study problems, others syllogisms; here you practice how to die, how to be enchained, how to be racked, how to be exiled.” A man is responsible for his own “judgments, even in dreams, in drunkenness, and in melancholy madness.” Each individual brings about his own good and his own evil, his good fortune, his ill fortune, his happiness, and his wretchedness. It is unthinkable that one man’s error could cause another’s suffering; suffering, like everything else in stoicism, was all intemal—remorse at destroying yourself. Epictetus was telling his students that there can be no such thing as being the “victim” of another. You can only be a “victim” of yourself. It's all in how you discipline your mind. Who is your master? “He who has authority over any of the things on which you have set your heart. (…) What is the result at which all virtue aims? Serenity. (…) Show me a man who though sick is happy, who though in danger is happy, who though in prison is happy, and I’II show you a Stoic.” As used in this passage, the best antonym of “braggadocio” would be:
    • A. 

      Modesty

    • B. 

      Fear

    • C. 

      Ostentation

    • D. 

      Garishness

    • E. 

      Common sense

  • 16. 
    Stoicism is a noble philosophy that has proven to be more practicable than a modern cynic would expect. The Stoic viewpoint is often misunderstood because the casual reader misses the point—that all talk is in reference to the “inner life.” Stoics belittle physical harm, but this is not braggadocio. They are speaking of it in comparison to the devastating agony of shame they fancied good men generating when they knew in their hearts that they had failed to do their duty vis-à-vis their fellow men or God. Though pagan, the Stoics had a monotheistic natural religion and were great contributors to Christian thought. (…) The Stoic demand for disciplined thought naturally won only a small minority to its standard, but those few were the strongest characters of that time. In theory a doctrine of pitiless perfectionism, Stoicism actually created men of courage, saintliness, and goodwill. Rhinelander singled out three examples: Cato the Younger, Emperor Marcus Aurelius, and Epictetus. Cato was the great Roman Republican who pitted himself against Julius Caesar. He was the unmistakable hero of our own George Washington; scholars find quotations of Cato in Washington's Farewell Address—without quotation marks. Emperor Marcus Aurelius took the Roman Empire to the pinnacle of its power and influence. And Epictetus, the great teacher, played his part in changing the leadership of Rome from the swill he had known under Nero to the power and decency it knew under Marcus Aurelius.  Epictetus drew the same sort of audience Socrates had drawn 500 years earlier—young aristocrats destined for careers in finance, the arts, public service. The best families sent him their sons in their middle 20s—to be told what the good life consisted of, to be disabused of the idea that they deserved to become playboys, and to be taught that their job was to serve their fellow men. Epictetus’ model graduate was not a person “able to speak fluently about philosophic principles as an idle babbler, but about things that will do you good if your child dies, or your brother dies, or if you must die or be tortured. (…) Let others practice lawsuits, others study problems, others syllogisms; here you practice how to die, how to be enchained, how to be racked, how to be exiled.” A man is responsible for his own “judgments, even in dreams, in drunkenness, and in melancholy madness.” Each individual brings about his own good and his own evil, his good fortune, his ill fortune, his happiness, and his wretchedness. It is unthinkable that one man’s error could cause another’s suffering; suffering, like everything else in stoicism, was all intemal—remorse at destroying yourself. Epictetus was telling his students that there can be no such thing as being the “victim” of another. You can only be a “victim” of yourself. It's all in how you discipline your mind. Who is your master? “He who has authority over any of the things on which you have set your heart. (…) What is the result at which all virtue aims? Serenity. (…) Show me a man who though sick is happy, who though in danger is happy, who though in prison is happy, and I’II show you a Stoic.” When the author uses the word “pitted”, he means:
    • A. 

      Befriended

    • B. 

      Withdrew himself

    • C. 

      Overcame

    • D. 

      Opposed

    • E. 

