CSR Quiz

51 Questions

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CSR Quizzes & Trivia

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Questions and Answers
  • 1. 
    Ethical dilemmas:
    • A. 

      Take place when you want to avoid causing harm, or you want to do good, but are not sure how

    • B. 

      Involve possible harm only to others but not to yourself

    • C. 

      Involve possible harm only to yourself but not to others

    • D. 

      Take place only when you are in charge and have the authority and power to have your voice heard

    • E. 

      Are approached in an entirely rational way without any feeling of emotion or distress

  • 2. 
    Adam Smith believed that ethics arose from:
    • A. 

      Charity

    • B. 

      Righteousness

    • C. 

      Government regulation

    • D. 

      Benevolence

    • E. 

      Barter and exchange (providing others what they want in order to obtain what you want)

  • 3. 
    Virtue ethics as proposed by a classic thinker like Aristotle:
    • A. 

      Focuses on utility (maximizing pleasure and minimizing pain)

    • B. 

      Aims for excess

    • C. 

      Aims for deficiency

    • D. 

      Tries to find a mean between character traits like risk taking and risk avoidance

    • E. 

      Maintains that our duty is to give up compliance with the law in order to achieve economic goals

  • 4. 
    Aristotle’s concept of the middle path may be translated into the idea that a manager must:
    • A. 

      Find the right balance among ethics, the law, and making money

    • B. 

      Strive for social justice

    • C. 

      Give shareholders priority

    • D. 

      Avoid practice and experience

    • E. 

      Tell the truth at all times

  • 5. 
    Beyond compliance means:
    • A. 

      There is no difference between what we have the right to do and what is right

    • B. 

      If it is not prohibited by law it is ethical

    • C. 

      Some behaviors, though legal, and not specifically prohibited by law, raise ethical issues

    • D. 

      Given that the law is continually evolving, mere compliance is sufficient

    • E. 

      Since the law fails to evolve in response to ethical abuses, there is no reason to do anything more than what it stipulates

  • 6. 
    Section 5 of the U.S. Federal Trade Commission Act maintains that it is:
    • A. 

      Permissible to avoid responsibility for the claims made by a company’s designated agents (for example, its advertising agency)

    • B. 

      Permissible to make claims without tangible or quantifiable proof

    • C. 

      Permissible to make claims that slam the competition

    • D. 

      Permissible to make claims by leaving out relevant information

    • E. 

      Impermissible to deceive or mislead customers

  • 7. 
    A utilitarian calculus of costs and benefits would be able to justify all of the following except:
    • A. 

      Slavery

    • B. 

      Torturing an individual for sake of the majority

    • C. 

      The death of a gladiator

    • D. 

      Selling cigarettes

    • E. 

      Telling the truth to a terrorist

  • 8. 
    “Every rational being exists as an end in himself” (or herself) is a fundamental ethical principle that implies that you should…
    • A. 

      Pay exclusive attention to the end results of your actions

    • B. 

      Achieve the greatest good

    • C. 

      Treat people with respect and never as mere means

    • D. 

      Fully calculate the consequences of your actions

    • E. 

      Treat people as means for the accomplishment of your goals

  • 9. 
    You work at a large chemical plant and are very concerned about these risks -- the failure to inform residents who live close to the plant about what they should do in case of an accident, a series of past chemical leaks and releases, poor maintenance, staff reductions, redundant backup systems that do not function, and design flaws in the  backup systems that even if they did function would not prevent an accident. You are very upset and angry and argue with your boss.You first say, “We are not even acting according to a moral minimum of stopping preventable harm.” Your statement is about:
    • A. 

      The facts

    • B. 

      Consequences

    • C. 

      Options

    • D. 

      Principles

    • E. 

      A plan the company should carry out

  • 10. 
    Your boss responds, “Come on now, nothing bad has happened and nothing will.” His argument is about:
    • A. 

      The issue

    • B. 

      The consequences of not taking action

    • C. 

      An option

    • D. 

      Principles

    • E. 

      A Plan B

  • 11. 
    You retort, “But we could invest in a new maintenance crew or at least fix the backup systems.” You are voicing your opinion about:
    • A. 

      Principles

    • B. 

