Critical Thinking Mid-term Practice Test

39 Questions

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Critical Thinking Mid-term Practice Test

There is a way in which a critical thinker is expected to act in a given situation and they have a high attention to detail. The quiz below takes us what we have learnt about critical thinking and a critical thinker. Give it a shot, as it will help you in the upcoming midterms.


Questions and Answers
  • 1. 
    According to your textbook, the world would be much better off without moral judgments.  Further moral judgments should be made on the basis of the concept of "majority rules" and we should not judge another country's cultural practices.
    • A. 

      True

    • B. 

      False

  • 2. 
    The principle of identity states that if a statement is true, then it is true.
    • A. 

      True

    • B. 

      False

  • 3. 
    According to the principle of contradictions, a statement can be both true and false.
    • A. 

      True

    • B. 

      False

  • 4. 
    • A. 

      True

    • B. 

      False

  • 5. 
    According to the principle of the excluded middle, a statement is either true or false.  It cannot be both.  
    • A. 

      True

    • B. 

      False

  • 6. 
    The following argument:  All roses are flowers.  All violets are flowers.  Therefore, all roses are violets. Can best be represented as:
    • A. 

      Illicit process major

    • B. 

      The undistributed middle

    • C. 

      Illicit process minor

    • D. 

      Valid argument

  • 7. 
    All logic arguments can be expressed as either a syllogism or a conditional.
    • A. 

      True

    • B. 

      False

  • 8. 
    The following argument:  If my mother is late, there will be no dinner.  There is no dinner.  Therefore, my mother must be late. can best be expressed as:
    • A. 

      Converting a conditional

    • B. 

      Valid argument

    • C. 

      Affirming the consequent

    • D. 

      Denying the antecedent

  • 9. 
    An expression of taste doesn't require any meaningful defense.
    • A. 

      True

    • B. 

      False

  • 10. 
    A "devil's advocate" is when one person is selected in a group to challenge the arguments made by other members of the group.  In this way, the group can create a stronger, better thought out argument.
    • A. 

      True

    • B. 

      False

  • 11. 
    The judgment phase of thinking is where all the good ideas occur and the production phase is the phase of thinking where we decide which ideas are good and which are bad.
    • A. 

      True

    • B. 

      False

  • 12. 
    Since news media is rarely biased we can generally believe whatever is written in a major news source, like a newspaper.
    • A. 

      True

    • B. 

      False

  • 13. 
    To be accepted as a scientific fact, something must be objectively verified and replicated.  That means that other scientists should be able to do the same experiment and come up with the same results.  
    • A. 

      True

    • B. 

      False

  • 14. 
    Another word for "unpublished reports" could also be "gossip."  
    • A. 

      True

    • B. 

      False

  • 15. 
    Truth does not change.
    • A. 

      True

    • B. 

      False

  • 16. 
    Good thinkers allow their feelings to shape their conclusions.
    • A. 

      True

    • B. 

      False

  • 17. 
    "Some one else  made me do it" is a defense mechanism known as:
    • A. 

      Fear

    • B. 

      Stereotyping

    • C. 

      Rationalization

    • D. 

      Face-saving

  • 18. 
    A defense mechanism where we try to explain away our ideas or actions is known as:
    • A. 

      Stereotyping

    • B. 

      Face-saving

    • C. 

      Rationalization

    • D. 

      Resistance to change

  • 19. 
    A very extreme form of generalization, whereby a person forms opinions based on minimal examples is known as:
    • A. 

      Stereotyping

    • B. 

      Fear

    • C. 

      Rationalization

    • D. 

      Conformity

  • 20. 
    The following statement: "Donna can't have cheated on her boyfriend.  She's such a good employee." is a fallacy in reasoning known as:
    • A. 

      Tautology

    • B. 

      Sweeping generalization

    • C. 

      Non sequitur (does not follow)

    • D. 

      Appeal to ignorance

  • 21. 
    "I was wearing my lucky red sweater.  That's why I won at the casino!" is a fallacy of reasoning known as:
    • A. 

      Tu quo quo (two wrongs make a right)

    • B. 

      Slippery slope

    • C. 

      Damning the source

    • D. 

      Post hoc ergo propter hoc (faulty cause)

  • 22. 
    "Anyone who supports that candidate is a coward or a fool."  is a fallacy in reasoning known as:
    • A. 

      Damning the source

    • B. 

