Ancient Babylonian Law And Punishment! Trivia Questions Quiz

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Ancient Babylonian Law And Punishment! Trivia Questions Quiz

Below are the Ancient Babylonian Law and Punishment Trivia Questions Quiz. In ancient Babylon, the laws that were put in place were seen to mostly favor the rich than the poor. Did you know that when a commoner committed a crime, they would risk having their hands chopped off? Take up the quiz and see what other means one would be punished through.


Questions and Answers
  • 1. 
    Ancient code of 250 laws instituted by the King of Babylon, around 1750 B.C.E., dealing with criminal and civil matters. 
    • A. 

      Deuteronomy

    • B. 

      Code of hammurabi

    • C. 

      Mosaic code

  • 2. 
    Code of the Israelites, (Deuteronomy) around 1200 B.C.E., the foundation of Judeo- Christian moral teachings and is the partial basis for the U.S. legal system. • Based on the belief that God entered a covenant with Israel in which they agreed to obey His law, in return for God’s care & protection.
    • A. 

      Magna carta

    • B. 

      Code of hammurabi

    • C. 

      Mosaic code

  • 3. 
    As a guarantee of liberties consisting of 63 clauses signed by King John of England in 1215 that influenced many modern legal and constitutional principles.
    • A. 

      Magna carta

    • B. 

      Code of hammurabi

    • C. 

      Mosaic code

  • 4. 
    A legal principle that requires that in subsequent cases on similar issues of law and fact, courts be bound by their own earlier decisions b those of higher courts having jurisdiction over them. The term literally means “sanding by decided manners.”
    • A. 

      State decisis

    • B. 

      Tort

    • C. 

      Common law

  • 5. 
    A wrongful act, damage, or injury not involving a breach of contract. Also, a private or civil wrong or injury.
    • A. 

      Corpus delecti

    • B. 

      Tort

    • C. 

      Concurrence

  • 6. 
    The state of min that accompanies a criminal act. also, a guilty mind
    • A. 

      Actus reus

    • B. 

      Mens rea

    • C. 

      Concurrence

  • 7. 
    The coexistence of (1) an act in violation of the law (actus reus) and (2) a culpable mental state (men's rea).
    • A. 

      Concurrence

    • B. 

      Corpus delecti

    • C. 

      Tort

  • 8. 
    The facts show that a crime has occurred. The term literally means “the body of the crime.”
    • A. 

      Corpus delecti

    • B. 

      Stare decisis

    • C. 

      Mens rea

  • 9. 
    @font-face { font-family: "Arial"; }@font-face { font-family: "Calibri"; }p.MsoNormal, li.MsoNormal, div.MsoNormal { margin: 0in 0in 0.0001pt; line-height: 115%; font-size: 11pt; font-family: "Times New Roman"; }div.Section1 { page: Section1; } An offence not yet completed. Also, an offence that consists of action or conduct that is a step toward the intended commission of another offence.
    • A. 

      Incohate offense

    • B. 

      Alibi

    • C. 

      Ranch

  • 10. 
    @font-face { font-family: "Arial"; }@font-face { font-family: "Calibri"; }p.MsoNormal, li.MsoNormal, div.MsoNormal { margin: 0in 0in 0.0001pt; line-height: 115%; font-size: 11pt; font-family: "Times New Roman"; }div.Section1 { page: Section1; } A statement of contention by an individual charged with a crime that he or she was so distant when the crime was committed, or so engaged in other probable activities that his or her participation in the commission of that crime is impossible.
    • A. 

      Alibi

    • B. 

      Justification

    • C. 

      Necessity

  • 11. 
    A legal defence in which the defendant admits to committing the act in question but claims it was necessary in order to avoid some greater evil.
    • A. 

      Necessity

    • B. 

      Justification

    • C. 

      Consent

  • 12. 
    A legal defence based on the claim that committing the crime was more beneficial than adhering to the law. There is no intent to violate the law.
    • A. 

      Necessity

    • B. 

      Justifications

    • C. 

      Consent

  • 13. 
    Claims that whatever harm was done occurred only after the injured person gave his or her permission for the behaviour in question.
    • A. 

      Consent

    • B. 

      Necessity

    • C. 

      Alibi

  • 14. 
    Check all the types of excuses.
    • A. 

      Public duty

    • B. 

      Race

    • C. 

      Age

    • D. 

      Mistake of law or fact

    • E. 

      Involuntary intoxication

  • 15. 
    Common law and the constitutional prohibition against a second trial for the same offence.
    • A. 

      Consent

    • B. 

      Public duty

    • C. 

      Double jeopardy

  • 16. 
    A nonuniformed mounted law enforcement officer of medieval England. Early police forces were small and relatively unorganized but made effective use of local resources in the formation of posses, the pursuit of offenders, and the like
    • A. 

      Tithing

    • B. 

      Comes stabuli

    • C. 

      Statute of limitations