      An option

    • C. 

      Effects

    • D. 

      The issue

    • E. 

      The facts

  • 12. 
    Your boss says, “We can’t do anything now because the impact on our bottom line would be bad.” His statement is about:
    • A. 

      Effects

    • B. 

      The facts

    • C. 

      The issue

    • D. 

      An option

    • E. 

      His Plan B

  • 13. 
    You say, “Well, if we can’t fix the backup systems, at least we can give the community some guidance about what it should do in case of an accident.” Your statement is about:
    • A. 

      Impacts

    • B. 

      Consequences

    • C. 

      An option

    • D. 

      Principles

    • E. 

      The facts

  • 14. 
    People in business:
    • A. 

      Show little reluctance to talk about ethics

    • B. 

      Tend to confine their ethical discussion to economic impacts

    • C. 

      Resolve ethical issues with appeal to abstract moral principles

    • D. 

      Rely exclusively on the categorical imperative in ethical discussion

    • E. 

      Refuse to discuss ethical issues in practical terms

  • 15. 
    The “Golden Rule”:
    • A. 

      Is Aristotle’s attempt to reconcile excess and deficiency

    • B. 

      Can be criticized for relying on the standard of “what is good for oneself” is good for one’s neighbor

    • C. 

      Never could be used to justify a sado-masochist torturing his or her neighbor

    • D. 

      Takes into account what is “good for others” from their perspective

    • E. 

      Permits killing a person to distribute their body parts to more worthy individuals

  • 16. 
    Adam Smith believed that:
    • A. 

      No moral prerequisites exist for the effective operation of a market

    • B. 

      Human dignity and rights do not have to be respected in business

    • C. 

      Government regulation is not needed

    • D. 

      Honesty, transparency, and fairness have no place in business

    • E. 

      For the market to operate freely there have to be principles and standards that ensure free competition including property rights, no restraints of trade, no monopolies, and open entry and exit of businesses

  • 17. 
    The fact that most people (80%) will not throw a person off the bridge in an attempt to save 5 workers on a railroad track suggests that they are applying the principles of:
    • A. 

      Utilitarianism

    • B. 

      A rights-based ethic

    • C. 

      The end justifies the means

    • D. 

      Virtue

    • E. 

      The greatest good

  • 18. 
    The “Everything You Know About a Product” matches the “Single Cask of Water” dilemma in that:
    • A. 

      Your benefit and that of other people are aligned

    • B. 

      Win-win outcomes are easy to achieve

    • C. 

      Ample resources exist for everyone to be satisfied

    • D. 

      Choices between harming yourself and harming someone else do not have to be considered

    • E. 

      Sharing information may improve the chances for a better outcome

  • 19. 
    The “Tight Schedule” dilemma involves a conflict between:
    • A. 

      Honesty and getting product to a customer on time

    • B. 

      Your bonus and the bonus of the certified welder

    • C. 

      The company’s strong emphasis on quality and the government’s emphasis on meaningless standards

    • D. 

      Your scrupulous attention to detail and the sloppy ethics of your supply chain partners

    • E. 

      Your willingness to obey authority versus the apprentice welder’s defiance of authority

  • 20. 
    In using the framework:
    • A. 

      A backup plan is never required because things always go as you expect

    • B. 

      Keep your options separate in your action plan without trying to unite them based on the best features of each option

    • C. 

      Long lists of incompatible principles are always necessary

    • D. 

      In identifying the issue do not search for a single underlying question

    • E. 

      Try to summarize the bottom line for each option you consider so you can compare them

  • 21. 
    The fact that most people (80%) say to pull lever in the train track dilemma suggests that in this instance they are relying on:
    • A. 

      A utilitarian ethic

    • B. 

      A rights-based ethic

    • C. 

      The principle that the end never justifies the means

    • D. 

      The mean between extremes

    • E. 

      The norm of the lesser good

  • 22. 
    Consider the dilemma of whether to steal medicine to save a spouse’s life if you cannot otherwise afford the medicine. If you steal the medicine your highest principle is:
    • A. 

      Obeying the law

    • B. 

      Winning social approval

    • C. 

      Justifying the means because of the ends

    • D. 

      Not overriding morality in cases of dire need

    • E. 