      Destroyed

  • 17. 
    Stoicism is a noble philosophy that has proven to be more practicable than a modern cynic would expect. The Stoic viewpoint is often misunderstood because the casual reader misses the point—that all talk is in reference to the “inner life.” Stoics belittle physical harm, but this is not braggadocio. They are speaking of it in comparison to the devastating agony of shame they fancied good men generating when they knew in their hearts that they had failed to do their duty vis-à-vis their fellow men or God. Though pagan, the Stoics had a monotheistic natural religion and were great contributors to Christian thought. (…) The Stoic demand for disciplined thought naturally won only a small minority to its standard, but those few were the strongest characters of that time. In theory a doctrine of pitiless perfectionism, Stoicism actually created men of courage, saintliness, and goodwill. Rhinelander singled out three examples: Cato the Younger, Emperor Marcus Aurelius, and Epictetus. Cato was the great Roman Republican who pitted himself against Julius Caesar. He was the unmistakable hero of our own George Washington; scholars find quotations of Cato in Washington's Farewell Address—without quotation marks. Emperor Marcus Aurelius took the Roman Empire to the pinnacle of its power and influence. And Epictetus, the great teacher, played his part in changing the leadership of Rome from the swill he had known under Nero to the power and decency it knew under Marcus Aurelius.  Epictetus drew the same sort of audience Socrates had drawn 500 years earlier—young aristocrats destined for careers in finance, the arts, public service. The best families sent him their sons in their middle 20s—to be told what the good life consisted of, to be disabused of the idea that they deserved to become playboys, and to be taught that their job was to serve their fellow men. Epictetus’ model graduate was not a person “able to speak fluently about philosophic principles as an idle babbler, but about things that will do you good if your child dies, or your brother dies, or if you must die or be tortured. (…) Let others practice lawsuits, others study problems, others syllogisms; here you practice how to die, how to be enchained, how to be racked, how to be exiled.” A man is responsible for his own “judgments, even in dreams, in drunkenness, and in melancholy madness.” Each individual brings about his own good and his own evil, his good fortune, his ill fortune, his happiness, and his wretchedness. It is unthinkable that one man’s error could cause another’s suffering; suffering, like everything else in stoicism, was all intemal—remorse at destroying yourself. Epictetus was telling his students that there can be no such thing as being the “victim” of another. You can only be a “victim” of yourself. It's all in how you discipline your mind. Who is your master? “He who has authority over any of the things on which you have set your heart. (…) What is the result at which all virtue aims? Serenity. (…) Show me a man who though sick is happy, who though in danger is happy, who though in prison is happy, and I’II show you a Stoic.” By “scholars find quotations of Cato in Washington's Farewell Address—without quotation marks”, the author’s main point is that:
    • A. 

      Cato was read by Washington

    • B. 

      Washington plagiarized Cato

    • C. 

      Perhaps Washington had not read Cato, but they shared almost identical ideas

    • D. 

      Washington had internalized Cato’s writings

    • E. 

      Great men (and women) think alike

  • 18. 
    Stoicism is a noble philosophy that has proven to be more practicable than a modern cynic would expect. The Stoic viewpoint is often misunderstood because the casual reader misses the point—that all talk is in reference to the “inner life.” Stoics belittle physical harm, but this is not braggadocio. They are speaking of it in comparison to the devastating agony of shame they fancied good men generating when they knew in their hearts that they had failed to do their duty vis-à-vis their fellow men or God. Though pagan, the Stoics had a monotheistic natural religion and were great contributors to Christian thought. (…) The Stoic demand for disciplined thought naturally won only a small minority to its standard, but those few were the strongest characters of that time. In theory a doctrine of pitiless perfectionism, Stoicism actually created men of courage, saintliness, and goodwill. Rhinelander singled out three examples: Cato the Younger, Emperor Marcus Aurelius, and Epictetus. Cato was the great Roman Republican who pitted himself against Julius Caesar. He was the unmistakable hero of our own George Washington; scholars find quotations of Cato in Washington's Farewell Address—without quotation marks. Emperor Marcus Aurelius took the Roman Empire to the pinnacle of its power and influence. And Epictetus, the great teacher, played his part in changing the leadership of Rome from the swill he had known under Nero to the power and decency it knew under Marcus Aurelius.  Epictetus drew the same sort of audience Socrates had drawn 500 years earlier—young aristocrats destined for careers in finance, the arts, public service. The best families sent him their sons in their middle 20s—to be told what the good life consisted of, to be disabused of the idea that they deserved to become playboys, and to be taught that their job was to serve their fellow men. Epictetus’ model graduate was not a person “able to speak fluently about philosophic principles as an idle babbler, but about things that will do you good if your child dies, or your brother dies, or if you must die or be tortured. (…) Let others practice lawsuits, others study problems, others syllogisms; here you practice how to die, how to be enchained, how to be racked, how to be exiled.” A man is responsible for his own “judgments, even in dreams, in drunkenness, and in melancholy madness.” Each individual brings about his own good and his own evil, his good fortune, his ill fortune, his happiness, and his wretchedness. It is unthinkable that one man’s error could cause another’s suffering; suffering, like everything else in stoicism, was all intemal—remorse at destroying yourself. Epictetus was telling his students that there can be no such thing as being the “victim” of another. You can only be a “victim” of yourself. It's all in how you discipline your mind. Who is your master? “He who has authority over any of the things on which you have set your heart. (…) What is the result at which all virtue aims? Serenity. (…) Show me a man who though sick is happy, who though in danger is happy, who though in prison is happy, and I’II show you a Stoic.” By “unmistakable hero”, the author implies that Cato:
    • A. 