      Slippery slope

    • C. 

      Appeal to consequences

    • D. 

      Appeal to authority

  • 23. 
    "We have to serve cake at the wedding.  That's what is always done." is a fallacy of reasoning known as:
    • A. 

      Bandwagon or appeal to common belief

    • B. 

      Appeal to tradition

    • C. 

      Bifurcation

    • D. 

      Begging the question

  • 24. 
    • A. 

      Appeal to tradition

    • B. 

      Damning the source

    • C. 

      Appeal to extremes

    • D. 

      Slippery slope

  • 25. 
    "I think the best performer should win American Idol, so I'm voting for Stacy because she's the best." is a fallacy of reasoning known as:
    • A. 

      Tautology

    • B. 

      Appeal to consequences

    • C. 

      Begging the question

    • D. 

      Bandwagon or appeal to common belief

  • 26. 
    "Helen must be guilty of cheating on her husband.  She can't prove she was at home the night he was out of town!" is a fallacy of reasoning known as:
    • A. 

      Begging the question

    • B. 

      Tautology

    • C. 

      Appeal to ignorance

    • D. 

      Damning the source

  • 27. 
    • A. 

      Non sequitur

    • B. 

      Tu quo quo (two wrongs make a right)

    • C. 

      Post hoc ergo propter hoc (faulty cause)

    • D. 

      Tautology

  • 28. 
    "I won't take my anti-depression medication because Tom Cruise said it was a mistake." is a fallacy in reasoning known as:
    • A. 

      Non sequitur

    • B. 

      Appeal to tradition

    • C. 

      Appeal to ignorance

    • D. 

      Appeal to authority

  • 29. 
    "Fashion students don't care much about politics." is a fallacy in reasoning known as:
    • A. 

      Tautology

    • B. 

      Begging the question

    • C. 

      Sweeping generalization

    • D. 

      Faulty cause

  • 30. 
    "Everyone cuts and pastes material from the internet once in awhile when writing a paper, so you can't really consider it plagiarism." is a fallacy in reasoning known as:
    • A. 

      Appeal to authority

    • B. 

      Bandwagon or appeal to common belief

    • C. 

      Appeal to extremes

    • D. 

      Appeal to ignorance

  • 31. 
    "If you want to reform health care, why don't we just get rid of private insurance completely and let the government take complete control the health industry." is a fallacy of reasoning known as:
    • A. 

      Appeal to extremes

    • B. 

      Appeal to consequences

    • C. 

      Non sequitur

    • D. 

      Bandwagon or appeal to common beliefs

  • 32. 
    When a news story or "talking points" gets reported over and over again in multiple news sources it can make the story seem more true in the eyes of the public.  This is known as:
    • A. 

      Echo effect or echo chamber

    • B. 

      Sourcing

    • C. 

      Fourth estate

    • D. 

      Propaganda

  • 33. 
    The Fairness Doctrine, which stated that political candidates had to be given equal time on television, was eliminated during the Reagan administration.  It has been a controversial issue since.  
    • A. 

      True

    • B. 

      False

  • 34. 
    An implied, but not stated, part of an argument is often called:
    • A. 

      Bifurcation

    • B. 

      Hidden premise

    • C. 

      Syllogism

    • D. 

      Complex argument

  • 35. 
    Karen knew that all fashion students were silly because her roommate in college was a fashion student and extremely silly.  Karen is engaging in:
    • A. 

      Overgeneralizing

    • B. 

      Shifting the burden of proof

    • C. 

      Oversimplifying

    • D. 

      Bifurcation

  • 36. 
    Bifurcation could also be defined as:
    • A. 

      Damning the source

    • B. 

      Overgeneralization

    • C. 

      Either/or thinking

    • D. 

      All of these

  • 37. 
    The infamous Stanely Milgrim experiment upset many people because it suggested that most people would hurt another person, even if they didn't know them.  This suggests that most people are suspectible to the power of:
    • A. 

      Bifurcation

    • B. 

      Overgeneralization

    • C. 

      Either/or thinking

    • D. 

      Conformity

  • 38. 
    • A. 

      Oversimplification

    • B. 

      Either/or thinking

    • C. 

      Resistance to change

    • D. 

      Conformity

  • 39. 
    • A. 

      Overgeneralization

    • B. 

      Face-saving

    • C. 

      Mine is better

    • D. 

      Rationalization