      Doing what is right regardless of the consequences

  • 23. 
    The consequences of our actions:
    • A. 

      Are always perfectly known to us with complete certainty in advance

    • B. 

      Are given to us with perfect knowledge of the odds of what is to occur next

    • C. 

      Are completely unknowable and a waste of time to try to figure out

    • D. 

      Are partially but incompletely and imperfectly known to us

    • E. 

      Are irrelevant in most decision contexts

  • 24. 
    When confronted with ethical challenges most people:
    • A. 

      just rely on emotions

    • B. 

      Without any apparent discomfort appeal to authority and law and order and precisely follow orders

    • C. 

      Do not look for social approval

    • D. 

      Rely solely on their rational capacities

    • E. 

      Rely partially on both their rational judgment of consequences and their emotions of caring and sympathy

  • 25. 
    An aspect of Kant’s opposition to Bentham’s utilitarianism is based on the idea of:
    • A. 

      Accepting external authority

    • B. 

      Autonomy – or establishing a law of your own – that frees you from the desire for pleasure

    • C. 

      Being resigned to your fate

    • D. 

      Accepting the influence of habit

    • E. 

      Permitting yourself to engage in actions which you would condemn in others

  • 26. 
    An ethical principle that states that you should do what is right regardless of how you feel about consequences is most closely identified with:
    • A. 

      Deontology

    • B. 

      Teleology

    • C. 

      Psychological experiments

    • D. 

      Kohlberg’s early ethical stages

    • E. 

      Utilitarianism

  • 27. 
    When Lenin said “You have to break an egg to make an omelet" he was expressing an ethical principle that:
    • A. 

      Relied on the means to justify the ends

    • B. 

      Relied on the ends to justify the means

    • C. 

      Was indifferent to means and ends

    • D. 

      Revealed his compassion for every human being

    • E. 

      Showed his profound contempt for utilitarian moral reasoning

  • 28. 
    In the marshmallow experiments, children of age 4-5 years:
    • A. 

      Who did not show self-control succeeded in later life in business jobs requiring acquisitive instincts and aggressiveness

    • B. 

      Who waited to receive a second marshmallow did better in major indicators of later life success like going to a good college and getting a good job

    • C. 

      Who showed self-control did worse in most major indicators of later life success

    • D. 

      Who showed self-control did not do any better or any worse later in life

    • E. 

      Who did not show self-control tended to become CEOs of major US corporations

  • 29. 
    According to Mill:
    • A. 

      Money is a perfectly good metric to use when comparing consequences

    • B. 

      Pleasure and pain are the intrinsic values of highest importance

    • C. 

      Happiness is the same as pleasure

    • D. 

      Happiness, when it stands for something more than simple pleasure, is the intrinsic value of greatest importance

    • E. 

      Happiness may be easily defined as freedom, knowledge, justice, and beauty

  • 30. 
    Kant’s ethical system:
    • A. 

      Permits business deception when there is no other choice

    • B. 

      Allows for absolutely no exceptions to the rule that people should never be treated simply as a means

    • C. 

      Allows for lying when it means lives will be saved

    • D. 

      Celebrates a shopkeeper who refused to deceive a child because of the shop keeper’s concern for his reputation

    • E. 

      Allows for different standards when it involves one’s own behavior and the behavior of others

  • 31. 
    The framework:
    • A. 

      Is based on one-sided principles entirely in accord with Kant’s deontology

    • B. 

      Is based on a one-sided principles entirely in accord with Bentham’s ideas about pain and pleasure

    • C. 

      Is based on a one-sided principles entirely in accord with Mill’s principle of happiness

    • D. 

      Takes into account ethical systems that accord importance to both consequences (teleology) and principles (deontology)

    • E. 

      Favors ends based ethical systems over means based ethical systems

  • 32. 
    A problem with an ethics based on consequences such as the ethics of Bentham and Mill is that:
    • A. 

      The odds of what is likely to take place next are known with great certainty

    • B. 

      The goals for which we should be striving, whether they be pleasure or some higher notion of happiness, are well-known to us and universally accepted

    • C. 

      The consequences of our actions can be easily quantified and compared using the same metric

    • D. 

