Connell Guides Christmas Quiz

10 Questions | Total Attempts: 73

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Connell Guides Christmas Quiz

Here's a festive-themed quiz, just in time for Christmas!


Questions and Answers
  • 1. 
    “'Twas the night before Christmas, when all through the house,Not a creature was stirring, not even a mouse” These are some of the most famous lines in Christmas verse. But who wrote them? 
    • A. 

      Mark Twain

    • B. 

      Clement Moore

    • C. 

      Walt Whitman

    • D. 

      Washington Irving

  • 2. 
    J.D. Salinger's classic novel The Catcher in the Rye sees its protagonist, Holden Caulfield, wandering around a wintery New York. At one point, he's perplexed by a seasonal question. What is it that bothers him?
    • A. 

      How Santa Claus carries so many presents

    • B. 

      Where the Central Park ducks go during wintertime

    • C. 

      How the trains run through the snow

    • D. 

      Why the pipes don't all freeze up

  • 3. 
    The Pogues' boisterous hit “Fairytale of New York” is a karaoke favourite at Christmas time. But who wrote the 1973 novel A Fairytale of New York, from which the song's title was taken?
    • A. 

      John Updike

    • B. 

      James Baldwin

    • C. 

      Joyce Carol Oates

    • D. 

      J. P. Donleavy

  • 4. 
    James Joyce's Dubliners closes with a well-known passage about wintery weather. But what was “general all over Ireland”?
    • A. 

      Fog

    • B. 

      Sleet

    • C. 

      Snow

    • D. 

      Mist

  • 5. 
    Some say that ever, ’gainst that season comesWherein our Saviour’s birth is celebrated,The bird of dawning singeth all night long;And then, they say, no spirit dare stir abroad,The nights are wholesome, then no planets strike,No fairy takes, nor witch hath power to charm,So hallow’d and so gracious is the time. It wasn't often that Shakespeare made mention of Christmas in his plays. From which classic work is the above extract taken?
    • A. 

      Hamlet

    • B. 

      Measure for Measure

    • C. 

      The Merry Wives of Windsor

    • D. 

      Henry IV Part II

  • 6. 
    During one of his daughter's childhood illnesses, Mark Twain wrote a lovely letter to her under the guise of Santa Clause (it purported to be written from “The Palace of Saint Nicholas in the Moon”, on Christmas morning). Twain's most famous novel is The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn, but which famous American river forms its setting?
    • A. 

      The Colorado River

    • B. 

      The Mississippi River

    • C. 

      The Rio Grande

    • D. 

      The Hudson River

  • 7. 
    Pantomime is a regular feature of the Christmas calendar — a residual trace of the English taste for musical theatre. One of the most popular themes is “Snow White and the Seven Dwarves” but not many people can remember who wrote that tale. Can you?
    • A. 

      Hans Christian Andersen

    • B. 

      The Brothers Grimm

    • C. 

      Lewis Carroll

    • D. 

      E. T. A. Hoffmann

  • 8. 
    C.S. Lewis's The Lion, The Witch and the Wardrobe takes place over the festive season — even if, in Narnia, it's “always Winter, but never Christmas”. Lewis was a master of languages, and Aslan, the name of Narnia's lion king, actually means “lion” in a certain one. Can you choose which?
    • A. 

      Old Norse

    • B. 

      Provencal

    • C. 

      Turkish

    • D. 

      Hungarian

  • 9. 
    In Arthur Conan Doyle's “The Adventure of the Blue Carbuncle”, which appeared in 1892's The Adventures of Sherlock Holmes, sees the famous detective and his colleague Watson unravelling the mystery of a jewel hidden inside a Christmas Goose. Can you recall the number of Holmes's and Watson's house on Baker Street?
    • A. 

      43A

    • B. 

      103

    • C. 

      3

    • D. 

      221B

  • 10. 
    Charles Dickens's 1843 novella A Christmas Carol gave us some of yuletide's most familiar characters, not least the old miser Ebenezer Scrooge. His second name has itself become synonymous with “miserly”, and bares a distinct similarity to the now little-heard verb “scrouge”. Can you pick the word's precise definition?
    • A. 

      To score or gouge a mark in metal.

    • B. 

      To erase writing from a blackboard.

    • C. 

      To squeeze or press something.

    • D. 

      To cut a path through mud, snow or ash.

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