      Was not prone to mistakes

    • B. 

      Is sometimes confused with other individuals admired by Washington

    • C. 

      Was undoubtedly Washington’s hero

    • D. 

      Was more heroic than almost anyone else

    • E. 

      None of the above

  • 19. 
    Stoicism is a noble philosophy that has proven to be more practicable than a modern cynic would expect. The Stoic viewpoint is often misunderstood because the casual reader misses the point—that all talk is in reference to the “inner life.” Stoics belittle physical harm, but this is not braggadocio. They are speaking of it in comparison to the devastating agony of shame they fancied good men generating when they knew in their hearts that they had failed to do their duty vis-à-vis their fellow men or God. Though pagan, the Stoics had a monotheistic natural religion and were great contributors to Christian thought. (…) The Stoic demand for disciplined thought naturally won only a small minority to its standard, but those few were the strongest characters of that time. In theory a doctrine of pitiless perfectionism, Stoicism actually created men of courage, saintliness, and goodwill. Rhinelander singled out three examples: Cato the Younger, Emperor Marcus Aurelius, and Epictetus. Cato was the great Roman Republican who pitted himself against Julius Caesar. He was the unmistakable hero of our own George Washington; scholars find quotations of Cato in Washington's Farewell Address—without quotation marks. Emperor Marcus Aurelius took the Roman Empire to the pinnacle of its power and influence. And Epictetus, the great teacher, played his part in changing the leadership of Rome from the swill he had known under Nero to the power and decency it knew under Marcus Aurelius.  Epictetus drew the same sort of audience Socrates had drawn 500 years earlier—young aristocrats destined for careers in finance, the arts, public service. The best families sent him their sons in their middle 20s—to be told what the good life consisted of, to be disabused of the idea that they deserved to become playboys, and to be taught that their job was to serve their fellow men. Epictetus’ model graduate was not a person “able to speak fluently about philosophic principles as an idle babbler, but about things that will do you good if your child dies, or your brother dies, or if you must die or be tortured. (…) Let others practice lawsuits, others study problems, others syllogisms; here you practice how to die, how to be enchained, how to be racked, how to be exiled.” A man is responsible for his own “judgments, even in dreams, in drunkenness, and in melancholy madness.” Each individual brings about his own good and his own evil, his good fortune, his ill fortune, his happiness, and his wretchedness. It is unthinkable that one man’s error could cause another’s suffering; suffering, like everything else in stoicism, was all intemal—remorse at destroying yourself. Epictetus was telling his students that there can be no such thing as being the “victim” of another. You can only be a “victim” of yourself. It's all in how you discipline your mind. Who is your master? “He who has authority over any of the things on which you have set your heart. (…) What is the result at which all virtue aims? Serenity. (…) Show me a man who though sick is happy, who though in danger is happy, who though in prison is happy, and I’II show you a Stoic.” “Epictetus was telling his students that there can be no such thing as being the ‘victim’ of another.” This means that:
    • A. 

      It is impossible to inflict bodily pain on others

    • B. 

      If something bad happens to you, it is because you deserved it

    • C. 

      Victimhood and suffering are thoughts, and your thoughts are up to you

    • D. 

      Stoics seek out revenge for the wrongs inflicted on them, so they are not victims

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