      It is hard to accurately predict the future

    • E. 

      Even with unintended consequences we are able to easily predict the future

  • 33. 
    Cost-benefit analysis, such as that used by Ford in the Pinto case or Lockheed in the Japanese bribery case:
    • A. 

      Resolves all ethical dilemmas satisfactorily

    • B. 

      Is never misleading because important costs (the suits against Ford and the public revelation of bribery) are always taken sufficiently seriously

    • C. 

      Before-the-fact did not justify either the placement of the gas tank or the bribe but after-the-fact demonstrated that management had appropriately weighed the odds and done the “right” thing

    • D. 

      After-the-fact did not justify either the placement of the gas tank or the bribe but before-the-fact was used by management to suggest that it had appropriately weighed the consequences

    • E. 

      Is entirely consistent with deontological principles

  • 34. 
    The “examined life” means:
    • A. 

      Acting on the basis of habit

    • B. 

      Doing what others expect

    • C. 

      Following authority

    • D. 

      Being influenced by your emotions and desires to do the “right” thing

    • E. 

      Scrutinizing the implications of your actions

  • 35. 
    Lying is:
    • A. 

      Very uncommon among human beings

    • B. 

      Is mostly confined to politicians who have a huge need to be loved

    • C. 

      Is mostly a means to an end, but not necessarily a monetary end, rather to a desire to look good

    • D. 

      Is never justified even when its purpose is to smooth over social interactions

    • E. 

      Is never ok, according to utilitarian principles, even when it involves saving a life

  • 36. 
    The classics (Plato and Aristotle):
    • A. 

      Had a simple solution to ends means dilemmas – the means came first

    • B. 

      Believed that as people gained experience and practiced ethical decision making their capacity to make good decisions declined

    • C. 

      Believed that as people gained experience and practiced ethical decision making their capacity to make good decisions increased

    • D. 

      Believed in disharmony and lack of balance –extreme cases in ethics demanded extreme answers

    • E. 

      Believed that there was a single best way to solve all ethical dilemmas which was based on rules that did not vary with circumstance

  • 37. 
    • A. 

      Avoiding guilt

    • B. 

      Avoiding punishment

    • C. 

      Beauty, justice, friendship, or peace

    • D. 

      Attracting customers

    • E. 

      Achieving high returns for shareholders

  • 38. 
    To the deontologist an act has moral worth when:
    • A. 

      It promotes pleasure or happiness

    • B. 

      It is done out of duty without any inclination

    • C. 

      It is pursued for a “chief good” or an end that is desired for its own sake

    • D. 

      It benefits a corporation

    • E. 

      When the sum total of utilities produced by that act is greater than the sum total of utilities produced by any other act the corporation could have performed in its place.

  • 39. 
    Experiments indicate that most people:
    • A. 

      When given the chance will cheat as much as they can

    • B. 

      Are not comfortable with even cheating a little

    • C. 

      Are constrained from cheating by monetary incentives

    • D. 

      Are constrained from cheating by the likelihood of getting caught

    • E. 

      Are constrained from cheating by a reminder of morality

  • 40. 
    Scans of the human brain show that:
    • A. 

      Most people are not conflicted about ethical behavior

    • B. 

      Have a bias toward utilitarian answers to ethical dilemmas

    • C. 

      Have a bias toward individual rights when facing ethical issues

    • D. 

      Have no trouble dealing with ethical dilemmas

    • E. 

      Have two separate inclinations toward ethical behavior in which a battle takes place between parts of the brain representing calculation and emotion

  • 41. 
    A categorical duty:
    • A. 

      Can be modified in light of the consequences

    • B. 

      Can be modified if it involves more pleasure for a majority of people than pain

    • C. 

      Can be modified if the law commands otherwise

    • D. 

      Can be modified if it involves deceiving or tricking a known thief

    • E. 

      Cannot be modified under any circumstances

  • 42. 
    All but one of the following is common to the methods companies recommend to their employees for dealing with ethical issues:
    • A. 

      Consider the facts

    • B. 

      Consider the effects, whom you might be injuring and how badly

    • C. 

      Consider the gains and losses from an action

    • D. 

      Consider the principles

    • E. 

      Consider the company’s rights before ethical principles

  • 43. 
    The first item listed below is an intrinsic good, while the second one is an extrinsic good:
    • A. 

      Wisdom---eating a candy bar when hungry

    • B. 

      Eating a candy bar when hungry---beauty

    • C. 

      Going to the butcher---having a good meal with friends

    • D. 

      Lying about the weather---having a refined experience

    • E. 

      Cheating on your taxes---giving to charity

  • 44. 
    Utilitarianism as a principle of ethics calls on you to consider:
    • A. 

      The greatest good for the greatest number

    • B. 

      The greatest happiness for the few

    • C. 

      Love for your fellow human beings

    • D. 

      What is in the best interest of your neighbor

    • E. 

      Maximizing wisdom, peace, and fellowship and not dollar values

  • 45. 
    A limitation of utilitarianism as a principle of ethics is that:
    • A. 

      We have perfect knowledge of what is going to come next

    • B. 

      Our foresight is far better than our hindsight

    • C. 

      Our imaginative rehearsals of the future cannot tell us with certainty what the consequences of our actions will be

    • D. 

      We can assign precise odds about what is to come next

    • E. 

      We can accurately describe future states

  • 46. 
    The classics (Plato and Aristotle):
    • A. 

      Believed that ethics consisted in the development of character traits (or virtues) such as courage, fidelity, and wisdom

    • B. 

      Believed that even with practice people would not develop virtuous habits

    • C. 

      Believed that upholding a religious faith was more important than personal integrity

    • D. 

      Had a pre-capitalist belief that to get what you want you had to provide your neighbor with what he or she wanted

    • E. 

      Believed that one should never lie, steal, or deal falsely

  • 47. 
    Kant’s moral theory is:
    • A. 

      Predicated on the capacity of rational individuals to use their reason to behave freely and resist temptation

    • B. 

      Is grounded in the facts and not in what a human should or ought to do

    • C. 

      Is based on pursuing an intrinsic source of happiness such as love, wisdom, or friendship

    • D. 

      Is aided by our ability to accurately see the effects of our actions

    • E. 

      Is motivated by a consideration for human welfare

  • 48. 
    Merck and Johnson:
    • A. 

      Placed shareholders ahead of customers and the users of its products and therefore aggressively marketed products that put its customers at risk

    • B. 

      Placed customers and the users of its products ahead of its shareholder and therefore quickly recalled products that put its customers at risk

    • C. 

      As soon as they became aware of any harm that Vioxx and the DuPuy hip replacement could cause voluntarily recalled the products

    • D. 

      Faced billion of dollars in damage awards because they failed to recall Vioxx and the DuPuy hip replacement after they obtained warnings that these products might harm customers

    • E. 

      Refused to recall Vioxx and DuPuy because of their dedication to customer welfare

  • 49. 
    • A. 

      Never required that Merck put a warning label on Vioxx despite the company requesting that the agency do so

    • B. 

      Had to force Merck to recall Vioxx because the company refused to recall the product voluntarily

    • C. 

      Had to force J&J to recall the DuPuy hip replacement because the company refused to recall the product voluntarily

    • D. 

      Was about to recall Vioxx and the DuPuy hip replacement when Merck and J&J agreed to voluntarily recall the products

    • E. 

      Gave warning to Merck and J&J which they promptly heeded and which allowed them to avoid further liability for Vioxx and the DuPuy hip replacement

  • 50. 
    The following best describes what either J&J or Merck knew prior to the recall of the hip replacement or Vioxx:
    • A. 

      J&J knew from orthopedic databases that the DuPuy hip replacement failed in 40 percent of patients after five years as opposed to most hip replacement lasting 15 years before they needed to be supplanted

    • B. 

      Merck first learned of problems with Vioxx after the drug the drug

    • C. 

      Merck knew of Vioxx’s problems prior to release of the drug since it carried out careful studies that included patients with cardiovascular problems

    • D. 

      J&J found about the problems with the hip replacement because its employees systematically leaked negative information about the hip replacements to the Wall Street Journal and other media outlets

    • E. 

      Merck and J&J both learned about problems with Vioxx and the hip replacement because of the vigorous actions taken by FDA officials to expose these problems